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Hand poured soft plastic swimbaits... is anyone here doing it?

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
What would be the basic equipment and technique to replicate soft bodies like the ones AA makes? http://www.aaworms.com/

My main complaint about most of these factory made handpoured lures are that unlike those injection molded these are easier to tear apart. Some are so soft that they break apart during the cast when trying to cast them close to 100 yds using 3 oz heads.

I believe that there is a hardener. To what extent does this help?

Thanks for your comments.

Sergio
post #2 of 26
Sergio, check out Got Stripers atricle page, he wrote some good stuff about that.
http://www.rgsiroisco.com/plastic.htm
post #3 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your quick response slipknot.
I will check it out.
Sergio
post #4 of 26
post #5 of 26
Got Stripers,

Excellent aticle. Does the Bondo flow nicely to get detail in the molds?

[This message has been edited by Oznavad (edited 11-29-2001).]
post #6 of 26
Sergio,

If you are interested in making your own soft plastic lures, try lure-craft. Their website is at www.lurecraft.com You can order a catalog free when you go to their website. The catalog also gives step by step instructions on how to pour the plastic etc. Hope this Helps. . .

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BASSHOLL

[This message has been edited by BassHoll (edited 11-30-2001).]
post #7 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thank you very much for the info, you have been very helpful.
Being here in Mexico complicate things when you run out of some particular lure and the possibilities are enormous after reading these posts.
Sergio
post #8 of 26
Sergio
I have been pouring my own plastics for about a year now. Have several molds from Lure-craft. You can buy softeners and you can buy hardeners for the plastic. By the way, lure-craft has the best price for 5 gallons of plastic. Even with shipping it is still a good deal.
I even bought some special sticky plastic from China that will give you plastics that are stretchy. I mean "very stretchy". You can actually jerk the plastic bait, and it will strectch underwater. The problem is though that it is very difficult to melt and it also smokes. But the action of the lures is amazing, especially since you don't need to impart as much motion to them.
post #9 of 26
Dan S -

Can you get the name of the plastic, the part number, and the name of that company in China and post if for me please. No rush - whenever you have a few minutes to spare. I'd like to give it a try. Sounds great. Thanks.

[This message has been edited by Uncle Matt (edited 12-01-2001).]
post #10 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the tip Dan.

My main problem with soft plastic swimbaits is that I tear them during the cast. I have found very few soft swimbaits of 4 - 6" that can stand being casted +100 yds with a 12' rod. In Mexico it is very hard to find lures or in this case plastic swimbaits, but we did have here available and injection molded type that could stand the pounding of a powercast. I can no longer find this plastic here and that is bad as it was a good one. The best one of the probably more than 100 different types I have tried.

I think that if the design is appropiate you do not need a very soft body to see that tail moving from side to side and also when the bite is fast and furious, sometimes changing the body will stop it for a while. I prefer to keep casting that mangled but still swimming body than put a new one. Dont ask me to explain why this happens, but it happens very frequently, so I prefer a firmer lure that does not tears as easily as those that do everytime a fish is caught.

I can see that there is an additive that can make a firmer body that will not tear as easily. Can somebody comment about this addtiive?

Thanks

Sergio
post #11 of 26
Try the lure Craft link that BassHoll suggested. They have several different types of plastics, including one for saltwater, that you can use in molds. Also a hardner to make the bait a little stiffer. Have only used this stuff in freshwater, so I really cannot comment on how well it would work for saltwater. They also carry a number of molds for making plastic baits. Probably one that would suit your purpose.

Jigman
post #12 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by Oznavad:
Got Stripers,

Excellent aticle. Does the Bondo flow nicely to get detail in the molds?

[This message has been edited by Oznavad (edited 11-29-2001).]


Sorry guys I haven't checked this board in a while. The bondo will get into whatever detail fiberglass resin will flow into. But I doubt there is a fish alive that would give a rat's *ss if most of the detail on baits is picked up. I'm 100% convinced of a couple things in life, taxes s*ck and fish are dumb. Bondo works good enough for my purposes and my guess is good enough for most. I'm going to hit a few resin companies over the winter, to see what a formula would cost to get a mold similar to the soft ones Lurecraft sells. The advantage is you don't need to spray those with a release (span) before pouring. The drawback is that mice apparently like them , found one chewed up this weekend.



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Tight Lines
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally posted by Sergio:
Thanks for the tip Dan.

My main problem with soft plastic swimbaits is that I tear them during the cast. I have found very few soft swimbaits of 4 - 6" that can stand being casted +100 yds with a 12' rod. In Mexico it is very hard to find lures or in this case plastic swimbaits, but we did have here available and injection molded type that could stand the pounding of a powercast. I can no longer find this plastic here and that is bad as it was a good one. The best one of the probably more than 100 different types I have tried.

I think that if the design is appropiate you do not need a very soft body to see that tail moving from side to side and also when the bite is fast and furious, sometimes changing the body will stop it for a while. I prefer to keep casting that mangled but still swimming body than put a new one. Dont ask me to explain why this happens, but it happens very frequently, so I prefer a firmer lure that does not tears as easily as those that do everytime a fish is caught.

I can see that there is an additive that can make a firmer body that will not tear as easily. Can somebody comment about this addtiive?

Thanks

Sergio



I sent you a pm. In addition to pouring your own baits and fooling around with the hardness, you might want to look at how your attaching the bait in the first place. I've post my preference before, but here's another look


Now my fishing is on rock ledges and I want a horizontal presentation, more of a sprial on the fall during a pause, more realistic action and that's why I weight my baits as shown. This combined with a 90 degree jig hook, mean a screw lock gives me a great way to hold the bait and also almost make this rigging snaggless.

If you need lead to get those 100 yard casts, but still want the advantage of a screwlock, then I'm sure certain style or size lead head jigs would lend themselves to this approach. Others use superglue, but I say why bother, then the baits get ripped off with a hunk left on the head.

Let me know if I can help.

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Tight Lines
post #14 of 26
Got Stripers,

I agree on the "fish smarts" comment. My question of detail was not related to putting scales (or other useless stuff) on rubber, but related to pouring something similar to what you just posted. The bottom rubber with the split tail. That is similar to what I was interested in molding and I was confused as to how I would get that split tail to mold nicely. I don't want to bore you with details until I actually attemp a few. I'm sure a little trial and error will help me understand better.
post #15 of 26
The more detailed the mold, the more time consuming the pouring process becomes. I go back to the dumb fish comment, only get as detailed as you really need to be. The split tail is actually a frankenstein creation, melting together a beetle spin, some sluggos and some work with a hot butter knife to shape it. Once you have a prototype, you might even want to consider a small cheep plaster of paris mold first. That will allow you to turn out a few and fish them, then if they work well then you go for bondo and glue down enough to make it productive. This is a picture of the bondo mold of that simple, yet extremely effective 7 inch slab bait.


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Tight Lines

[This message has been edited by Got Stripers (edited 12-02-2001).]
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