StripersOnline › SurfTalk › How-To Forums › Cooking Your Catch › Cherry peppers
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Cherry peppers

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I've got lots of cherry peppers growing in the garden this year. I'd like to jar them. Should I just keep them in the fridge in some olive oil? How long will they last? Does anyone have any good pickling ideas? thanks
post #2 of 11
great post.
I am also eager to read this one...
I was just thinking about planting some.
I can do that anytime due to the Florida climate
post #3 of 11
From our friend here Digger:





Large hot cherry pepper seeds (Burpee catalog #52951A page 105 current catalog)



Then grow the peppers



Wash the peppers whole,cut out the stem and and hollow out the seeds with a teaspoon. The more vein you leave in the pepper, the hotter the shooter will be.



I use a very good quality aged imported provolone cheese and chunk it up to about 3/4' square. Then I simply wrap the chunks of cheese in prociutto ham. I use a good quality domestic prociutto.

Place the shooters in a bowl and pour extra virgin olive oil on top. I also grind a tiny bit of black pepper and toss on a pinch of dried oregano. Don't submerge them in the olive oil, just enough to coat them well with about 1/2 inch of extra on the bottom of the bowl. Cover the bowl tightly and give it a toss once in a while.





If there is any secret about them at all, I would say to buy the drier rind slices of provolone cheese instead of the creamier slices from the inside of the wheel. The dryer chunks hold up better and don't mush up in the olive oil. Don't be afraid to buy the domestic prociutto. It's half the price of the best imported Parma and it won't make a bit of difference after marinating in the olive oil for a day or so. Just make sure that it's sliced painfully thin. I like slices that can be seen through.



I used pickled peppers for the food fling simply because it is winter and fresh cherry peppers from the garden are 4-5 months away

To pickle the peppers, I simply wash them and place them into a large jar and fill it completely with straight white vinegar and put on the lid. After about 10 days (not critical), pour out the old vinegar and replace it with fresh vinegar and add pickling salt to taste. Cover tightly and store in a dark cool place. To make the shooters, just clean out the peppers and rinse the excess vinegar off. Make sure that they are dry and proceed as if you were useing fresh ones.

Then eat a whole bunch of 'em.

Pickeled or fresh, They seem to get gobbled up pretty quickly.
post #4 of 11
A short comment...
Digger!!
post #5 of 11
I usually wash and just put them in a ziplock bag and freeze them. They are just as good as new when I use them.
post #6 of 11
Krusty.

I always put a case or 2 of pickled peppers.

I do it 3 different ways for different reasons...

The first way is for quick pickling so you can use them within a week. I like to remove the stems and seeds from these peppers, drain the vinegar out, hit them with a bit of olive oil and grill them and pile them onto a rare Black Angus NY Strip steak about 1 1/2" thick. .
Be warned... Eating grilled cherry peppers on a good steak with ice cold beer can be a religeous experience.

Wash the peppers leaving the stems on. Poke a slit into each pepper with a paring knife. I poke them up on the shoulder somewhere near the stem.
Stuff them tightly into clean widemouth quarts, add 1/2 teaspoon of pickling salt (or more to taste) and fill the jar with white distilled vinegar (5% acidity).
Put the jars in the fridge and top them off with more vinegar as it seeps into the peppers. If you have a vacumm sealer you can use it to seal the jars and the vacumn will pull the brine into the peppers quicker. It is not necessary though.


The second way is for sandwiches...

Slice the peppers and pack the slices (seeds and all) into wide mouth pints. Again add a bit of pickling salt to taste and fill the jar with vinegar. Seal and put in the fridge. I often mix an equal aount of sliced hot bananna peppers, sweet italian frying peppers and sliced hot cherry peppers for sandwiches. yum yum yum.

The third way is for longer storage over the winter. This way yeilds crisp cherry peppers for shooters well into the following spring.

Wash peppers and pack the into widemouth quart jars. Do not slit the peppers. simply cover them with with 5% vinegar. Put the lid on and place them in the fridge. After about 2 or 3 weeks, pour off the vinegar and replace it with fresh vinegar, add the salt to taste and put the jars back into the fridge. These will stay nice and crisp for a long time. I usually have them right up until the next harvest the following year.

I usually wait until I have a nice mix of ripe red peppers and green ones to mix in the jars.

A word about the salt...

Pickling salt is a very fine, high purity salt without binders or anti-caking agents. Useing regular iodized table salt may result in a cloudy vinegar brine as the additives do not dissolve fully in vinegar and it may cause your pickled peppers to darken in color.

Keeping them in the dark is important because we are not adding any artificial coloring or stabilizers. The sun will bleach them out. Keeping them in a refrigerator is the best way I have found to hold them for a long time.

Enjoy!

Digger
post #7 of 11
bump for pepper season

Quote:
Originally Posted by digger View Post
Ok Steve. from start to finish, Here goes.

Large hot cherry pepper seeds (Burpee catalog #52951A page 105 current catalog)

Then grow the peppers

Wash the peppers whole,cut out the stem and and hollow out the seeds with a teaspoon. The more vein you leave in the pepper, the hotter the shooter will be.

I use a very good quality aged imported provolone cheese and chunk it up to about 3/4' square. Then I simply wrap the chunks of cheese in prociutto ham. I use a good quality domestic prociutto.
Place the shooters in a bowl and pour extra virgin olive oil on top. I also grind a tiny bit of black pepper and toss on a pinch of dried oregano. Don't submerge them in the olive oil, just enough to coat them well with about 1/2 inch of extra on the bottom of the bowl. Cover the bowl tightly and give it a toss once in a while.


If there is any secret about them at all, I would say to buy the drier rind slices of provolone cheese instead of the creamier slices from the inside of the wheel. The dryer chunks hold up better and don't mush up in the olive oil. Don't be afraid to buy the domestic prociutto. It's half the price of the best imported Parma and it won't make a bit of difference after marinating in the olive oil for a day or so. Just make sure that it's sliced painfully thin. I like slices that can be seen through.

I used pickled peppers for the food fling simply because it is winter and fresh cherry peppers from the garden are 4-5 months away
To pickle the peppers, I simply wash them and place them into a large jar and fill it completely with straight white vinegar and put on the lid. After about 10 days (not critical), pour out the old vinegar and replace it with fresh vinegar and add pickling salt to taste. Cover tightly and store in a dark cool place. To make the shooters, just clean out the peppers and rinse the excess vinegar off. Make sure that they are dry and proceed as if you were useing fresh ones.
Then eat a whole bunch of 'em.
Pickeled or fresh, They seem to get gobbled up pretty quickly.

Digger


Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve in Mass View Post
Cool, Digger..... ..think I can handle the first part just fine.....the only pain is gonna be waiting another 5 months or so till harvest time..... .

One question on the pickling (for the ones I do that with.) When I make my "refridgerator" cucumber dill-garlic pickles, I bring the vinegar to a boil first, and then let it cool back down in the fridge. Is this necessary (or perhaps desired, and you didn't think of it), or is straight from the bottle good to go?

Okay, Seahoze and PCF, step up to the "plate" with yours.....


Quote:
Originally Posted by digger View Post
I bought a few books on pickling and preserving garden veggies and they sometimes contradict each other.
I've pickled peppers in straight 5% acidity white vinegar (best way IMHO), I've put the peppers in boiling vinegar and sealed with a 2 piece Ball/Mason lid. The peppers got soft, mushy and the color was lost.
I've tried boiling the vinegar and cooling it, without any apparent benefit. If I were mixing additional veggies like carrots, cauliflower, cucmber slices, and pearl onions (gardinieri ensalata) I boil it first, let it cool a little and pack it hot.
For whole hot peppers, just straight vinegar. Some of the best peppers preserved this way are pepproccini italian salad peppers (Robustini hybrid Jung Quality seed Cat#03079 page 51.
I also use the cold pack method for sliced hot pepper rings for sandwiches

I did forget to mention in the previous post that I cut a tiny slit in each whole pepper near the stem to allow the vinegar to get inside quickly.
Just don't forget to change the vinegar after about 10 days. It seems to help "set the color and keeps the peppers crunchy.

Digger
post #8 of 11
If I had a bunch of them I'd probably can the peppers in pint jars to save freezer space and might even add some onions and turmeric for added flavor.
post #9 of 11
I make them similar to diggers with stuffing them but i use smoked cured ham from my butcher. I then make a brine with pickling spices and white distilled vinegar with fresh garlic with kosher salt i pack the mason jars pour the brine over them and place in my canner for 25 minutes. I just finished my last jar from last october and they were as good as when i made them.
post #10 of 11
I stuffed two dozen shooters last night
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoGreco View Post
I make them similar to diggers with stuffing them but i use smoked cured ham from my butcher. I then make a brine with pickling spices and white distilled vinegar with fresh garlic with kosher salt i pack the mason jars pour the brine over them and place in my canner for 25 minutes. I just finished my last jar from last october and they were as good as when i made them.



Just a word of caution. Anything with meat in the process should be canned in a pressure canner for safety reasons. I know that the acid in the vinegar works to a degree and the ham has residual nitrates, but you are taking a risk using a water bath canner. Apologies if you are using a pressure canner, but the processing time tells me that you might not be using one.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Cooking Your Catch
StripersOnline › SurfTalk › How-To Forums › Cooking Your Catch › Cherry peppers