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Parabolic skis vs. Old school - Page 3

post #31 of 55

Quote:








Originally Posted by crashq
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I still have my old (school skis 202cm GS and 207cm slalom)[, but hafve rented a lot of demo parabolic skis. There are good and bad things about both of them. I consider them like the Original (bighead) Prince tennis racket or the huge perimeter weighted golf clubs. They make it easier to turn with a lot less hip angulation, so it is easier for beginners and infrequent skiers to carve nice turns. The shorter ski and deeper sidecut also make it easier for the pros to go straighter from gate to gate and make quick turns. This design is just an extension of the origianl deep sidecut skis like the first K2 Extremes with the 8.3mmm sidecut (later followed by huge 10mmm sidecut skis). Now that is a tiny sidecut.



I do think that your typical all-mountian parabolic ski chatters much more easily than the old school skis. It isn't noticeable at normal skiing, but try hitting 35mph on th frozen ruts and you will notice roght away.





The skis that the World Cup GS, Super-G and Downhill guys use are not your typical parabolic skis. Even the old school skis were slighlty different. A few years back (maybe 1995) I demo'd some World Cup Downhill skiis (223cm) for a speed skiing event. They were phenomenally stable. I could bomb through an entire run of small moguls with only a couple long sweeping turns with no ill effects. Incredibly stable! I made it to 85mph in the event.

Width does not necessarily mean stability. That huge sidecut that allows quicker faster turns with less angulation also means that it is easier for the ski to catch an edge and "wander"



I don't know the Outer Limits, but your average parabolic ski will chatter faster than your average old school ski at speed. Comparing race stock with that is like comparing an F1 Ferrari with a stock Corvette. I have personally skiid my old school GS skis and the run the same runs and courses on demo parabolics and noticed a difference on the bad stuff.

They are great under most conditions, but I like a less aggressive slighlty narrower ski for the really fast stuff.





Crashq – Most of us commenting are doing so from recreational skiers’ perspective. Those who race do use skis specific to that application. From my observations of the Okema Racing Team is that they prefer Vokl’s racing skis. The side cut, lengths, and tuning are very different than the recreational boards. But the overall shape is more parabolic than it was a decade or two ago and the lengths are shorter.

BTW, you 202 cm GS and 207 cm slalom skis would have been considered short in my day. I skied 205 cm in the bumps and 215 cm for slalom and GS.

Getting back into skiing after a 15 year hiatus has been a real eye opener. The clothing is less bulky and yet very warm. The skis are easier to control, the boots are much more comfortable, the bindings are integrated with the skis, and most everyone uses helmets. And even though the knees are not what they used to be, skiing is like riding a bike – I was very comfortable after just a ½ run from the summit.
post #32 of 55
Ski progression....

Rossi 170
K2 185
K2 SLC 204
K2 IV (my 1st shape) 193
Vokl G3 (current ski) 178
Rossi B3 (my woods ski/western ski) 173

Next ski.... Snoop Dog 168

There are soooooo many variations out there I'm getting dizzy.

Love my Vokls but I'm looking for something to get around quicker in the woods and the current powda skis can hold on the hard snow.

I bought the B3's used and they don't hold the hard snow worth a shite.
post #33 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by minivin5 View Post
Wrong shaped skis will chatter at higher speeds due to the shorter lengths. They are the ski industry's way of making skiing easier to compete with snowboarding.



I disagree. My G3s will hold on most everything.

If you're chattering, you're not using the ski correctly.

The shaped race skis will carve an ice sculpture.
post #34 of 55
The first time I used shaped skis I was over turning
it took a couple runs to learn to use less pressure
in da bumps dey r da balls
post #35 of 55

Quote:








Originally Posted by Wayne Tj
View Post

Crashq – Most of us commenting are doing so from recreational skiers’ perspective. Those who race do use skis specific to that application. From my observations of the Okema Racing Team is that they prefer Vokl’s racing skis. The side cut, lengths, and tuning are very different than the recreational boards. But the overall shape is more parabolic than it was a decade or two ago and the lengths are shorter.

BTW, you 202 cm GS and 207 cm slalom skis would have been considered short in my day. I skied 205 cm in the bumps and 215 cm for slalom and GS.

Getting back into skiing after a 15 year hiatus has been a real eye opener. The clothing is less bulky and yet very warm. The skis are easier to control, the boots are much more comfortable, the bindings are integrated with the skis, and most everyone uses helmets. And even though the knees are not what they used to be, skiing is like riding a bike – I was very comfortable after just a ½ run from the summit.





I see your point, I grew up racing and continued through college. My all mountain skis were 215 my DH boards were 235. Since the sport has taken speed out of the equation they are now producing a ski that handles better for the average skier, which is good to see.

When I raced DH and SuperG your speeds would approach mid 80's now with the tighter gates and shorter courses the speeds are in the low 70's. The Ski design has changed to the the needs of the athlete per event. The newer skis would never be able to maintain an edge at speeds of the old boards, just not enough camber in the new designs.
post #36 of 55
After hours of discussions with practically all of many friends, I mean all of them including better skiers than I, all praising the short parabolics to the hilt. I was dying to try them and did at a few demo sessions on the hill.

I tried and tried and tried but just hated them with a passion, embarrassing to say, contrary to contemporary thought on the subject.

If feel if you are an extreme skiier with a death wish, your wish will come true with these parabolics. If you are married extreme skier, consider them a widow-maker. Even on a tame slope, a sudden stop on hard packed chatters the tip and tail unlike a longer and exponentially more stable skis. Can you imagine this on steep rock and ice where ones heart can stop alone to the drama let alone on exponentially less challenging runs that will surely have you change your underwear and ski pants before the next run.

I also found zero difference in ease of turning as everyone suggested. Well trained newbies even call skiing with legs together old school which takes many years to acquire as does pounding moguls that actually do have an advantage with a shorter ski. (although I didn't try moguls with the hourglasses in all fairness)

I wish I could praise them, I wish I could be like everyone else who loves them to bits, I wish I had something nice to say for these slow deathtraps that would give extreme skiiers plenty of clients for medical practitioners and physical rehabilitation clinics for those lucky enough to escape para/quadriplegic lest death ... but I hate them on steroids.

Just finished waxing my old narrow Rossi 210's and looking forward to a great day tomorrow where I can bet I will arrive alive even though they are much much faster they have supernatural brakes relative to the parabolics. I am also scouting bargains on long skiis everywhere I can as they simply are not available in stores any more. Just these wide flat slow dangerous chatter runts and snow boards is all they sell.

Any extreme skiiers having any different experiences than me with all the new advertisements desperate for innovation?

In short, I found these newer shorter runs exponentially less stable and dangerous with no where near the speed longer skiis provide.

If they are used in competition, it is for public relations and advertising restrictions sake I suspect.

I would also like to see the stats on comparing times to previous Olympic events on the same course with these wider sponsored skis and perhaps increase of hospital visits where there is predominantly steep and ice in that area relative to traffic.

Sorry i wish I had something positive to say, if they are the new tobogan for easy cruising newbies and snowboarders, is one thing but if your life depends on the stability you are use to with a longer ski that bites tip and tail into the ice on extreme verticals, the choice is obvious, life or chatter and fall to death by a slower ski to boot. I can't think of one practical use for these skis aside from nailing them together to ake a sleigh to pull groceries. The are useless to me and god sent to others.... can't understand it...
post #37 of 55
If anyone knows anyone who is looking for a pair of never-used women's Atomic skiis, I have a pair. I bought them before my last car accident and I doubt I will ever be using them.
post #38 of 55
can anyone recommend a decent entry level ski for beginner to intermediate.
Been out of the game for 15 years, would like to get back on the slopes, something for New England conditions.
Was looking at K2 apaches or Head Railflex, too many choices out there.
I was a pretty decent skier until I switched to boarding then stopped all together, is there a learning curve with these new skis (new to me anyways)?
post #39 of 55
I am not a fan of my parabolic skiis. I turned quicker with my skinny skiis. But the parabolic are a little easier at the end of the day.

I am going to try a stiffer parabolic next to see if I like it better. I have owned 2 pairs of Atomic's and have not liked either one.

I used to like my "bermuda shorts" in the bumps and Rossi ST Comp for racing.

I will tell you the "Fat" skiis for Powder are the cat's meow. You don't have to work at all. I have not tried the really fat ones. Looks like 2 snowboards on your feet.
post #40 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinB View Post

Was looking at K2 apaches


Good ski. A friend of mine has them and I tried them for a few runs.
post #41 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by makomakoman View Post
Good ski. A friend of mine has them and I tried them for a few runs.

cool, they seem really affordable too, lot of combos with marker m2 bindings, big discount when they are a season or so old.
post #42 of 55
I forgot to add, his were the Interceptor. Not sure which Apache you are looking at.
post #43 of 55
Quote:
Originally Posted by makomakoman View Post
I forgot to add, his were the Interceptor. Not sure which Apache you are looking at.


season old sabres and some other lower level stuff, they seem to change the names every season
post #44 of 55
If anyone is interested I have a pair of K-2 195 8mm sidecuts fitted with Marker bindings I'm looking to unload. Two damaged rotator cuffs preclude me from doing XX black diamonds anymore. You can get 'em for dirt. PM for details if interested.
post #45 of 55
New skis have re-invented the sport. That being said, I ski on Dynastar Mythic Riders- 184s- 122 at the tip, 88 at the waist- fat skis for the fat man. Just bought a pair of Pro Riders- 190s- 128/110- look out...
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