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Plumbers putty solvent

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
What's the best way to clean up extra plumbers putty? I overdid my toilet a little in the front, and it's a total eyesore. Well, nobody else would ever notice, but I installed it, and I am by far my own worst critic.
post #2 of 13
Just rub it. It has linseed oil in it (I think), so Mineral spirits should wash it away.
post #3 of 13
Why would you use putty installing a toilet?



post #4 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by gadwall8 View Post
Why would you use putty installing a toilet?






Was thinking the same.

Usually I use an old toothbrush to clean up excess around faucets and SS sinks.

Personally I'll use phenoseal, or the sanded caulk to match the tile grout.
post #5 of 13
as a kid our old school plumber always made a horseshoe shaped putty rope around the base of the toilet before setting it, thats how I use to do it as well, now I just use polyseam or pheno.
Wet rag and some elbow grease, but a plastic taping knife contoured by a pair of wiss snips can really removed everything you want ,keep everything in place at the same time all without damaging the toilet. Usually 3 for a buck at walmart
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinB View Post
as a kid our old school plumber always made a horseshoe shaped putty rope around the base of the toilet before setting it,



Yep, that's why it's there.
post #7 of 13
I dry run toilets,and if they dont sit nice a little plaster of Paris around the flange guarantees success.WD 40 will clean it up also.If the grout is light be careful not to stain it.
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by BranfordJeff View Post
What's the best way to clean up extra plumbers putty? I overdid my toilet a little in the front, and it's a total eyesore. Well, nobody else would ever notice, but I installed it, and I am by far my own worst critic.
dont know why you would ever use putty on toilet a little more info would be great ,, if you put it in space between floor and toilet , pull it out with a screwdriver , they put a bead silocone in it
post #9 of 13
Putty will stain stone tile. If it comes in contact with the cut edge of a ceramic tile, the oil from the putty can migrate under the glaze and be a stain forever.

Old school doesn't make it right

post #10 of 13
Plumbers putty is not used for setting toilets.

The process is this:
The toilet flange lever should be no higher than 1/4" above nor 1/2" below floor level. An extra thick bowl wax or a second on without a plastic taper flow gasket can be added to get sufficient material for a good seal.
Once the toilet is set on the bowl wax and the nuts on the closet bolts are moderately snug. Bolt should be secured to the closet flange firmly with a washer and nut. All hardware must me non-ferrous.
If the floor is not perfectly level you'll have a little extra work to dl. Shims will be needs (soft plastic wedges available at the plumbing warehouse) to push under the bowl rim to get it and tank level in all directions. The bowl nuts are then snugged down. The wedges are then trimmed with a sharp blade. To get the best seal between the bowl and floor a sanded caulk is the best choice. These caulks (water soluble) are available at any good floor tile supplier and can be had in a myriad of colors to suit the floor color, grout lines or toilet ceramic as the case may be.

Been at it for 36 years now. Do it right, do it once, do it wrong, do it at least three times. It why plumbers get their wage. I have to fix if for free for a year if anything fails.



Merry Christmas, Rich
post #11 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Halcyon View Post
Plumbers putty is not used for setting toilets.

The process is this:
The toilet flange lever should be no higher than 1/4" above nor 1/2" below floor level. An extra thick bowl wax or a second on without a plastic taper flow gasket can be added to get sufficient material for a good seal.
Once the toilet is set on the bowl wax and the nuts on the closet bolts are moderately snug. Bolt should be secured to the closet flange firmly with a washer and nut. All hardware must me non-ferrous.
If the floor is not perfectly level you'll have a little extra work to dl. Shims will be needs (soft plastic wedges available at the plumbing warehouse) to push under the bowl rim to get it and tank level in all directions. The bowl nuts are then snugged down. The wedges are then trimmed with a sharp blade. To get the best seal between the bowl and floor a sanded caulk is the best choice. These caulks (water soluble) are available at any good floor tile supplier and can be had in a myriad of colors to suit the floor color, grout lines or toilet ceramic as the case may be.

Been at it for 36 years now. Do it right, do it once, do it wrong, do it at least three times. It why plumbers get their wage. I have to fix if for free for a year if anything fails.



Merry Christmas, Rich



DITTO!!!

Plastic wedges and sanded caulk.
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by gadwall8 View Post
Putty will stain stone tile. If it comes in contact with the cut edge of a ceramic tile, the oil from the putty can migrate under the glaze and be a stain forever.

Old school doesn't make it right




I have seen it stain a marble counter top..Plumber used it around the perimeter of the sink.
Not Good..
post #13 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks, guys.
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