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Looking to go first-time Carp fishing, located in MA.

post #1 of 40
Thread Starter 
I'm looking to go carp fishing for the first time.

I'd like to know a few things:

- Is this a good time/season to do so?
- What pound test should my line be?
- What type of bait should I use and how should it be put on the hook?
- What size hook?
- Bobber, Weights, or just hook/bait?

And where would the best place to do this?

I am in Worcester, MA. I can travel, though I'd prefer something that isn't more than an hour or so driving time.

Some local lakes *may* have them, but I haven't seen/heard of one being caught in recent years. I'd like to travel to somewhere that they commonly dwell, preferably with a large population.

I'm prepared to drive to any place near me, hike through woods, wade in a river, whatever it takes.

Now, they may smell rancid, but are they edible?

***I'd also like advice on catching larger catfish and/or sturgeon***

Thanks for any assistance you can offer me. Not looking to intrude on anyone's spot, just looking for a place to catch a carp, as I've yet to do so.
post #2 of 40
I'm in, only problem is i am from New Jersey. I also been thinking about carp,

never been fishing for them. Good luck to you, i hear they are fighters.
post #3 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buggle Lips View Post
I'm in, only problem is i am from New Jersey. I also been thinking about carp,

never been fishing for them. Good luck to you, i hear they are fighters.


As have I. I watched some YouTube videos of them being caught.
post #4 of 40
geez would you like someone to hook one and let you reel it in too?

half the challenge of carp fishing is finding the fish. where you go to look for them depends on what kind of fishing you want to do for them. i personally prefer to stalk them in creeks with light line and a noodle rod. they are a poor man's salmon when you fish for them like this. the ideal habitat for carp in a stream is in a relatively deep pool with some kind of cover, usually a downed tree or log. carp in streams will stay close to that main piece of cover and not roam very far from it for food.

in lakes and bigger rivers it is a whole different ball game. you have to heavily pre-bait a spot in order to have success most times. this means boiling 50 lbs or so of corn, taking it out to where you want to fish the day before you fish it, and then spreading it out in the area you plan to fish. this way, when you come back the next day the carp will be expecting food and hopefully still hanging around.

carp rigs are a whole different story. do a google search for hair rigs and bolt rigs if you want to learn more. ultimately, carp fishing can be as simple or as complicated as you make it, but you will dramatically increase your success if you do your homework on them.
post #5 of 40
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Romo7493 View Post
geez would you like someone to hook one and let you reel it in too?
do a google search for hair rigs and bolt rigs if you want to learn more.


I agree I did ask a lot, but I have no one to teach me, and no prior knowledge.

That bit with the names of the rigs is what I've been hoping for.

I also am unaware of any rivers/streams/brooks that have Carp near me. That will be my next challenge.
post #6 of 40
Look up "sliding float rig for carp" and study up.

You shouldn't have to use any heavier line than 10 pound test... I happen to use 6#... and it works fine.

Go to the crappiest looking piece of freshwater that you can find (a duck pond will do)... throw a handful of chopped corn in a deep spot (if it's legal in your state) and chuck that sliding float rig out near where you threw it.

If you don't catch a carp in the first half hour... there probably aren't carp there
post #7 of 40
yes, this is a decent time of the year to carp fish, youll still be able to catch them into the winter, but as is they dont move much, so it may take longer for one to bite

i use 4 lb test, if youre fishing in small streams the max you should use is 4 lb test

bait- id use corn, but theyll take a worm too

hook- i use a size 8 baitholder

bobber/weight-depeding on where youre fishing and how deep the water is, a bobber/weight may not be necessary...when i fish rivers i go with just a plain hook, because the bobber/weight smacking the water will frighten finicky carp, if youre fishing a large lake that is weedless id go with an egg sinker, if youre fishing a smaller pond, then a small bobber
post #8 of 40
Where in MA re you?
post #9 of 40
I'm in mass and go carp fishing quite frequently, i'd reccomend bread, corn, or the carp bait you can buy in packages. Try rivers, I landed 2 or 3 20 pounders on a small river canal. I got another one on the merrimack
post #10 of 40
oh yeah, theres almost no catfish in ma of any decent size so stick with carp
post #11 of 40
Indian Lake has some good size carp in it. From what I have read and heard it is best to bait them for a few days before hand in the same spot. Cat food containers with holes cut in them or special dougballs made with some stink. On The Water Magazine has had some articles on Carp in them.
post #12 of 40
Carp likes sweet bait, so stuff like whole kernel corns are good bait (you can buy the corn cans from the supermarket dirty cheap).

Also, carp does NOT like too much sun light, so if you go out during a bright day, try to find some shady area with deep water. The most active time of a day for carp is usually 1 or 2 hours before the sunset, early morning is the second best.

The last but not the least, chumming is a very popular way to attract carps to the small area that you're going to drop your real bait. I usually use the same stuff for chumming as the bait, such as corn, but I would smash the chumming corns to smaller pieces so that my real bait will stand out (in size).

Good luck!
post #13 of 40
Thread Starter 
I am located in WORCESTER, MA.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dinoboy123 View Post
I'm in mass and go carp fishing quite frequently, i'd reccomend bread, corn, or the carp bait you can buy in packages. Try rivers, I landed 2 or 3 20 pounders on a small river canal. I got another one on the merrimack


Merrimack is near Andover, correct? About an hour away.

Quote:
Originally Posted by dinoboy123 View Post
oh yeah, theres almost no catfish in ma of any decent size so stick with carp


I know what you mean. I had one that was decent, using relativity to the others I caught, but then comparing them to 20+ pounders, they're basically nothing. Largest was about 20", maybe 5/6 pounds a couple of years back with a worm on the bottom, mid day.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Tynan View Post
Indian Lake has some good size carp in it. From what I have read and heard it is best to bait them for a few days before hand in the same spot. Cat food containers with holes cut in them or special dougballs made with some stink. On The Water Magazine has had some articles on Carp in them.


Ever caught any there or any of those tiger muskies? I've seen them rising to the surface a few times. (Muskie, that is)

Quote:
Originally Posted by SurfGazer View Post
Carp likes sweet bait, so stuff like whole kernel corns are good bait (you can buy the corn cans from the supermarket dirty cheap).


Would I get canned corn, then simply cook it as I would to eat it, and dump it in the water a day or two before?
post #14 of 40
I have never heard of Tiger Muskie in that lake. I think you mean Lake Quinsigg. I have seen large Carp come out of Indian Lake. The lake off 190 by the Greendale Mall. Are you new to the area?
post #15 of 40
parts of Andover actually border merrimack, I also found good luck in the shawsheen river which is a tributary.
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