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Replacing a home thermostat...easy?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Looks like I need to replace my home thermostat. The house and thermostat are 10 years old. It not digital, just the kind where you slide the hot handle and cold handle to your desired temps. Is replacing a thermostat as easy as just hooking up a few wires? Can I run into compatability issues or will any replacement thermostst do the trick? Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 7
Degree of "easy" is determined by your system. Very important to match the new thermostat to the current system. Read the packaging carefully, take your time hooking it up and you should be happy with the results.
post #3 of 7
First you need to know if your Thermostat is Line voltage (110 vac) or "low" voltage (24-30 vac)

Telling the differance is not always that simple but typically low voltage will have smaller wires - red green yellow black. but a 110 v line voltage will have 14awg wiring - black white

once you have that answer then it is rather simple.

you could take the old one to the store and ask also.

IMHO - unless you are really going to set programmable one and leave it it is much easier to use the old reliable honeywell round thermostat.

do a google on replace home thermostat - that will show you all you need to know


V.
post #4 of 7
If its a control voltage thermostat its really easy. Most of your modern furnace thermostats fit into that category. If its line voltage, its usually 220 and you should be comfortable understanding 220/240v electrical systems before you putter with it too much. Most of your thermostats that control electric heaters fit into the line voltage category.

Make sure you have and know how to use a multimeter before you even pick up a screwdriver. Shut off the breaker if it is a line voltage thermostat, and know how to use the multimeter to verify.

Oh, also, when you screw the new thermostat back into the j-box, dont pinch any of the wires between the thermostat and the box. It results in a beautiful shower of sparks that cascades down the wall. Ask me how I know...
post #5 of 7
i hate to sound picky, but if your old one has a mercury switch you shouldn't just throw it in the trash....it is hazardous waste, and if your community sends its refuse to a co-generation plant, you will be adding to the problem of mercury contamination of fish
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by dogboy
i hate to sound picky, but if your old one has a mercury switch you shouldn't just throw it in the trash....it is hazardous waste, and if your community sends its refuse to a co-generation plant, you will be adding to the problem of mercury contamination of fish
When I replaced my mecury switch thermostat with a programmable one, I saved the old one. Came in handy one day when I somehow shorted out the new one with a zap of static electricity. The display still worked but the switch itself didn't. Started getting cold in the house but the heater wouldn't tun on. Put the old one back in and viola! Heat!
post #7 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Asbestos
If its a control voltage thermostat its really easy. Most of your modern furnace thermostats fit into that category. If its line voltage, its usually 220 and you should be comfortable understanding 220/240v electrical systems before you putter with it too much. Most of your thermostats that control electric heaters fit into the line voltage category.

Make sure you have and know how to use a multimeter before you even pick up a screwdriver. Shut off the breaker if it is a line voltage thermostat, and know how to use the multimeter to verify.

Oh, also, when you screw the new thermostat back into the j-box, dont pinch any of the wires between the thermostat and the box. It results in a beautiful shower of sparks that cascades down the wall. Ask me how I know...



220/240....Uh . never seen a line voltage stat that operated on 240V / 220v. Even heat pump/electric heat stats are 24 volts, not even 125 volts.

And changing a thermostat is not nearly as dangerous as your post speaks of. C'mon, its a thermostat not a friggin thermo-nuclear reactor here.

You must be sure the replacement is for heating/cooling and that it will accomodate the number of wires your old one does, take old one along.

Most important, turn off units that this stat controls and BE CERTAIN IT IS LEVEL...this is critical if it uses mercury. Just a hair off would be 5 degrees.

Also, IF it has a heat anticipator inside be sure to set the correct amps. that the old one was set at. J -box? Should screw right to drywall, paneling whatever your walls are made of.
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