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What does a rod's line rating mean?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
On any given rod, there is a line rating. What is it telling us? Example, I have a heavy rod rated from 10 to 20 pounds. Does that mean the rod won't snap if I stick with 20lb's or lighter line because theoretically, the line would snap before the rod does?
post #2 of 14
nothing. absolutely nothing.



seriously.



you could break that rod with 4 pound test and fish it safely with 65 pound - it doesn't know or care how strong a line is on it. What matters is your drag setting and what angle you're holding the rod at when its under load - everything else is marketing BS.
post #3 of 14
A very good question and a reasonable theory as to what it means. EB I fear is correct. Why rod makers put this detail ,on their rods beats me.

Mike
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by EBHarvey View Post
nothing. absolutely nothing.

seriously.

you could break that rod with 4 pound test and fish it safely with 65 pound - it doesn't know or care how strong a line is on it. What matters is your drag setting and what angle you're holding the rod at when its under load - everything else is marketing BS.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Oliver View Post
A very good question and a reasonable theory as to what it means. EB I fear is correct. Why rod makers put this detail ,on their rods beats me.

Mike


I was told by a custom rod builder that there is no standard for rating a rod. One Companys 20lb rated rod might equal another companys 10 lb rated rod.

My St. Croix Surf (PSRS70L) that I usually use on the boat for stripers is rated for 4-8 Lb. test, it has easily handled stripers to 41" with 20lb braid. Did you ever read the rod warrenty that comes with each rod, if my St. Croix rod was to break using that line and I sent it in for warrenty, it would not be covered because I exceeded the line ratings.
post #5 of 14
I think the weight of the lure it can handle is the more important figure. Line weight is general guide.
post #6 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bass Ackwards View Post
Did you ever read the rod warrenty that comes with each rod, if my St. Croix rod was to break using that line and I sent it in for warrenty, it would not be covered because I exceeded the line ratings.



That's why I bought my St. Croix Triumph from LL Bean. I could blow it up trying to throw an anvil and they wouldn't care. They'd replace it under their 100% satisfaction guarantee. I would never use it if I abused the rod but it's good to know that I don't have to worry about technicalities.
post #7 of 14
The suggested casting weight range is merely the companies opinion on where the rod will perform at it's best. It is NOT a breaking point. Everybody casts different. Some lob em out others cast like they are looking to break a distance record with every cast.

I think the line rating is no longer necessary with the the current use of braid and the more efficient drags of today. Maybe as a guideline for someone new to fishing just so they have some sort of reference point.
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bass Ackwards View Post
Did you ever read the rod warrenty that comes with each rod, if my St. Croix rod was to break using that line and I sent it in for warrenty, it would not be covered because I exceeded the line ratings.


I've never, ever, ever heard of a company even asking this. It may be in the obscure verbiage found in the warranty -- I never read these things -- but I can't remember a single instance of a company ever even asking this. Here's why:

Let's say a rod is rated something like 15-30 lbs. If you fish 20 lb. mono, all is right with the world. But what happens if you switch to 30 lb. braid - which will probably have a true breaking strength somewhere around 45 or 50 lbs.? Does this invalidate the warranty?

Eebs is right: line weight, except in very specific applications, is an anachronistic measurement that doesn't mean anything. Do yourself a favor and ignore it.
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Belmo View Post
I've never, ever, ever heard of a company even asking this. It may be in the obscure verbiage found in the warranty -- I never read these things -- but I can't remember a single instance of a company ever even asking this. Here's why:



Let's say a rod is rated something like 15-30 lbs. If you fish 20 lb. mono, all is right with the world. But what happens if you switch to 30 lb. braid - which will probably have a true breaking strength somewhere around 45 or 50 lbs.? Does this invalidate the warranty?



Eebs is right: line weight, except in very specific applications, is an anachronistic measurement that doesn't mean anything. Do yourself a favor and ignore it.



St.Croix didn't ask it.It says on the warranty card to not exceed the recommended line ratings.I had a long discussion with St.Croixs service dept and they said unless its extremely obvious the rod was misused or abused they simply just replace the rod.They have never asked what pound line i use and i wouldnt care if they did because 99% of the time i use line that is lighter than what they recommend because i need maximum distance to reach the fish at the areas i fish now.



For example, i fish 10 and 14 pound fireline on a Penn Liveliner 560 with a 10'6 Legend surf , i happen to know that the average breaking point with these lines is 28 and 35 pounds respectively.

As others have said as long as you know how to effectively work your drag then you can use any line you want, and novices should stick with braid at the min 20 to 50 pound range because fishing the extremely light lines can frustrate the newly introduced, although fireline in the super light tests has never caused me problems but the braided lines in the super light test have caused me many headaches.
post #10 of 14
I was thinking it was more of a guideline -

"we recommend you do not use 80lb mono on this 4ft ultra-lite trout rod
post #11 of 14
Fireline is the biggest marketing BS ever. The 20lb line is really 50lb.



Guess what line companies --> 20lb braid should break right above 20lbs or so otherwise sell it as 50lb braid!!!!



I ignore the line rating. The casting rating is the only thing that matters to me and most of the time the company either way overstates or understates them to fit a target audience. I mean if your rod can't cast more than 2oz do you think its going to handle 20lbs of direct pressure?
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by J Barbosa;8093193[U
]Fireline is the biggest marketing BS ever. The 20lb line is really 50lb.

[/u]

Guess what line companies --> 20lb braid should break right above 20lbs or so otherwise sell it as 50lb braid!!!!



I ignore the line rating. The casting rating is the only thing that matters to me and most of the time the company either way overstates or understates them to fit a target audience. I mean if your rod can't cast more than 2oz do you think its going to handle 20lbs of direct pressure?



Just about all superlines and braids test way higher than whats listed on the package(not all though, for example Suffix performance breaks very close to its listed rating) so i wouldn't call it marketing BS however i would call it marketing BS if it said 50 pound and it really broke at 30 pound.You are correct though fireline in the 20 and surprisingly the 30 break at an average of 54.5 pounds.
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by J Barbosa View Post
I mean if your rod can't cast more than 2oz do you think its going to handle 20lbs of direct pressure?



I always wondered about that too. My FW rods are rated for 1/2 to 3/4 oz max. My SW 9ft rod is rated for 2.5oz.



I would think there is a big difference between a hookset and reeling in a 20lb fish vs the sudden snap of throwing lure. I wouldn't think I could cast a 5lb lure.
post #14 of 14
Lady caught 285lb halibut on a Calstar 700L with 20lb test line - World Record

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