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How to cast a big bait a 100 yards

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Hello from Ireland!

I looking for help. A few of us are pioneering shark fishing from the shore and we need to be able to bang a large fish bait out 80-100 yards from a rocky shore.

My own kit is a Penn 12' beachcaster linked to a Penn 535 laoded with 300 yards + of 25 lb b/s line. I have to put 60-80 lb shock *** rubbing leader on the end of this, and then attach the final trace.

Any help most welcome. We are casting into a deep gully between the land and an offshore island, strong tidal race and currents.

Thanks
post #2 of 22
Sounds like a good outfit. Switching to one of the 50lb braided lines, TUF-line, Power Pro, etc. will give better distance over the 25 mono.

gad
post #3 of 22
How are you attempting to cast this heavy bait? and what size lead are you using. and more important whatsize baits are we talking about? Are you able to use clipdown rigs? Knowing might put us on the right track 25lb mono is not out of the question for the distance your looking at. Big Dave
post #4 of 22
I haven't really seen shark surfcasting info on this site. The link below contains info on what people use for sharks in Texas. For sharks they often kayak out big bait (1 lb). Hope it helps.
post #5 of 22
Sorry about the link Tim S. The web page I posted was a link to was a feature article but the website that hosts it is in fact engaged in some commercial activity. That is in violation SOL terms of agreement. I didn’t want to just PM the link because it adds nothing to the board.
post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 
HI

Bait is either a large sand eel (greater launce is the correct name, like a small garfish without the beak) or a section of freshwater eel which the crabs will not touch, or most probably of all a cone of atlantic mackerel, around 10 cms / 4 inches long on a 6/0 hook. Weight will probably be a 175 gram / 6 ounce griplead as the current is strong in the gulley. Looking at several rigs, one a simple pulley with the bait clip built into the weight, another is an "up and over" with the bait clip again at the lead but with the trace wrapped over an inverted clip at the top of the trace... either way the bait will lie close to the lead in the casting position.

Hope this helps.

Thanks for the tip on the braid. My only concern with it is that a tope takes, it takes like a torpedo (usually on account of the early season fish all being male and packed in a shoal).

I am wondering if the mono in the rubbing leader would give me enough stretch to react to the first run (usually 50 yards plus)? Equally how does the braid deal with rocky and weedy marks?
post #7 of 22
If your fishing in a fast current use a fish finder rig [sliding sinker rig] on a steel leeder. I use a nail sinker [anchor sinker] to hold the bait in place in fast current. Use about 3 to5 feet of piano wire for the leeder and a 10/0 size hook.
Good luck and keep on sharking, Dave
post #8 of 22
Here's a great article on surf shark fishing and a castable shark rig from a guy who fishes Hatteras. I don't think the site is commercial in any nature so it should fit in the TOS. Mods, delete if necessary.





Quote:














You don't have to break the bank on gear while you learn about shark behavior and strategy. If you and your buddy (this is a team sport, son) are out on the sand after dark with a surplus of cutbaits, slide over to the hole where the gang was spankin' blues, spanish, or whatever on the ol' stingsilvers and proceed as follows:







+ Grab your favorite drum/cobia stick- the one with the 30-class or better reel on it. (Ideally, you'd have a Penn 555gs or Daiwa 50shv spooled with 30# mono stashed in your buggy for this stuff.)







+ Replace your pathetic 50# shocker with 100# (this combats the dreaded 'Tail Frap' and abrasion). At the very least, change the last 6ft.







+ Crimp up 12" of beefy 300# for a bite leader, and add an 8/0 or better circle hook (Rapala/VMC's 10/0 is inexpensive yet durable hardware). DO NOT use stainless steel. You want these hooks to rust to pieces after a day or two in saltwater. (see below)







+ Plop half a pogie, spot, or generic baitfish out there about 40-50yds on a standard fishfinder rig.







+ Hang on.







Plan on burning up hooks. It's a good idea to carry a pair of trauma shears or a release knife in your back pocket for quick releases. Sharks over 5' should be kept partially in the water to help support their body weight. Lacking rib cages, they don't do well high-and-dry while you stumble around for a camera, knife, pliers, or other trinket. Cut the leader as close as safety allows and help the fish back into deeper water.







If a shark washes back up, you're going to have to perform Carcharinid CPR: With a hand behind the dorsal and another near the base of the tail, walk the fish forward through the water until it swims off under its own power. Watch out for that tail.







You'll have a blast. Like that guy George Zimmer with all the suits says- "I guarantee it."















ps- Always think safety. A small biter can ruin a vacation, and if you're alone on the beach without a team-mate, it could ruin a lot more.















Beefed-up fishfinder rig. 300# Ande mono, 2.2mm double sleeve crimps, 250# swivel.






















Evan
post #9 of 22
I use pulley rigs for my surf sharking ,Jersey Brown sharks usually 50 to 100lb range. Clipping a hook to a impact lead can be difficult with bulky baits the solution is to crimp on the hook to the leader and form a small loop (1-2") where the hook is attached. You now clip on the loop to the bait clip instead of the hook and you don't have very many problems with the bait coming unclipped . See below.
Bigger baits need bigger weights to carry them out . 175g is about as light a weight as I will use and usually with smaller baits . Bigger baits I will use 190, 200 and 210g breakaways .We use a weight in the States called a frogs tongue and I will use these in 8,10 and even 12oz if needed. I use a zziplex Xtr and straight 8 as my surf shark rods. Although my biggest was brought in on my trusty zziplex 3500.
Browns will hit hard and fast like Tope and you have to fish a light drag to allow for the first hit . I like to use small lever drag reels for this, avet sx. Fish the light drag setting ,let the fish run and bang the drag to strike setting and will a circle hook almost 100% of my sharks have been lip hooked.
post #10 of 22
WOW Nice updates to a thread that is just about to become 6 yrs old
post #11 of 22
Duh , wonder if he ever got any Tope ?
post #12 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Dave View Post
WOW Nice updates to a thread that is just about to become 6 yrs old


LOL totally didn't notice that one.

Oh well.
post #13 of 22
12feet+approx. 6-8oz sinker+SKILL will give 100 yard easily.
post #14 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by westerly View Post
HI

Bait is either a large sand eel (greater launce is the correct name, like a small garfish without the beak) or a section of freshwater eel which the crabs will not touch, or most probably of all a cone of atlantic mackerel, around 10 cms / 4 inches long on a 6/0 hook. Weight will probably be a 175 gram / 6 ounce griplead as the current is strong in the gulley. Looking at several rigs, one a simple pulley with the bait clip built into the weight, another is an "up and over" with the bait clip again at the lead but with the trace wrapped over an inverted clip at the top of the trace... either way the bait will lie close to the lead in the casting position.

Hope this helps.

Thanks for the tip on the braid. My only concern with it is that a tope takes, it takes like a torpedo (usually on account of the early season fish all being male and packed in a shoal).

I am wondering if the mono in the rubbing leader would give me enough stretch to react to the first run (usually 50 yards plus)? Equally how does the braid deal with rocky and weedy marks?


Really sounds fascinating . . .
post #15 of 22
Nick meyer from breakaway U.S.A. always comes up with great stuff.
He has the guess work done allready. Use his clip down pulley rig design,
custom rods and his casting techniques and you're pretty much there.
Here are A couple u-tube videos of him in action. The back cast is
something that is suppose to be able to take heavy leads, big baits
and place them at far distance. His how to videos will help open up
your options on what you're looking to achieve.



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