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Remington model 742 woodsmaster? - Page 5

post #61 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bass Ackwards View Post

The 760 is a pump that was replaced by the 7600 which I own.

Good, I always mix 'em up 742,760,7600,7400 etc.

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post #62 of 81

    I purchased a 742 from a pawn shop for $175 because it had an old tasco WCP 4x44 with see thru mounts and I figured even as a single shot 30-06 that was acceptable and a lot better than $400 for entry level new gun with iron sights...When I first shot it it wouldn't eject and it danced all over the place...so here's what I did

 

    First I took of the barrel and used wet dry paper 1500 with silver polish to clean and polish the chamber...worked my way up to 2500...

 

    Then I reinforced the bolt lock by placing a no. 8 shot under the middle pin and spring on the bolt.  Be very careful if you do this as I lost the spring and by sheer luck was able to relocate it with a magnet.  BE VERY CAREFUL...you can learn how to do this by typing in woodsmaster 742 on google and you'll find a web site called wisnersinc.com. This site is how I learned to do most of what I did to this gun, which is now a fine firearm and just took a deer with it. If you perform this task shake both of the tiny springs and pins out of the bolt and place them in a zip lock until you are ready to reinstall...you can not buy new ones so you better be careful...I got lucky...The site says a number 7 shot but I used 8 and it worked great. This increases tension on the bolt latch as to keep the bolt from rotating and hitting the rails.

 

    Next I took the forearm off and dremeled anything that looked like it even came close to the barrel...Then I attached hook and loop velcro to the bottom of the gas block, it's the little block of steel attached under the barrel about half way up the barrel...it's the only thing you want touching you forearm.  I put about an inch of velcro (window sealant tape would work to) on the bottom of the block to push the fore arm away from the barrel...now its like this little cushion the the barrel (gas block) rides on.

 

    Next I reinstalled the forearm without the fancy little white spacer or the metal piece it fits in because they would rotate and touch the barrel...it's about barrel harmonics...so I left those off and only used the forearm bolt with the big washer...I put lock tight (blue) on the bolt and tightened until snug...then I backed off 3 full turns...The forearm will be a little loose so when I shoot I just pull the forearm into me and there's no problem. Also when you reinstall the barrel use just a little lock tight to keep it snug. If the bolt is tight it shoots crazy.

 

   I put two shots at 2 3/4 apart at 150 yards, both shots were about 1 1/2 inches from dead center, and did this with a 4x scope...I also put an extractor on it for $25 dollars...you should take that job to a gunsmith...they'll charge you about $15. I did it myself, trust me, take it to a gunsmith...You have to clean the chamber every 10 or 15 rounds or the brass will stick. It's for hunting so I'm fine with that.  Since others shared their experiences and it helped me I wanted to share mine...

 

   

post #63 of 81

When I said if the bolt is too tight it shoots crazy I was talking about the forearm bolt...make sure you tighten the barrel nut tight...you can buy the tool or just use an adjustable wrench or pliers like I did...

post #64 of 81

Well, I thought about starting a new thread, but this one seems to be alive and healthysmile.gif

 

I inherited a 742, 30-06 from my grandfather about 25 years ago. I fired it a few times, but after getting married my hunting days dwindled and I retired it. That was 20 years ago. Before retiring it, it began jamming. I took it in to a gun shop who pretty much told me to junk it and I really hadn't given it too much thought. It's been in my closet since. Back in the 80's there was no internet to find all the great information you can find on it today! Over the pas couple years I've been reading up on the bad reputation the gun has due to wear. I've been thinking that I've probably at the most only put 40 rounds through it and my grandfather likely didn't put much more than that.  The other day I got a wild hair and disassembled it for a good cleaning and noticed the bolt latch was broken in half and the bolt latch pivot was missing. I ordered and received both parts. While reassembling, the bolt latch keeps sliding back and the pivot and spring falls out. The last attempt, after the latch slid back and the pivot pin came out, the spring got bent....so looks like it'll be another $10 for a 2 cent item (but feel lucky I can still get one!).  So here's my question-What am I doing wrong?    btw, there's little obvious wear anywear.

 

Before someone says, I was was stupid for trying to repair myself, idiot for not taking to a gunsmith right away,etc, it's been retired for 20+ years, and I'll not be taking it back in the field again. That said, I would like to have the rifle in firable condition for sentimental reason, but I really don't want to break the bank doing it or spend more that it's really worth. And yes, I know it's tough to put a price on sentiment, but I still have to be reasonable.

 

Also, my beautiful wife wasn't the reason I don't spend much time in the woods with my guns, it's just the way life goes with other priorities.

post #65 of 81

mmdt101...it sounds like you need to be more patient when putting it back together...I've taken mine apart several times before getting it how I wanted it and it always seemed like it was a lot harder when I was tired or went too fast...when I just took my time and rolled with the punches it worked out pretty good...There's a fat pin on the side of the bolt  that slips out if your not careful,  the bolt seems to come apart if your not careful...put the bolt together and push the latch down and slide the back part of the bolt over the latch so the two pieces of the bolt are as close as they'll go and when you get it in the receiver all the way, that's when I stop and put on my dust cover, then put your handle in and the pin and your ready for the barrel...it's a very finicky gun to get to shoot right *

 

(*edited - we don't allow soliciting, buying or selling here - TimS) 

post #66 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by mmdt101 View Post



Before someone says, I was was stupid for trying to repair myself, idiot for not taking to a gunsmith right away,etc, it's been retired for 20+ years, and I'll not be taking it back in the field again. That said, I would like to have the rifle in firable condition for sentimental reason, but I really don't want to break the bank doing it or spend more that it's really worth. And yes, I know it's tough to put a price on sentiment, but I still have to be reasonable.

Also, my beautiful wife wasn't the reason I don't spend much time in the woods with my guns, it's just the way life goes with other priorities.

I'm a machinist and I've worked on machinery for > 45 years.

I've done my own gunsmithing for ~ 35 years.

In a quiet room, with NO distractions, take your time as you study schematics.

Be patient.

Blow the schematics up so you can see parts' details clearly.

Study the operation of mechanisms and each mechanism's parts.

Study the shape of each part and how that shape relates to other parts.

As you disassemble parts, make a drawing of how the parts fit together.

On your work table and in the palms of your hands, put the disassembled parts together to understand how they function together in the mechanism.


Good luck.
Edited by lichum - 1/2/12 at 7:01pm
post #67 of 81
As with French cars, I was warned early and often to stay away these rifles, I will add to Lichum's general insights.

Sometimes what is needed is a "slave pin" - a pin to hold a part or sub assembly together while it is installed into the receiver, once in position, the slave pin is then pushed out and replaced by the 'normal' pin, pinning the assembly inside the receiver.

A digital camera is invaluable for taking pictures of the way parts were, before disassembly.

You tube has lots of homemade videos, sometimes you get lucky.

As a second to last resort AGI has "Armorers Videos" for many popular guns, I have the one for the Browning A-5 , it's excellent. Check MidwayUSA and Brownells.

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post #68 of 81
Previous post (#46) gives you a link which has a fair amount of info on these weapons.
One of several men, more than likely with two hands and who put his pants on in the morning one leg at a time, designed, manufactured, finished and assembled your gun.
With a little guidance and patience, you can probably figure out how to perform most minor gunsmithing tasks on your weapon...certainly cleaning and general maintenance.
If not...there are professionals for this sort of thing.
Having said that...I have seen some rueful messes over the years.
post #69 of 81

Hi guys, I have a 742 in .30-06 that sticks open on each shot.  I would like to know if someone has had any luck with smoothing up the grooved in rails in the receiver that hang up the bolt.  Is there any other remedy that you might suggest?

 

post #70 of 81
2001....2008...2009...2010....2011...2012, Who a thunk it. Strange.
post #71 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by accuracysports View Post

Hi guys, I have a 742 in .30-06 that sticks open on each shot.  I would like to know if someone has had any luck with smoothing up the grooved in rails in the receiver that hang up the bolt.  Is there any other remedy that you might suggest?

Try a new mag.

cwm8.gif

Keep the 742 dream alive
post #72 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattb View Post

I'm hoping someone can help me out here, i've done some searching and info is pretty hard to come by...


Last sunday I was out sighting in a new scope on my .308 model 742 and after about a dozen shots the action refused to close all the way(it's an automatic). I couldn't figure it out after fiddling with it for a bit, so I brought it to a local gunsmith sunday night.


He told me that what I was seeing was a common problem with the 742's and that my best option was to throw the gun away and buy a new one. This seems a bit extreme to me, but he maintained that it was the only thing to do, apparently most trading posts have stopped taking them because of the problem.


He also mentioned that a few years ago remington may have offered a discount on new rifles with the exchange of a faulty 742, but he didn't have any details.


Has anyone here run into this problem with the 742? If so, how did you deal with it?


Thanks,

Mattb

I don't know much about the 742 but if ya decide to keep it I have some nice 7.62 x 51 LC NATO ammo for sale.
post #73 of 81

One of the most common problems with the 742 and 7400 was headspace.  Once it's off it will jam and bend extractors and cause all sorts of problems.  I've seen plenty that have went to gunsmiths for a quick fix and then start having problems again just a  few rounds after leaving the shop because the gunsmith did not bother to check the headspace. The 760 Gamemaster is the pump version and allows you to chamber and eject rounds without the force and speed of an auto thus making the cycle of action a lot easier on the receiver components. The 760 Gamemaster was produced first in 1952 and then 3 years later Remington decided to make an auto version of it in 1955 as the 740 Woodsmaster and it was superseded  in 1960 by the 742 Woodsmaster and then discontinued in 1980. I believe it was resurrected in 1984 as the 7400 and discontinued again in 2006. However, I believe the 7600 which is the pump model is still currently in production.  Remington 760 Gamemaster: Creating vacancy at the Lorraine Motel since April 4, 1968. I would buy a 742 Woodsmaster. I know several folks who own them.  There is a big difference between being a firearms owner and a firearms enthusiast. Anyone can be a firearms owner when someone bequeaths them a rifle. I know men who can't change the oil in their vehicle much less properly maintain a firearm.  "Some people go through life wondering if they've made a difference, Marines don't have that problem."  Ronald Reagan.

post #74 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lance Colonel View Post

One of the most common problems with the 742 and 7400 was headspace.  Once it's off it will jam and bend extractors and cause all sorts of problems.  I've seen plenty that have went to gunsmiths for a quick fix and then start having problems again just a  few rounds after leaving the shop because the gunsmith did not bother to check the headspace. The 760 Gamemaster is the pump version and allows you to chamber and eject rounds without the force and speed of an auto thus making the cycle of action a lot easier on the receiver components. The 760 Gamemaster was produced first in 1952 and then 3 years later Remington decided to make an auto version of it in 1955 as the 740 Woodsmaster and it was superseded  in 1960 by the 742 Woodsmaster and then discontinued in 1980. I believe it was resurrected in 1984 as the 7400 and discontinued again in 2006. However, I believe the 7600 which is the pump model is still currently in production.  Remington 760 Gamemaster: Creating vacancy at the Lorraine Motel since April 4, 1968. I would buy a 742 Woodsmaster. I know several folks who own them.  There is a big difference between being a firearms owner and a firearms enthusiast. Anyone can be a firearms owner when someone bequeaths them a rifle. I know men who can't change the oil in their vehicle much less properly maintain a firearm.  "Some people go through life wondering if they've made a difference, Marines don't have that problem."  Ronald Reagan.

Now there's a first post...
(you do owe us a joke though)
post #75 of 81
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lance Colonel View Post

One of the most common problems with the 742 and 7400 was headspace.  Once it's off it will jam and bend extractors and cause all sorts of problems.  I've seen plenty that have went to gunsmiths for a quick fix and then start having problems again just a  few rounds after leaving the shop because the gunsmith did not bother to check the headspace. The 760 Gamemaster is the pump version and allows you to chamber and eject rounds without the force and speed of an auto thus making the cycle of action a lot easier on the receiver components. The 760 Gamemaster was produced first in 1952 and then 3 years later Remington decided to make an auto version of it in 1955 as the 740 Woodsmaster and it was superseded  in 1960 by the 742 Woodsmaster and then discontinued in 1980. I believe it was resurrected in 1984 as the 7400 and discontinued again in 2006. However, I believe the 7600 which is the pump model is still currently in production.  Remington 760 Gamemaster: Creating vacancy at the Lorraine Motel since April 4, 1968. I would buy a 742 Woodsmaster. I know several folks who own them.  There is a big difference between being a firearms owner and a firearms enthusiast. Anyone can be a firearms owner when someone bequeaths them a rifle. I know men who can't change the oil in their vehicle much less properly maintain a firearm.  "Some people go through life wondering if they've made a difference, Marines don't have that problem."  Ronald Reagan.

Quality post icon14.gif welcome aboard. Very interesting moniker. smile.gif
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