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How to take a boat off blocks and onto a trailer?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Does anyone know a good link with a set of step by step instructions to take a boat off blocks (in the driveway) and put it on a trailer? I've never done it or seen it done and will have to do it next week.
post #2 of 18
How big a boat and what type of trailer?? Sometimes this is not something I would read about and try to do!!

It could end up badly!
post #3 of 18
We do it at the marina in the spring and fall for a couple of pontoon boats. We use a backhoe and chains. Find the points that the boat is most stable, attach chains, slowly lift the boat enough to get the weight off the blocks. Back the trailer underneath, lower boat attach to trailer and your good to go. If you don't have access to a backhoe I don't really know how to do it.

We have also used a low boy trialer with hydraulics that lower and raise the trailer. It is specifically built for boats.
post #4 of 18
Small boat, level driveway, three point support of boat? I would get the trailer lined up and backed up till the back of trailer touches the bow blocks. Attach winch cable to bow point and remove all slack from cable. Set jack so that it is about one inch from topping out with boat protection installed, then block jack up to contact with boat with Jack set back near mid point of boat. Raise boat one inch remove bow blocks. move trailer under boat, take up slack in winch line. Lower boat on to trailer, remove jack, move trailer under boat until rear blocks get in way. Remove slack from winch cable. if needed lift trailer and boat together at stern (jack or jacks under trailer) till blocks can be removed. Lower boat and trailer, winch boat fully on to trailer and secure. (Bow rope to trailer post, stern strap or straps)

There are no breaks on a trailer that is not attached to a car. And in most cases this is still true with a car, but you do have the cars breaks to keep the trailer in place. If only blocks are used to keep the trailer from rolling be sure to keep them up to the wheels every step of the way.

I have never done this, but if I had to, this is how I would do it.

Peace
post #5 of 18
You're going to need two sets of bow blocks. Keep backing the trailer up until you can't go any further. Place bow blocks in front of trailer crossmember and remove rearmost bow blocks. Keep doing this until you reach the stern blocks, then lower on to trailer and winch it in.



This is a two man job. Be very careful backing up to the bow blocks.



I've done it a few times - just take your time and don't try any short cuts.
post #6 of 18
Do the bow of the boat like Wayne TJ said. When you get half of the trailer under the boat, I then use a floor jack which I place under stern of the boat. Place a piece of wood between the jack and the boat and lift the boat barely off of the chine supports. I place plywood under the floor jack up to the rear of the trailer and then winch the boat onto the trailer. The jack rolls forward on the plywood. You still need someone else at the stern making sure the boat does not begin to topple. This person continously moves the chines supports forward until the boat is stable on the trailer.

Knock on wood, but my 22' boat never swayed when we did it this way.
post #7 of 18
many ways you could do this, ALL similar to the ways Red, Wayne, And junk describe. All depend on the boat style, size, where it's sitting.

It is 9,000,000x easier to show somebody this operation, than describe it. Lots of things to be done, that can be show in 2 seconds, but would take an hour to describe in type.

If this is a 16' and under, very light boat, it MAY be a single man job. If anything over 16', it must be 2 guys. Not because it is hard, but you have to be 16' apart at the same time, which is hard to do.

If it is a very light boat, hence small, you might be able to use a few cynder-blocks to replace one of these people.
post #8 of 18
Thread Starter 
Yeah this is going to be interesting. Its a 20' boat. Anyone in the LBI area willing to help in person?
post #9 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne Tj View Post
You're going to need two sets of bow blocks. Keep backing the trailer up until you can't go any further. Place bow blocks in front of trailer crossmember and remove rearmost bow blocks. Keep doing this until you reach the stern blocks, then lower on to trailer and winch it in.

This is a two man job. Be very careful backing up to the bow blocks.

I've done it a few times - just take your time and don't try any short cuts.


This is the way I have always done it as well.
post #10 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by CedarsFinest View Post
Yeah this is going to be interesting. Its a 20' boat. Anyone in the LBI area willing to help in person?


If you trust me enough to show you how to do it, and help you, just let me know when you need the hand.

I use, BASICALLY, the wayne tj method, with a few of my own "shortcut" actions thrown in. It should only take maybe 20 minutes if you have all the wood. You'll need a 2nd set of bow blocks/keel blocks, and a few thinner/smaller pieces of wood, maybe 1x4's, 2x4's, and some plywood. Oh, bunk or roller? It makes a difference.
post #11 of 18
First I would lower the back quite a bit to increase stability. Than I would line up the trailer and my truck perfectly. Get the trailer under far enough so if anything slips the trailer takes the weight, instead of my head. Lower the front until the boat rests on the trailer. Hook the winch into the boat eye, emergency brake off, etc. Start power winching. The trailer and vehicle are pulled under the boat. Whole job goes pretty quick. After the first year I learned to store the boat much lower to the ground, so I could to the whole job in about 15 minutes.

Taking the boat off the trailer I would reverse winch (pulley attached to rear of trailer) while supporting the rear with blocks. Once the blocks made solid contact, I tied the transom to the bulkhead, disconnected winch, and slowly pulled the trailer forward with the tow vehicle, and the winch on free-wheel. Once the trailer is far enough forward, stop and put front blocks under bow, and pull away.

This works only for a roller trailer. Also by having the boat connected to the tow vehicle, prevents having the trailer tongue end up pointing at the sky.

I did this for about a half dozen years with a heavy 1980 22' Aquasport cuddy, until I bought a trailer. Before that I would rent a trailer each spring and fall.

PS: I learned the technique after paying a "pro" to take the boat off the blocks once.
post #12 of 18
An engine hoist with strapping on the bow hook makes it easier but I've done it with just car jacks and blocks, always did it on my own , not a big deal. 20' CC.

I push the trailer under the boat by hand rather than use a vehicle, its easier to line it up and adjust by hand if alone.

Push the trailer until the trailer axle reaches the fwd blocks, then jack the keel and move the blocks in front of the axle and remove the jack then keep sliding the trailer under. I used auto jackstands with ply pads to protect the glasswork and give a firm footing underneath the stands. The key is to have the 2 stern corners safely blocked so its stable when the keel is jacked.

I have bunks so my trailer has to be backed all the way underneath, it won't move by winching alone.
post #13 of 18
It's easiest done with a set of jack stands in the stern, as you can lower the boat by just turning the spindle. I bought a set when my boat was new - best investment I ever made for painting the bottom in the spring.

I can jack the boat off trailer with the addition of a bow block, then remove the trailer rollers and paint with the trailer still under the boat. Removing or replacing the sets of roller "trees" takes less than an hour. I put Never Seez on the ubolt threads so that they come off with no problem using a Hilti cordless impact drill with a deep socket.
post #14 of 18
^I also move the trailer by hand, rather than with a tow vehicle. This is possible to ABOUT a 20' trailer, then it becomes VERY heavy. After that, I would use one of those "portable tongue dolly's". Much easier to maneuver than a truck.
post #15 of 18
You can roll the boat off the trailer and as it comes off the back, prop up the boat with wood and timbers to keep it level and upright.

As the trailer is pulled forward add supports to the boat as you go until the boat is rest on the wood only. Good luck and use a lot of supports not to damage the hull.
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