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World's Biggest Blue Marlin Ever.

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
THE MONSTER\t\t

Pictured below is a truly mammoth Pacific blue marlin weighing in the vicinity of 3,000 lbs. Note the width of the fish through the "shoulders" and the very pronounced crest.







The enormous Pacific blue marlin pictured below weighed 1,656 lbs. and was caught in 1984 by angler Gary Merriman fishing with the legendary Capt. Bart Miller on his "Black Bart." This 17-foot long beast is the largest blue marlin ever brought into Kona, Hawaii, and the second largest Pacific blue ever caught by rod and reel. It was also the largest blue marlin caught in the world in 1984.







Pictured below is a massive blue marlin that was caught off Okinawa by a commercial fisherman using a handline. It is said to have "bottomed" a one ton (1,000 kg) set of scales meaning the fish weighed more than 2,200 lbs.



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\t

Largest Blue Marlin on Rod and Reel

Above, this is known as "Choy's Monster." It weighed 1,805 lbs. or 820 kg. when weighed in Honolulu in 1970. Capt. Cornelius Choy and his daughter Gail acting as deckhand had taken 6 holiday makers out for a days sport fishing. None were experienced anglers. After fighting the fish for some time and passing the rod around, Capt. Chow finally took the rod and brought the fish to the boat where his daughter wired it. Naturally, it could not qualify for an IGFA world record, but it does stand to this day as the largest blue ever taken on rod and reel. (Photo, IGFA)





I had a book when I was a kid - "Big fish and blue water."



They sure don't make em [Blue Marlin] like they used to.

post #2 of 22
Thread Starter 
Guys...this is a fishing forum! It's about fishing! You would keep a trout and fry it up with nooooooo problem, but something big DESERVES to live! I myself would not "keep" a Marlin. Most of these pics are 25 years old or more! Knock it off with the "I would have thrown him back" crap, already!
post #3 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Mad Deckhand View Post
Guys...this is a fishing forum! It's about fishing! You would keep a trout and fry it up with nooooooo problem, but something big DESERVES to live! I myself would not "keep" a Marlin. Most of these pics are 25 years old or more! Knock it off with the "I would have thrown him back" crap, already!




Lol, I like your sig!
post #4 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by fishinfanatic View Post
Lol, I like your sig!



I'm an odd duck that likes to play devil's advocate....



I'm a poor man's Lenny Bruce!
post #5 of 22
95% of blue marlin are released. Captains will kill granders because that is the "fish of a lifetime" same as a 50 lb striped bass. People fish their whole lives and never catch one. I have been marlin fishing four or five times and never got one. going to give it another go this year. I was in Kona on my honeymoon last year and the boat I fished on had a "grander" a week before I fished with them. Giant marlin are still around. There are a couple 1,000 plus pound fish caught in Kona every year.





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post #6 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by windknot7979 View Post
Mokes I would guess they take a pic and toss it in to the trash heap..



wrong. Many times they steak those fish and they are given to local food banks. Fish are not wasted in Hawaii.
post #7 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oakey View Post
95% of blue marlin are released. Captains will kill granders because that is the "fish of a lifetime" same as a 50 lb striped bass. People fish their whole lives and never catch one. I have been marlin fishing four or five times and never got one. going to give it another go this year. I was in Kona on my honeymoon last year and the boat I fished on had a "grander" a week before I fished with them. Giant marlin are still around. There are a couple 1,000 plus pound fish caught in Kona every year.








Good luck, man! Wow! I have never even fished for a bill-fish. Fantastic!
post #8 of 22
Mad Deckhand, I had that book too, I think, one of my favourites as a kid - was the author Capt. W. B. Gray, one of the founders of the Miami Seaquarium ?
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Mad Deckhand View Post
Good luck, man! Wow! I have never even fished for a bill-fish. Fantastic!







It does not take any skill really on the part of the "Fisherman" the captains and mates do all the work....all you have to do is come up with the coin to charter the boat and have enough physical strength/stamina and minimal rod and reel skills to stay tight to the fish. I have a life list of fish that I drew up years ago and I check them off as I catch them. Blue or Black Marlin is on the list and has eluded me thus far. Hope to change that this year.
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oakey View Post
95% of blue marlin are released. Captains will kill granders because that is the "fish of a lifetime" same as a 50 lb striped bass. People fish their whole lives and never catch one. I have been marlin fishing four or five times and never got one. going to give it another go this year. I was in Kona on my honeymoon last year and the boat I fished on had a "grander" a week before I fished with them. Giant marlin are still around. There are a couple 1,000 plus pound fish caught in Kona every year.










Maryland just had their state record broken again this year in the world's largest billfish tournament in the world, fish went 1010 and some change.



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post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by DerrickT View Post
Maryland just had their state record broken again this year in the world's largest billfish tournament in the world, fish went 1010 and some change.












My friends tell me there have been alot of marlin both blue and white in the mid atlantic-northeast canyons the last few years. it would be funny if I caught my marlin in back in New Jersey.
post #12 of 22
First off, most of those fish are sold for food. In Hawaii, most of the charter boats get to keep the fish that are caught. They make money by selling them to the fish market.

Second, there is skill required to land these fish. Sure, you are not stalking them and casting to individual fish. Most are hooked trolling or on a live bait tossed out after they com up on the trolled lures. Oakey, don't give me that crap about the captain and mates doing all of the work. Sure there is some boat work involved when fighting a big fish, but it is far from a done deal. Its like hooking a 50 lbs striper while blind casting. Unlike you, I have caught marlin, so I at least have some basis to talk.

BTW Blue marlin are excellent table fare like swordfish, though I would recommend releasing them.
post #13 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by crashq View Post
First off, most of those fish are sold for food. In Hawaii, most of the charter boats get to keep the fish that are caught. They make money by selling them to the fish market.



Second, there is skill required to land these fish. Sure, you are not stalking them and casting to individual fish. Most are hooked trolling or on a live bait tossed out after they com up on the trolled lures. Oakey, don't give me that crap about the captain and mates doing all of the work. Sure there is some boat work involved when fighting a big fish, but it is far from a done deal. Its like hooking a 50 lbs striper while blind casting. Unlike you, I have caught marlin, so I at least have some basis to talk.



BTW Blue marlin are excellent table fare like swordfish, though I would recommend releasing them.





please explain....I have caught giant bluefin tuna up to 800 lbs...I know the drill. What does the angler do? On a charter... the captain runs the boat, picks the area to fish, the mate rigs and sets the spread, fish hits, mate takes the rod, passes it to the "fisherman" who is now sitting down in a chair. captain drives boat, works angles, follows fish, backs up on fish while "fisherman" sitting in a chair cranks the handle and pulls. Oh yey....the mate is also their to turn the chair if the fish goes off the port or starboard....I never said I have not been on a boat that has caught a marlin....I just have not personally been the one reeling in. I am not talking about live baiting marling where a person casts a mackerel to a cruising striped marlin, I am talking about charter fishing for blue marlin. It takes $, minimum rod skills and a certain amount of strength/stamina. There is no real "skill" involved....it is not like you are fighting a fish stand up...sorry, I do not see it.
post #14 of 22
Thread Starter 

Quote:








Originally Posted by Mangrove Jack
View Post

Mad Deckhand, I had that book too, I think, one of my favourites as a kid - was the author Capt. W. B. Gray, one of the founders of the Miami Seaquarium ?







Miami Seaquarium is a marine amusement park located on Virginia Key Island in Biscayne Bay which is very close to downtown Miami, Florida.





Dating back to 1955, the amusement park is the longest running oceanarium in the USA. The amusement park was the brainchild of Fred D Coppock and Captain W.B. Gray and when it first opened, it was the world’s largest marine life attraction.
post #15 of 22
Thread Starter 




\tBelow, a massive blue marlin weighing in the 2000-pound range heading for the horizon after a short, one-sided battle near Faial. (Photo, I. Haupt)

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