StripersOnline › SurfTalk › How-To Forums › Do It Yourself › Well water Vs. City water
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Well water Vs. City water

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
The house we got has well water. We got the water tested and one of the elements came back above normal levels. Arsenic. A level of 5.0 is acceptable. This one came back at 5.24. Doesn't seem to be crazy high. I don't know much about arsenic, just that in high levels can do some damage .

So my first question: Is 0.24 above normal level really that big of a deal? A filtration system will run me roughly 2.5k Is it worth it?

Second question: Is it worth converting to city water? We have a the lines running by the house.

Thinking long term, these filtration systems need maintenance. They run kind of steep as well. Now, on top of this new system, I need to worry about the pump, tank, salts and god knows what else.

Any thoughts? Any one have a similar problem? Any one change from well to city water?

Thanks in advance...
post #2 of 28
I had wells in two of my houses, big pain in the a$$. Water testing, cleaning system after testing bad, maintaining pump(shallow), $$$, but biggest pain was when you lose power you can't flush
post #3 of 28
if you have easy access to city water, take it. No maintenance, better water, water is available during power outages,etc.
post #4 of 28
Wells are a serious PITA. Two weeks ago, I wake up tragically hung over and am horrified to discover that the well pump had died. No water to drink, no coffee, no shower. Now, when you are tragically hung over, what are the three things you head straight for? I called a local plumber who is there in a heartbeat, miraculously find a Gould well pump at 10:00 AM on a Sunday, and by 12:00 noon we have water back. Not good water....smelly, nasty water that took three days to get rid of.

Avoid a well if you can.
post #5 of 28
We don't have a choice. But our well water tastes great.

Cabo
post #6 of 28
Convert, but keep the well to water the grass. Going on city water is a no brainer especially since you're faced with spending money anyhow. Running filters and treating water causes an endless amount of expenses and requires effort to keep running right.
post #7 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul_M View Post
Convert, but keep the well to water the grass. Going on city water is a no brainer especially since you're faced with spending money anyhow. Running filters and treating water causes an endless amount of expenses and requires effort to keep running right.

that's what i would do, I would bring the city water for the house, then use the well for your outside water hoses and irrigation,
post #8 of 28
i have well water in PA,
for years had brown clay in the water,
after getting a $2000 filter system,
no problems, no hassles,
since its a weekend home, i get service every 2 yrs, at a cost of about $100
full time residence would recomend every year,
and can probably do it yourself,
city water is convenient
but for cost, will you be getting a water bill from your town?
how much to run the line to connect to city water?
if meter is required how much for the meter?
post #9 of 28
My well water is very very clean. It is a very deep well, no problems with output all year long, but I don't water grass.

If they wanted to put me on city water at this point I would fight it tooth and nail.

My well is 30 years old, never gave the previous owners an issues. I will eventually have to replace the pump and workings, but the well itself should give me clean safe water for generations.
post #10 of 28
I have a well. There's no public water where I live so it's the only choice.
The water comes directly out of the ground unfiltered so I have to run
it through a Brita filter before I drink it, but other than that it's just fine.
post #11 of 28
Thread Starter 
seems like the majority enjoy their well water. hmmmm, I was told that if we want city water our well will have to be shut down. Any truth in that? I want to find some answers before I go deal with people in city hall.
post #12 of 28
It is a shame but city water or well water you should have both tested periodically. You cannot trust anyone providing water as a product as they are watching their bottom line and will not tell when there are issues. You cannot trust your neighbors not to be dumbing illegal chemicals or storage tanks rupturing ands letting you know. We all have to be self protective of what we are recieving as safe water. Another problem is not all chemicals are on the goverment watch list with safe levels.
post #13 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by sand blister View Post
seems like the majority enjoy their well water. hmmmm, I was told that if we want city water our well will have to be shut down. Any truth in that? I want to find some answers before I go deal with people in city hall.



I'd do a little checking w the town building inspector. It would be prudent of them to make sure that after they hooked you up that you were a customer and not using the town water as a backup supply. Also I suspect they don't want well water backfeeding into their system. If the outdoor water system was completely separate I don't think there would be an issue w having both.
post #14 of 28
We ran into the arsenic issue when we sold our home 5 years ago. It seems the NJ EPA dropped the allowable standard from 20PPB (I think) down to 5PPB. So if you are at 5.24 you are barely over the limit.

The decision as to whether that .24 makes it especially dangerous to you is your call. Are there young children in the house? Are you mixing baby formula with the tap water?

You could get a bottled water dispensor for cooking and drinking water.

Becuase we were selling we had to remediate. I think we ended up paying about $1200 for a filtration system to be installed that took our count from 7PPB to under 2PPB.

For the record I would not give up my well water unless I started glowing green. City water smells dirty and reaks of chlorine if you are used to well water. Is the city water any safer than the extra .24PPB of arsenic??

Good luck with your situation.

Alan
post #15 of 28
I assume the units are micrograms per liter (ug/L) or parts per billion (ppb), not mg/L or ppm? EPA's Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) for arsnic is 10 ppb so you are still below that. The MCL is the number that water suppliers have to treat to. In other words up to 10 ppb is allowed in city water, although states may enforce stricter standards. It isn't out of the ordinary to have 5 ppb in groundwater depending on where you live. EPA has a webpage on the risks associated with arsenic and that might help you decided whether or not you want to do anything about it.



Do you have any sort of filter on your system or did the lab report the results as total or dissolved arsenic? I'm not a water treatment expert, but if that result was for unfiltered watter it might just be sediment getting through. A simple mechanical filter might do the trick rather than one of those expensive ones. You could try it and send off another sample of the filtered water and see how that result comes back. The lab could filter it for you or you might be able to find something for not too much money that you can add on to your tap(s).
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Do It Yourself
StripersOnline › SurfTalk › How-To Forums › Do It Yourself › Well water Vs. City water