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Oregon Stripers

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Any board members from Oregon that Striper fish there?
post #2 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by STURGEON GENERAL:
Any board members from Oregon that Striper fish there?
Oregon
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
State record 68 LBS!
post #4 of 19
where in Oregon?
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Not sure were the record was caught but Coos Bay and the rivers that feed it as well as the lower Umpqua river system have bass,as well as the Coquille river.Fish are also caught in the surf areas closed to the river mouths.
post #6 of 19
Yes SG. Oregon stripers do exist. But are not a targeted species to most who live there. Some believe (me included) that these fish co-mingle with our populations and as a Eastcoast implant you'd tend to understand the distance these fish will cover. Unfortunely they are considered a pest by most Oregons. Last year after hearing a report on fish. I took a trip up the coast to Cresent City and fished for them. Though I found some guys throwing lead around a jetty none seemed to keen on what they were doing. My initial plan was to work my way up to Coo's Bay fishing likely looking beaches. Instead I called an old friend who lives up there and the call of the Smith river removed my striper hunt from my mind.
I might try it again this year if the funds are availble.
post #7 of 19
Thread Starter 
I know what you mean Winch about stripers and the distance they will travel.East coast from CHEAS. bay to the Carolinas and North to Maine.The Hudson river was also a place that supported fish populations i believe year round back before heavy pollution took its toll. I wonder if the oregon bass came from here or if they were planted.I did read that they are very inbred and many are hermaphrodites (for real,no joke).My guess is they must have moved north when there were lots of fish here and kind of really never flourished due to climate or comp. from other species and have dwindled and become inbred.
post #8 of 19
SG the stripers were from what I remember migratory fish that moved up that way. Yes I also heard of the imbred theroy but do not believe it's true. (Like I said they are thought of as a nuisance fish to them willing nilling Salmon lovers up there.) If you go back in the westcoast post around January of last year you can find the small thread we had with a guy up by Cresent City and one of my trip up there. He posted for a bit but then stopped. Not sure if he found the mother-lode or thought it wasn't worth the effort.
Kind of interesting information. I do have a friend who became a biologist for F&G. He went to Humbolt State to earn his degree and had dealings with guys from Oregon. From his buddies in Oregon I learned that the fishery did exist and the fish were healthy. Too healty in their eyes. My friend the biogist also expressed to me the theroy of migratory winter fish back in the 80's.
AS for fish quality the guy who was on line with us told of 20 pound class fish being taken in Cresent in January! Dosen't sound like imbred fish to me. Sounds like healthy strong fish to me. My first thought were these fish were from Coos but the more I reasoned with myself I wondered if these fish were actually from S.F. fishery. With fish this year showing off the coast here in Febuary and March laden with eggs made me think perhaps an unstudied group of fish wintered in the Ocean. If this is so then the Coos bay fish which also spend winters in the open surf spend time mingling with the SF fish. Thus the thought of no new blood is foolish. Besides our fish come from a few hundred fish that were brought here by rail cars from NJ, shouldn't we have an imbreded hermadite fish population too?
How could these fish be a unknown colony? Well First off there isn't the studies that go on back east, second if you have ever driven the North Coast you will find very little easy access to fishable water. There are places where there are no roads near the water, steep cliffs and miles of private property. There is also large area's of either low population, or infact no populations. This leads to little chance of people accidently discovering these fish. Even if so what if any media is there to follow up on these fish stories?
So its a mystery, where these fish Coos fish or in fact a group of migratory saltwater living striper population. Think about it could these fish have always been out there or is it more like the findings Moocks posted on another thread about freshwater diversions turning the Bay's brackish waters into a Marine estuary. Could these fish as an act of survival changed into a saltwater wintering fish?
So my thought is that this January if possible, when the seas are calm, I'll retake that journey up North. This time however I won't get sidetracked and head inland to awesome steelhead and trout fishing and put a week into this mystery.
post #9 of 19
ahhh your gonna go get drunk with Nick!!!
post #10 of 19
Thread Starter 
I would think tagging programs both here and up north could answer questions about migrating bass populations.I also read stripers are found as far north as B.C. Canada on occasion.Interesting stuff.
post #11 of 19
That was some good reading you guys.
post #12 of 19
I was told by a striper fishing guide that those Umpqua/Coos Bay stripers were planted fish. I also heard from some researchers at Longs Marine lab (UCSC) that some of the big fish in that fishery were hermaphrodites. I have no solid proof to back this up, its just stuff I have heard over the years. There is a fellow at UC Davis I will soon be talking to who probably can give us some accurate info on the Oregon stripers.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by johnnys rock:
ahhh your gonna go get drunk with Nick!!!
Did you run over that deer yet Geronimo?
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally posted by Mike Fixter:
I was told by a striper fishing guide that those Umpqua/Coos Bay stripers were planted fish. I also heard from some researchers at Longs Marine lab (UCSC) that some of the big fish in that fishery were hermaphrodites. I have no solid proof to back this up, its just stuff I have heard over the years. There is a fellow at UC Davis I will soon be talking to who probably can give us some accurate info on the Oregon stripers.
Mike my take was on those fish in Oregon that they were planted from the San Francisco area? Yet with fish found out of the Russian and fish at Cresent drawing the line isn't that difficult to imagine. They have even been caught in San Diego. Let us know how it goes with the bioligist.
post #15 of 19
Here is the picture of Cresent beach in Cresent City. Place where the fish were supossedly caught.

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