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Striper migration map

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Has anyone ever considered using something like Google maps to track the bass migration?

You could zoom out at a sufficient level to prevent spot burning.

As folks catch fish they could stick a "thumbtack" in the general area.

As the fish migrate I'm sure the "thumbtacks" would tell the tale. I suppose the best thing would be to have them deleted after a week or two in order to show the summer doldrums and fall migrations as the affect certain areas.

I'd think this would be tremendously interesting to follow.
post #2 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by rocket500 View Post
Has anyone ever considered using something like Google maps to track the bass migration?

You could zoom out at a sufficient level to prevent spot burning.

As folks catch fish they could stick a "thumbtack" in the general area.

As the fish migrate I'm sure the "thumbtacks" would tell the tale. I suppose the best thing would be to have them deleted after a week or two in order to show the summer doldrums and fall migrations as the affect certain areas.

I'd think this would be tremendously interesting to follow.


Naw guys like me would throw in false thumbtacks just to mess you all up.
Nothing personal just business

Kind of like leaving striper scales at locations that are dead. Through off the posse.
post #3 of 23
Sounds interesting. I do recall seeing somewhere a map of the coast with what I can only describe as "thermal imaging" of the stripers' range during migration. With the red "hot" areas being around NJ - NC, then fading to yellow around their migratory routes around NY - NH, and fading to blue at the extremes of their range. Does that make sense?

Kind of along the same lines, I think.
post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 
That's exactly what I'm talking about. The locations only need to be general. Its really no more information than you could glean from calling a few bait shops up and down the coast or reading On the Water or something, but it provides a visual aspect to it.

Actually, someone like On the Water should put this together.

I'm sure some cagey folks would want to post false reports so you'd have to screen the data somehow, or limit the contributions to trustworthy sources.
post #5 of 23
Sort of along these lines, but the image I recall was much more detailed. Like a Google map with highlighted areas detailing what percentage of fish were caught in what locales throughout the year. I'll have to keep looking...







post #6 of 23
That might be more helpful if there were a single body of fish working their way up the coast. However, this is not the case. Groups of bass spend the winter in numerous different places - the Chesapeake, Raritan Bay, the Hudson, Housatonic, CT, Thames, Narragansett Bay, etc., all along the coast from Florida to the Gulf of St. Lawrence in Canada - and once spring comes they fan out in all directions, following bait movements and water temperatures in addition to their instinctual "migration" paths. While there's likely to be a large group of fish moving up the Jersey coast from the south, there are also fish coming out of the Hudson and Raritan heading the opposite way.

Like so many things in striper fishing, any attempt to oversimplify this reality is more likely to lead people astray than help them - suggesting that the fish follow a set path on a predictable schedule instead of responding to a complex variety of factors that change constantly - so instead of learning what influences their movements, why, and how those movements might be understood and possibly predicted in one's local area, we'd have people following a line on a map - misleading at best, downright inaccurate at worst.
post #7 of 23
People seem to think the "striper migration" is like an Atlantic City bus trip - it's not. They don't all leave at the same time - they don't all leave from the same place - they don't all have the same destination in mind - they don't all stick together - they don't even all migrate every year.



The striper migration is real easy - if you want to know if there's bass in your area feeding, check the water temp. When it gets to 48-50 degrees, the bass will be there. They migrate when they feel like it. Some follow bait, some follow water temp, some move based on length of daylight...some probably start for reasons we can't imagine.



Anyone the puts a thumb tack on a map and says that's where the migration is might as well put a dunce cap as they just labeled themselves a first class clown who knows nothing about striped bass migration



Short version? It doesn't work like that



TimS
post #8 of 23
Thread Starter 
You're missing the concept.

What I'm talking about would potentially be thousands or tens of thousands of data points.

You're right that a map tracking water temps would have a high correlation, though.

As bass move into an area, or even just start to feed in a particular area there would be many reports of fish caught- a cluster if you will. So long as you delete the old reports those clusters would shift around in some areas. In other areas the fish stay and reports would continue to come in.

The data collection is the trick of it, but the map would be very cool to watch.

You could, if you animated it, track the flow of fish up and down the coast over time.
post #9 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by rocket500 View Post

As bass move into an area, or even just start to feed in a particular area there would be many reports of fish caught- a cluster if you will. So long as you delete the old reports those clusters would shift around in some areas. In other areas the fish stay and reports would continue to come in.



The data collection is the trick of it, but the map would be very cool to watch.



You could, if you animated it, track the flow of fish up and down the coast over time.



The thing folks also don't realize is that most areas have bass all year long - so what you'd be marking would be where the conditions are favorable and the bass are feeding - or, more accurately, where the bass are feeding and people are fishing -- or to the next level, where the bass are feeding and people who don't know any better are reporting that they are feeding



TimS
post #10 of 23
Thread Starter 
Again, its no line on a map. What I'm thinking of is more akin to a water temp map- one of those color coded ones.

Lets say you went with a hot/cold theme.

Red would be an area where lots of fish are being caught. Blue would be an area with no fish being caught. There would be shades of yellow, orange, green, etc. for the in-between. These colors would shift around the east coast over the course of 12 months. If you animated it over the long term, you could watch the fish move around. I understand that it happens in a general kind of way and that they don't all take a plane from Logan to North Carolina in October.

I think by using the term migration I'm throwing folks for a loop. I am fairly well versed in what the stripers do by season. For example, the Thames River in CT would be a "red" zone in the winter because stripers hold over there.

Quote:
Originally Posted by EBHarvey View Post
That might be more helpful if there were a single body of fish working their way up the coast. However, this is not the case. Groups of bass spend the winter in numerous different places - the Chesapeake, Raritan Bay, the Hudson, Housatonic, CT, Thames, Narragansett Bay, etc., all along the coast from Florida to the Gulf of St. Lawrence in Canada - and once spring comes they fan out in all directions, following bait movements and water temperatures in addition to their instinctual "migration" paths. While there's likely to be a large group of fish moving up the Jersey coast from the south, there are also fish coming out of the Hudson and Raritan heading the opposite way.

Like so many things in striper fishing, any attempt to oversimplify this reality is more likely to lead people astray than help them - suggesting that the fish follow a set path on a predictable schedule instead of responding to a complex variety of factors that change constantly - so instead of learning what influences their movements, why, and how those movements might be understood and possibly predicted in one's local area, we'd have people following a line on a map - misleading at best, downright inaccurate at worst.
post #11 of 23
I understand what you are saying, rocket500. I didn't get the impression from your initial post that you were doing this for some sort of major scientific research. This sort of project would be interesting.

An accurate depiction of striped bass migratory patterns? Probably not.
post #12 of 23
US Marine Fisheries has estimated the population size at the beginning of 2005 was 65.3 million fish, with the 2001 and 2003 year classes (ages 2 and 4) accounting for 45% of the stock.



http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/sfa/state_f...toCongress.pdf



They winter off the outer banks of NC and move up the coast. MA/RI besides being 200 miles east of the outer banks, has extensive coastline/islands and the 3 mile rule extends further than in other east coast states.



In NC like other states it is not legal to catch stripers beyond the 3 mile limit and in NC very few 20-40lb fish have been caught the past couple of years because the fish have been 6-8 miles out. In the sounds and rivers, the stripers run much smaller. 3-5 lbs. being more average.



If the biggies are staying 6-8 miles off the outer banks, that means they are migrating past VA coast and into the waters or the Chesapeake Bay, Delaware bay, LI and Southern NE waters.
post #13 of 23
south shore of ny water temp 41
post #14 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Intrepid95 View Post
I understand what you are saying, rocket500. I didn't get the impression from your initial post that you were doing this for some sort of major scientific research. This sort of project would be interesting.

An accurate depiction of striped bass migratory patterns? Probably not.


I'm looking at it both as interesting science and also useful information to the angler.

As I said, buy using the term migration I think I was misleading. I don't so much care about individual fish or where they go, but what's happening with the fish in general and where.

What I really want to see is where bass feed and when, and over the long term. We probably could all ball-park it right off the top of our heads, but none of us individually know what's happening everywhere all the time.

If you could aggregate that data and then compare it year to year, overlay it with similar water temp maps, compare to timing of major storms, etc. I think this would be tremendous.

You'd be able to see, for example, that relative few fish were caught in a particular area one May when other Mays there were lots of fish caught. Then you could look at the water temps- too cold? too warm? Was there a major storm? See what I mean?
post #15 of 23
There are so many variables you would run out of colors or wind up with a modern art painting. If you do get it so that you can say fish here on such and such a date, let me know.
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