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Pork loin rib roast... cooking time and temp?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
So I brined a pork loin rib roast last night, and I have it all dressed and seasoned.

I went with the apple concentrate brine that Steve has posted about many times. 1 container apple concentrate, 16 cups water, 1/2 cup Kosher salt. Crushed garlic cloves, peppercorns, a onion, and various sprigs of fresh spices.

The roast was coated with a spice paste consisting of 15 cloves of garlic, 2 tbs fresh sage, 2 tbs fresh Rosemary, some thyme, pepper, salt, and fennel seeds. That was all ground in the food processor into a coarse paste.

I am stumped on the cooking time though. The original recipe called for a boned shoulder roast, low and slow for 6 hours. I didn't realize that I read the cut of meat wrong until I was home from the store.

I don't think the loin will respond as well to low and slow. Less fat to break down with the slow cook.

I am having this popped in the oven for me while I am at work so I want to get the cooking temp and time in the ballpark because I won't be able to get to it until I get home.

I looked on line on the food network website and their recipe's range from 350 for 1 hour 45 minutes, all the way to 375 for 2 1/2 hours.
post #2 of 15
I am assuming bone in? If so, about 20 minutes a pound at 350, or until it is 140-145 degrees in the middle. I am also assuming that it is a CENTER CUT rib roast. If it is a shoulder end rib roast, then you are better off braising it in kraut.
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Steve, I am 95% sure it was center cut. I had to cleave off the back bone, and I left the ribs on the roast.

Hopefully it comes out well, if not I can allways make some mac and cheese and hotdogs for the kids lol. It was on sale for cheap, and I managed to score two real nice 5.99 beef rib roasts while I was there as well.
post #4 of 15
7-Rib Pork roast for brasing in kraut:



















Center Cut Pork Roast for roasting:



















Notice that the 7-rib has more internal fat and cartiledge, while the center cut has less internal fat, and contains a big "eye" of loin and part of the tenderloin.
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
Definetly center cut then! As allways Steve thank you for your help and patience with my often remedial cooking questions.
post #6 of 15
Steve,
That is a beautiful looking center cut!!
post #7 of 15
Definately take a page from Steve on the internal temp. If you let it go over 145 it will be dry. Trichinosis dies at 144 degrees so the carryover cooking will make it safe and juicy to boot.
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by david123 View Post
Definately take a page from Steve on the internal temp. If you let it go over 145 it will be dry. Trichinosis dies at 144 degrees so the carryover cooking will make it safe and juicy to boot.


i go a bit higher- usually to 150 or so

nobody has gotten trichinosis in years, but i don't like any except the very faintest pink hue to my pork

i have seen it served damn near medium rare, and i thought it was repulsive
post #9 of 15
Thread Starter 
Does it still look "done" if you pull it at 145?

If I was eating it myself I would definetly pull it at 145, but I am not quick to forget the grief that I get for cooking the girlfriends burgers and steaks medium.

I think I will pull it at 150 and hope that the overnight brine makes up for the extra cooking time.
post #10 of 15
The meat looks a bit pink when you take it out at 145. The carryover cooking time will increase the temp about 10 degrees if you take the roast out and let it rest under foil. . 150 would be ok too and the meat will be evenly cooked with juice and no pink in the middle. I like the pink. Not red mind you....no great amounts of blood running from the knife.

And if the GF complains, give her the end cut. You eat the good stuff
post #11 of 15
David.....my references say 136.....but whatever, 145 is safe.



Doug....at 145, and the carryover cooking, yes, it will still look a bit pink....tell the GF to get over it.....or better yet, have yours at what I said, and then blast some in the over until it is done to her "liking" (and is as tough and dry as shoe leather).....let her taste both, and then she will never go back.....



Pork over 150 as a finished, after rest temp, unless it is a cut that is done braised or slo and lo on the BBQ, is a travesty........
post #12 of 15
Steve

I was quoting a quote on the net that says the USDA says 144 kills the bacteria. It was the net and may in fact be in error, but I find that the 145 temp works for me as long as I take it out promptly. Pork will overcook in a heartbeat, as you know.
post #13 of 15
No issues, Dave ......I saw 136, 140, 145......and of course, saw some places that said to cook it to at least 160 to be safe.



As you said, 140-145 works for me as well, and then a rest to get to 145-150....



And besides, trichinosis in pork these days is very, very rare to begin with (pun intended), and is hardly an issue anymore.
post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 
Just an update. I ended up cooking to 150. I knew I was taking a risk but I was going to enjoy dinner better if every one ate their portion without making comments about it.

I pulled at 150, wrapped in a loose tinfoil tent and let it rest for 15 minutes. Carry over was only about 5 degrees or so. I think if I took it out of the roast pan it would have went up more? I think the roasting pan acted like a heat sink of sorts.

There was no pink but the meat was moist and wasn't chewy at all like overdone pork.

I think the brining really helped, I am going to do that in the future now. The pork was a little salty but I think that was from the herb paste, which will get half the called for salt next time.
post #15 of 15
I made one last nite...

Insert many slivers of garlic, coat with jerk sauce, "stripe" with slices of red onion.

Add par-boiled Taters, Carrots, remainder of onion. Sprinkle with Rosemary & ground black pepper. Add some chunks of butter.

Cook for a while...

Coat roast with Saucy Susan.

More butter on the veggies.

Cook until 140° Take it out & cover while the veggies are getting browned under the broiler.

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