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Southeast coast piers

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
Starting with...let's say Juno and heading south through Ft Lauderdale and Miami - aside from the usual small game/bottom fish fare usually encountered, what kind of offshore 'exotics' do you have a chance to encounter . I know you can catch kings, bonita (albies to us here in the north) and cobia. How often might you encounter a sail or mahi? I know it would probably fall under the 'don't hold your breath' catagory. But is it common enough to where the local regulars aren't too surprised when it happens or would it be 'eye popping' even to the most dedicated anglers of a given pier?
post #2 of 4
Thread Starter 
Btw, I ask this purely out of curiosity since I have no plans to spend an entire week hoping for the chance to catch lightning in a bottle. But we have similar talks here in the NE regarding the odds of hooking up with a bluefin tuna from shore...it's not likely but not unheard of.
post #3 of 4
Sailfish and mahi have been caught off our beaches and from piers, but don't
hold your breath...
You have a better chance of getting hit by lighting....
It would be a huge suprise to even the locals of any pier, because its
something that just doesnt happen...
You have to also remember that most piers have newies and tourist and the
locals most of time will avoid these type of people.
So if you are fishing on a weekend....be ready for people to be WOW by a catfish...
and if you catch a shark...Oh lord be ready for the questions, best one of all

"I didnt know they were Sharks on this beach"

Can't tell you how many times i have heard that one
post #4 of 4
deerfield pier frequently has reports of sailfish caught from the pier. Right now they're innundated with spinner and blacktip sharks....
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