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Magged Newell 229 Blackie - Page 3

post #31 of 35
I currently own 5 Newells from the old "G' series to the "C" series. I don't own the current series (P or S). All of mine have the graphite spools.

I really like the reels. I don't seem to have the thumb-burning problems that others do with the graphite spools. That is probably because I don't use much thumb during a cast and/or I cast shorter distances ( I max out at a little over 130yards measured) and my thumb is frequently wet when I am casting. Some have suggested that part of the thumb burning problem is noticeable mold lines on the spools which can be sanded off (I don't have those on my reels).

My likes are

1) Lightweight
2) Corrosion resistant - low maintenance
3) Easily maintained - all you need is a screwdriver and a nickel. I can strip them down lube and grease them and have them back together in under 15 minutes.
4) large line capacity for the size/weight
5) low spool inertia for added casting distance - graphite has lower inertia than aluminum spool.
6) Good drag. - the 200 series uses the same drag as the 300 and 400 series reels.

I liken them to a good basic truck. They aren't fancy or great-looking, but they get the job done and are dependable. They are basically improved versions of the original Penn reels. There are fancier reels and more high-tech reels, but except for the mags and brakes most of the added stuff is just reel porn to me.

They are fast reels which can create plenty of backlashes if you are just learning to cast conventionals, but that can be cured by using heavier oil (or even grease if necessary). If you aren't into old-school non-magged non-braked casting I wouldn't buy one unless you wasn't to mag it yourself.
post #32 of 35
from time to time. i still use my p220f to practice distance casting without any brakes.

use a p229f for big baits.

everything else. i use the inbetweens, daiwas, abus, penns.

for some reason, the ht100 drags + stainless internals... i find they have really good cranking power.
post #33 of 35

Quote:








Originally Posted by jcjunior
View Post

I currently own 5 Newells from the old "G' series to the "C" series. I don't own the current series (P or S). All of mine have the graphite spools.

My likes are

1) Lightweight
2) Corrosion resistant - low maintenance
3) Easily maintained - all you need is a screwdriver and a nickel. I can strip them down lube and grease them and have them back together in under 15 minutes.
4) large line capacity for the size/weight
5) low spool inertia for added casting distance - graphite has lower inertia than aluminum spool.
6) Good drag. - the 200 series uses the same drag as the 300 and 400 series reels.

I liken them to a good basic truck. They aren't fancy or great-looking, but they get the job done and are dependable. They are basically improved versions of the original Penn reels. There are fancier reels and more high-tech reels, but except for the mags and brakes most of the added stuff is just reel porn to me.

They are fast reels which can create plenty of backlashes if you are just learning to cast conventionals, but that can be cured by using heavier oil (or even grease if necessary). If you aren't into old-school non-magged non-braked casting I wouldn't buy one unless you wasn't to mag it yourself.





I agree with your likes. A Newell is my reel of choice on party boats or jettys. IMO the best Newells were the original P series. The metal side bands corrected the cracking problem in the blackie side plates, besides they looked better with that chrome.

Besides fishing I am also an auto and racing fan. When I compare a Newall and an Abu, they remind me of the old rivalry that existed between Ford and Ferrari. The Abu like a Ferrari was a sophisticated elegant European product with all the latest engineering developments. The Newell like the Shelby cobras (another product of those California creatives) wasn't as sophistocated but was tough, brash and ultimately reliable and victorious.

Unfortunately it seems the California design has remained static while the Europeans have kept innovating and moved on.

I don't consider some developments like the Ultra-Cast design to be reel porn. It's an excellent innovation which not only improves casting performance but can also allow a stronger reel to be built without affecting that performance. The spool is now floating on the main shaft. Since it is separate on a cast there is less inertia to overcome. In addition to improved casting a much stronger shaft can be used without affecting the spool. In fact a heavier main shaft my help by dampening harmonics of the rapidly spinning spool.

EC
post #34 of 35
EC...good write-up! ...

Poppy
post #35 of 35
Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagle Claw View Post

Unfortunately it seems the California design has remained static while the Europeans have kept innovating and moved on.


The reason for this is that Carl Newell Manufacturing is an industrial machine shop rather than a reel manufacturer. Google them and check it out. Reels are a very small percentage of their business. Carl started out by just modifying his Penns. Then his friends wanted him to modify their reels, and it grew from there. They were originally designed for casting stuff from party boats and flylining live baits, rather than surfcasting.

You can see his machinist background in the design of the reel. It is designed to be easy to work on and assemble/disassemble. Everything comes out of the reel still connected to the bridge plate. Take apart a Shimano Calcutta and then a Newell. Once you find the Calcutta's springs that are stuck in your carpet, you will appreciate the Newell's design. Also, the seemingly weak looking frame is quite strong because of its design and the fact that it is assembled and tightened in a jig. This is different from what many other manufacturers (not Abu) seem to think is the way to go. They start with a 5 lbs block aluminum and machine it down, when most fishing situations don't really need that kind strength. Big Game fly reels have landed blue fin over 100lbs without being anywhere near that beefy


Quote:
Originally Posted by Eagle Claw View Post
I don't consider some developments like the Ultra-Cast design to be reel porn. It's an excellent innovation which not only improves casting performance but can also allow a stronger reel to be built without affecting that performance. The spool is now floating on the main shaft. Since it is separate on a cast there is less inertia to overcome. In addition to improved casting a much stronger shaft can be used without affecting the spool. In fact a heavier main shaft my help by dampening harmonics of the rapidly spinning spool


As far as the "reel porn" goes, I was mainly referring to other "upgrades" (other than magging) or new models that were primarily for cosmetics or comfort, rather than actual casting improvements. Ultra cast is old enough that I wasn't really referring to it. You are right that calling it reel porn wouldn't be accurate. It was a valid attempt to improve the castability. As far as improving casting, that seems to be subjective (see the link below). At first glance you may think that it reduces spool inertia by disconnecting the spool from the shaft, but in many manufacturers don't put bearings in the spool because it actually increases spool inertia and slows the spool down. The weight of the shaft does not add hardly any inertia because its distance from the center of rotation is minuscule, whereas the added bearing weight is much farther from the center of rotation, thus adding more inertia. Although as guys, we always try to have the fastest, farthest, best, this doesn't always mean better. People who are using several brakes and mags are likely benefiting from added inertia, while others may not benefit.

As far as reducing the "harmonics" or vibration goes, I don't think the shaft thickness has that much of an effect because the change in shaft thickness isn't enough to reduce the flexing much. If it does anything, I think that it would simply change the vibration frequency a little. Who knows what the "harmonic frequencies" really are? I doubt that any of us really know. Besides, that depends on the entire system including line, which would vary from reel to reel. Also, the spool vibration is mainly the result of imbalanced line packing, which can change from cast to cast. I don't see it as a huge problem since the spool doesn't touch the frame anywhere, despite the close tolerances.

http://www.stripersonline.com/surfta...d.php?t=498154
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