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what's a good knot for braid to mono leader?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
I've been using albright special or water knot. Thanks for any input.
post #2 of 28
The double uni....
post #3 of 28
I use a bimini to a back to back uni.....some use a bimini to a no name......both are good chioces in myopinion.
post #4 of 28
I am going to try the J knot from this article.



Two New Knots!



Try these easy-to-tie, super-strong connections for joining two lines.



By George Poveromo















The two knots developed by Dave Justice are ideal for joining a monofilament leader to super-braid line. Additionally, both connections are extremely strong, which can be important when it comes time to horse a snook (top) or striper (bottom) from mangroves, rocks or pilings.



David Justice is always looking for ways to make his terminal gear more bulletproof. A snook guru who has accounted for an impressive number of 30-pound-class trophies, plus a pair of monsters over 40 pounds, Justice places incredible strain on his tackle when he muscles these powerful fish away from docks, pilings and bridges. This was pretty much the same strategy he used to take trophy striped bass in the Tennessee reservoirs back when he was a guide.



Given the power of a big snook or striper, and the strain that a nearly locked-down drag places on tackle, Justice quickly learned which knots were worth their salt. So, when he switched to super-braid line a few years back, he experimented with different ways of joining braid to a monofilament or fluorocarbon leader.



Although Justice now lives in North Carolina and serves as the product manager for Stren Lines, he still makes several snook trips each year to South Florida. He remains as meticulous as ever when it comes to knots, and has since developed two new ones: the Stren knot and the J-knot. Both were developed for joining heavier mono or fluorocarbon leader to braided line, mono to mono, or mono to fluorocarbon. Since both knots retain nearly 100 percent of the lightest line’s rated breaking strength, they may in some cases eliminate the need for tying a Bimini twist or spider hitch in the end of the main line when using spinning or baitcasting tackle.



“I designed these knots for strength, so there would be no weak spots in the line after tying them,†says Justice. “I have worked on them for quite some time, and have checked them out on a line-testing machine and in the field on snook, stripers and tarpon. They really do the job. At a recent sales meeting, I used the Stren knot and the J-knot to join 12-pound-test Original Stren monofilament to 50-pound fluorocarbon. I tied three connections with the Stren knot and three connections with the J-knot. Every one of the six individual lines broke well above the knot. The knot strengths are incredibly high.â€



Justice claims that both knots are equally strong, and that it’s a matter of personal preference as to which one to use. Even though both knots are excellent for joining mono to mono and mono to fluorocarbon, Justice swears by them for braided line. In fact, both knots were developed with braid in mind, since Stren will soon introduce its own braided line (to be dubbed “Super Braidâ€).



“Knot strength has always been a big problem with braided line,†says Justice. “You can always find a knot that will retain 100 percent of its strength with mono, but not with braid — until these two knots were developed. And when tied properly, they also eliminate the problem of slippage.â€



STREN KNOT







According to Dave Justice, the Stren knot is considerably stronger than the traditional uni-to-uni connection used for joining thin-diameter braid to varying sizes of mono or fluorocarbon, providing the uni portion of the knot is tied in the mono or fluorocarbon. When making mono-to-mono connections, the uni portion of the knot must be tied to the heavier line.



Step One Overlap approximately 12 inches of the two lines. Take the tag end of the leader (A) and form a circle.



Step Two Wrap the leader two to six times around both the main line and leader, passing inside the loop on each wrap. This forms a uni knot. (Note: For four- through 20-pound mono, take six wraps. For 25- through 40-pound mono, take four to five wraps. For 50- through 80-pound mono, take three to four wraps. For 100-pound mono and above, take two to three wraps. If using a leader above 200-pound test, only one wrap is necessary.)



Step Three Cinch down the knot by pulling on both ends of the leader.



Step Four Form an improved clinch knot in the main line by wrapping it seven to 11 times around the leader (braids require ten to 12 turns), then passing the tag end through the opening at the base of the uni knot and back through the large loop.



Step Five Tighten the wraps of line while holding the tag end and standing section, making sure the wraps form a tight spiral with no overlaps. Slide them against the uni knot, jamming them together. Trim the excess tags.



Step Six The finished Stren knot.



J-KNOT







According to Dave Justice, the J-knot is similar in its initial stage to the surgeon’s knot, but progresses to an alternating weave on each side of the overhand knot. It is superior to the surgeon’s knot because the weaves will not cut into the main line. It’s a strong connection for joining mono or fluorocarbon leader to braided line, as well as for connecting mono to mono or mono to fluorocarbon.



Step One Lay the line and leader alongside each other, overlapping them by approximately 12 inches.



Step Two Treating the two as a single line, form an overhand knot and pass the entire leader through the loop you’ve just created.



Step Three Leaving the loop of the overhand knot open, pass the tag end of the main line and the whole leader back through the loop, around the bottom of the loop, up through the loop, around the top, and finally out through the loop.



Step Four For joining a mono leader to super-braid, make another pass around the bottom of the loop and out through the loop.



Step Five Finish the knot by pulling firmly on all ends, which will tighten the connection and make it more compact. Trim ends closely.
post #5 of 28
Alberto knot
post #6 of 28
post #7 of 28
Do a search in the bottom fishing forum, there was a whole lotta discusion just a few weeks ago.
post #8 of 28
I agree with westhavendave. The stren knot has held better than the uni to uni for me and its easier to tie than the alberto. Just my .02
post #9 of 28
Read the test done by sportsfishing magazine. They used the igfa testing machine to test just what your asking. All knots weakened the line by as much as 80% of the original line strentgh. The only way that maintained 100% of line stretgh was using a barrell swivel in between. This what I always did even before reading the article.
post #10 of 28
The stren knot looks just like a double uni...
post #11 of 28
I use an albright and haven't run into any problems.
post #12 of 28
Thread Starter 
thanks for the input. I'll try tying all and see which I like best.
post #13 of 28
Barrell,
If all knots weaken the line, why would the knots to the swivel be immune? And instead of 1 knot, you have 2. I use palomars to the barrell, but have been contemplating moving to the Alberto, I have been practicing it every day so I am ready to do it at night in the wind and rain.
1st Habs I lose, back to the swivel!
post #14 of 28
I beleive its because the braid cuts through the mono. When using the swivel you eliminate this contact. The article is on the SPORT FISHING website.
post #15 of 28
[1]
spider hitch and a no-name knot
[2]
spider hitch and a palomar knot to a swivel.snap.
[3 ]
double uni -knot
[4 ]
twistied dropper loop all dropper loop you tuck on odd mumbers!!!!!


Eddie
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