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Costco scallops

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
I cooked some Costco scallops this evening. For frozen they're pretty good. Here's what I do.

Thaw out the scallops in a zip lock bag.
remove the scallops to a paper towel
reserve scallop juices
season with sea salt
heat a stainless steel pan to medium high heat.
add olive oil to coat bottom of pan
reduce heat add a tablespoon of butter
when butter melts turn up heat for one minute
press scallops into pan
cook for two minutes
if scallops release easily from pan turn them over and press into pan
cook for two more minutes and when scallops release from pan easily
plate and let stand
add reserved scallop juices to pan
whisk and reduce
pour over scallops.

serve scallops with your favorite vegetable or risotto.
post #2 of 18
Those Scallop juices are actually chemicals and presevratives put in to make them look nice and plump and give them a shine.
post #3 of 18
Thread Starter 
yum, ingredients say Sea Scallops, nothing else.
post #4 of 18
JB is correct to some extent. The juices are not entirely chemicals and preservatives. Most is scallop juice with a mixture of phosphates used in the freezing process to help the scallop retain liquid.

Back in my old days, I used to dredge sea scallops as a "day boat". Day boats got there name due to the fact, we were back to the dock the same day and the scallops were extremely fresh and never frozen. For our efforts, we got premium prices.

Large commercial scallop boats would stay out for days. Since scallops have a very short fresh shelf life, the scallops are usually frozen. In the freezing process, scallops are dipped in phosphates to allow them to soak up water before freezing so the loss of liquid in the thawing process does not dry out the scallop. Unfortunately, some scallopers found phosphates as a way of enhancing their catch weight. At times you can taste the phosphates. It's that funky, not quite ammonia/chemically taste. Over the years, the phosphates have been perfected to hide the taste. Also, the FDA regulates the amount of time scallopers are allowed to soak the scallops. The only problem, few scallop catches are ever checked.

For years, inexpensive frozen scallops (as well as many other frozen seafoods) have routinely been treated with phosphates, particularly sodium tripolyphosphate (STP), to reduce so-called "drip loss." STP and other related phosphates are GRAS (generally recognized as safe) food additives, and used in moderation, they help bind the natural moisture in seafood through the freezing and thawing process.

I've seen this process personally. A friend of mine is a processor of fluke. All his fluke fillets are dipped before being sent out, fresh or frozen. Scallops are the same. Many scallopers have been trying to hold unfrozen scallops longer by dipping them also. If you don't dip, the scallops begin dripping and the weight loss in significant.

The good news is dipping is GRAS or generally recognized as safe. The bad news, many times it's abused. I'm a scallop lover. For those of you who really love to eat quality scallops, find someone who deals in day boat scallops. There truly is a difference. If that is not possible, frozen scallops are acceptable. Over the past couple of years, the large commercial boats usually owned by corporations have forced the day boats out of the fishery. Day boat scallops, sometimes known as diver scallops and now we are seeing "chemical free" scallops are becoming harder to find. Due to the higher price for day scallops, large commercial vessels are keeping the last scallops of the trip separate as fresh to command higher prices.
post #5 of 18
Thanks Crabman for explaining that I didn't have all the info and didn't want go on and on.The only Scallops I eat are dry packed and they go for 12.95 a Lb down here but Man are they Sweet!
post #6 of 18
According to Costco, they do not allow STP to be used during the processing of their Scallops.

Google "Costco Scallops" for the entire article

Bernzy
post #7 of 18
I can assure you with 100% assurance that the Costco "Kirkland Signature" IQF Sea Scallops are 100% dry, all natural, Grade A, Sea Scallops.

No chemicals, no preservatives, no soak. Period.

There are not too many places you can get a scallop of this quality.

The window in my office overlooks the production floor where KS scallops are graded,frozen, baged & boxed, so I would say I have first hand knowledge....
post #8 of 18
Well, That makes you bias to their product,I still wouldn't eat them.Unless they were wrap with bacon and on a free buffett
post #9 of 18
i'm not bias to anything. I'm just telling you whats in them.

What scallops would you eat?? Most upper scale restaurants don't get product of that quality. I know.... for the same reason.....
post #10 of 18
The best scallops I ever ate ..I got from a dragger 65miles out for a case of beer ............He gave us a 5 gallon pail ........
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
I've done my research and have eaten my share of scallops and other fish. The Costco frozen are the real deal. I also know the difference between dry and wet scallops. And just because Zacs works where they process them doesn't mean he is biased. That would be like a chef not being able to say the food he cooked was good. He'd be biased
post #12 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by Crabman View Post
JB is correct to some extent. The juices are not entirely chemicals and preservatives. Most is scallop juice with a mixture of phosphates used in the freezing process to help the scallop retain liquid.

Back in my old days, I used to dredge sea scallops as a "day boat". Day boats got there name due to the fact, we were back to the dock the same day and the scallops were extremely fresh and never frozen. For our efforts, we got premium prices.

Large commercial scallop boats would stay out for days. Since scallops have a very short fresh shelf life, the scallops are usually frozen. In the freezing process, scallops are dipped in phosphates to allow them to soak up water before freezing so the loss of liquid in the thawing process does not dry out the scallop. Unfortunately, some scallopers found phosphates as a way of enhancing their catch weight. At times you can taste the phosphates. It's that funky, not quite ammonia/chemically taste. Over the years, the phosphates have been perfected to hide the taste. Also, the FDA regulates the amount of time scallopers are allowed to soak the scallops. The only problem, few scallop catches are ever checked.

For years, inexpensive frozen scallops (as well as many other frozen seafoods) have routinely been treated with phosphates, particularly sodium tripolyphosphate (STP), to reduce so-called "drip loss." STP and other related phosphates are GRAS (generally recognized as safe) food additives, and used in moderation, they help bind the natural moisture in seafood through the freezing and thawing process.

I've seen this process personally. A friend of mine is a processor of fluke. All his fluke fillets are dipped before being sent out, fresh or frozen. Scallops are the same. Many scallopers have been trying to hold unfrozen scallops longer by dipping them also. If you don't dip, the scallops begin dripping and the weight loss in significant.

The good news is dipping is GRAS or generally recognized as safe. The bad news, many times it's abused. I'm a scallop lover. For those of you who really love to eat quality scallops, find someone who deals in day boat scallops. There truly is a difference. If that is not possible, frozen scallops are acceptable. Over the past couple of years, the large commercial boats usually owned by corporations have forced the day boats out of the fishery. Day boat scallops, sometimes known as diver scallops and now we are seeing "chemical free" scallops are becoming harder to find. Due to the higher price for day scallops, large commercial vessels are keeping the last scallops of the trip separate as fresh to command higher prices.
What a shocker!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Capt Richie View Post
The best scallops I ever ate ..I got from a dragger 65miles out for a case of beer ............He gave us a 5 gallon pail ........
You lucky stiff!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bostonkeltic View Post
I've done my research and have eaten my share of scallops and other fish. The Costco frozen are the real deal. I also know the difference between dry and wet scallops. And just because Zacs works where they process them doesn't mean he is biased. That would be like a chef not being able to say the food he cooked was good. He'd be biased
They seem to be! My friend gets them and I have used them to make stuff with and can say they are fairly good.
I grew up on Nantucket, and after finishing my homework I had to help open scallops. I thought it was pretty cool, till it became slave labor. It still wasn't bad though, and we got to eat a lot of those Nantucket Bay scallops which are still considered to be some of the best going, as far as the bay scallop goes.
post #13 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by canyondiver View Post

.....and we got to eat a lot of those Nantucket Bay scallops which are still considered to be some of the best going, as far as the bay scallop goes.



For $27 a pound (even up here in season), they damn well better be..............
post #14 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by ZacS View Post
I can assure you with 100% assurance that the Costco "Kirkland Signature" IQF Sea Scallops are 100% dry, all natural, Grade A, Sea Scallops.

No chemicals, no preservatives, no soak. Period.

There are not too many places you can get a scallop of this quality.

The window in my office overlooks the production floor where KS scallops are graded,frozen, baged & boxed, so I would say I have first hand knowledge....


I'm not saying Kirkland dips the scallops. The dipping is usually done by the fisherman aboard the scalloper just after shucking. Scallops begin to lose water immediately, the phosphates are a sealer to retain the water thus increasing the yeild to the boat.

Zac, I don't doubt the fact that you don't see scallops being dipped and their is a slim possibility they are buying untreated scallops but I doubt it. Shucked scallops are too delicate and don't have much of a shelf life after shucking. If Costco scallops were truly untreated, why wouldn't they advertise them as "chemical free"? Wouldn't this be a real advantage in advertising their product?
post #15 of 18
I've been lucky offshore myself w scallops and sword trades for beer. In the mid 80's $3 would get a 50lb onion sack full of fresh caught (hookah) scallops in the shell down in the Baja.
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