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Another venison myth dies a proper death (Bone-In Roast)

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
No pics - it didn't last long.

I've cooked alot of wild game, and I've eaten a lot as well.

The North East US is a bizarre country where hunters and game cooks tend to throw out deer bones or debone before cooking because of the pervading myth that deer marrow tastes like a$$...

... truth be told - it's a load of bunk!


Back Story:

little 50lb deer bagged in November of 2008.

Deer was butchered by me and friend.

50lb deer yielded 22lbs of meat!

We save 1 whole hind quarter for a roast.

This was vaccuum sealed.

-------------

Couldn't find an occassion to serve this roast (almost 6 lbs) or every time I had it planned, it just didn't work out.

After clearing out freezer - It was begging to be thawed.

I began to thaw it out on Saturday morning 1/2.

Sunday Morning -
cut open vac bag - looked and smelled fresh after almost 14 months in deep freeze. (absolutely no freeser burn!!) perfectly thawed!

Drained extra blood, and pat dry with paper towels.

Seasoned deer ham with salt, pepper, and adobo.

Slathered on some plain old olive oil.

still needed something...

Found a bag of turbonado sugar and gave "ham" a thorough dusting.

A few shakes of coriander and I figured the rub was done.

Covered it - put it back in fridge and hit the pistol range for 3 hours.

---

4 pm - removed roast from fridge.

All sugar and spices seemed to have melded with meat.

Still missing something...

grabbed mini-processor from Big sister and roasting tips.

put garlic cloves, half a sweet onion, fresh basil and rosemmary in mini-processor...

Found a bottle of home-made merlot... Took a sip - way too sweet for drinkin.

quarter cup of sweet red into the processor.

Minced contents - not into a paste, but thick enough to slather on with a spatula.

Proceed slathering both sides and filling crevices with paste.

Pre-heat convect oven to 350 ROAST.

Added mini red potatoes (pappitas) and sweet onion quarters to roasting pan. As well as a final baptism of sweet wine on the roast - about 1/4 cup more.

Tented pan with foil (I don't own a covered roasting pan).

Roast sat in dead-center.

Set timer for 2 hours.

---

Watched Jet pre-game nonsense.

BEEEP - removed roast from oven - still kinda pale, veggies looked ok..

Gave it a poke with meat thermo - 140 - a little rare, and I don't trust those things.

My eyes and nose said: "give it another 30 minutes, but pull the cover off into the final 15...

- -
Removed from oven - perfect bronze and nice crisp near bone jooints.. no charring!

Gave it a thermo test - 150ish and no excessive bleeding. A bit clearer than before.

Let stand for 10 minutes. I'm in hunger agony - beer won't quit the pangs...

Bottom-Line
Best effin deer roast I ever ate!

Perfect medium rare in the middle - end cuts were like perfect lamb...

The juice, gravy, or whatever you want to call it was ****in magic!

Very tender and easy to cut.


I got left-overs - sammiches all week!


next time you butcher a deer - either get a rib-roast or do a rear quarter.

Don't toss the bone!

Better than leg of lamb!
post #2 of 26
That was a tasty deer.
post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kings over Queens View Post
That was a tasty deer.


That was different deer than the one I gave you...


Knowing what I know now I would have urged you to roast that whole hind quarter...

We got until second week of Feb - til the season shuts - One more doe is all I need.

From now on, it's whole roasts, standing ribs and mabe some shanks...
post #4 of 26
I never heard that venison bone marrow tasted bad but I have heard of Chronic Wasting Disease.

A few years ago I was told that CWD is why butchers in upstate NY were required to debone deer they processed for hunters and why every hunter should debone his venison for storage.
post #5 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimW View Post
I never heard that venison bone marrow tasted bad but I have heard of Chronic Wasting Disease.

A few years ago I was told that CWD is why butchers in upstate NY were required to debone deer they processed for hunters and why every hunter should debone his venison for storage.


Yep the CDC reccomends it, but if a deer is infected with CWD - you're not gonna eat it anyway. So - deboning a deer with CWD won't do a damn thing.

If bone-marrow is infected or bone connective tissue, the meat would be tainted from the deboning process.

The CDC believes that human's can get infected by cerebral spinal fluid or brain tissue - I don't eat brains or spinal cords, but some cultures do.


I have to take the CDC with a grain of salt here and rely on my personal experience working with livestock for slaughter and game ranching as well as eating lot's of things that were supposed to kill us all 20 years ago.
post #6 of 26
I don't think there have been any confimed cases where was transmitted to humans, just some speculation. I don't think anyone should be overly concerned. Just the only reason I ever heard of not to eat venison on the bone.
post #7 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimW View Post
I don't think there have been any confimed cases where was transmitted to humans, just some speculation. I don't think anyone should be overly concerned. Just the only reason I ever heard of not to eat venison on the bone.



No prob.

We don't have any cases of CWD in NJ.

---

Funny, I just called a vet hunter friend of mine to tell him that I made a bone in venison roast...

What does he say: "I bet the thigh bone ruined the meat..."

post #8 of 26
I just never got good at tying all those little pieces back together to make a decent roast after boning out a leg. ;-)
post #9 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimW View Post
I just never got good at tying all those little pieces back together to make a decent roast after boning out a leg. ;-)


... another reason why I left it "bone-in".
post #10 of 26
I've done a few standing rib roasts. I split the spine and clear the bone of all marrow and spinal goop (an industry technical term) first though. I cut the ribs down to about 2" above the rib eye and trim excess bone. I usually do this with a small deer so I use both rib roasts at the same time tying them together at the ends with twine.
I usually fill the circle in the middle with roasted potatoes, carrots and onions or a few heaping spoonfuls of well drained ratatouille from the garden.
Served medium rare with a good dry red wine.

Now I gotta go kill one or 2
My son has been bugging me to make some venison breakfast sausage and some smoked venison kielbasa.

Digger
post #11 of 26
i don't care what kind of animal it is, there all better with the bone. Venison rack of ribs...
post #12 of 26
I think a big reason for your success is allowing the meat to age...friend had a deer neck in the freezer for over a year...we grilled it and it ended up fork tender...even the kids loved it.....GL
post #13 of 26
I very young deer with bone in is fine, but once the spend a winter in the woods up here in Vt. eating browse and bark, take the bone out!
post #14 of 26
I don't think the meat ages when it's total frozen...



Quote:
Originally Posted by Spooler View Post
I think a big reason for your success is allowing the meat to age...friend had a deer neck in the freezer for over a year...we grilled it and it ended up fork tender...even the kids loved it.....GL
post #15 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sonny88 View Post
I very young deer with bone in is fine, but once the spend a winter in the woods up here in Vt. eating browse and bark, take the bone out!


My experience with wild game varies, but there is one constant:

If the game is dressed properly - regardless of what it has been dining on, the bones or marrow won't impart bad-flavor. The flavor will be from the fat.

Now bone-sour is a point of discussion. This occurs when it's warm and damp and you have no ice or you have a long haul ahead of you.

You can rapidly and completely field dress your kill - but humidity and heat will speed up the process.
Best thing to do is swab the chest cavity regularly until you get to a cooler or ice.

During Winter - whitetail deer will eat lichens, browse any tips (hopefully spruce is abundant) and if they eat bark - it better be sugar maple.

The only time I had really bad venison was when it wasn't properly cared for in the field.
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