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Canoe, kayak or pontoon?

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Ken and I are considering an alternate fishing contraption for back bays and the rivers. We're not certain which direction to go and will be trying these over the next few months. A friend has loaned us a canoe and we know we can rent a kayak. Which do you prefer and why?
post #2 of 15
i like a sit-on-top kayak. i've used it in the back bays and creeks, and i love it. i went with a 12 footer. it's easy to maneuver, easy to get on and off, especially when you're standing in water more than a couple of inches to waist deep or more, and the wind does not seem to push you around as much as the higher canoe.

i would paddle the canoe that you have been loaned, and rent or borrow some kayaks (try as many different kinds as you can), and see what you prefer. nothing sells you on something like your own experience.

i don't have any experience with a pontoon boat, but i see lots of people flounder fishing off of them. i don't think that you would be able to get into all of the same places that you can with a kayak or canoe, so if you're thinking about some small creeks and flats, i would not go with the pontoon boat.

good luck.
post #3 of 15
Ladyfish

A year ago, a similar question was posted on one of the New England flyfishing boards. Here's what I said then (and what I still think):

I fished solo out of a Mad River Duck Hunter--the Explorer hull with an extra thwart. There's no question that it does everthing well, but fishing in salt in the Northeast involves wind. And canoes blow around. And with an open cockpit, they take water. Before you buy, try the canoes on water you intend to fish when it's blowing 10-20. If you're fishing with a friend, one of you will be tending to the boat all the time. If you're fishing solo, you will be in a continuous drift. I still love my canoe for poking around the Charles and local ponds, but in salt water, I now use a hard-chined kayak--lower, lighter, and more manueverable.

And test drive all the things you do with a canoe, not just the paddling. Can you put it on your roof rack solo? Can you swing it up to a portage carry single-handed? There really is a reason that saltwater fishing boards all have a kayak forum and not a canoe forum. Don't mean to sound like a wet blanket here; I think of myself as a canoe guy, not a kayaker, but a lot of combined experience suggests that yaks work better in the salt.
post #4 of 15
Hi Diane

First TonyG makes me feel bad for missin' him at the Fly Fling, now I'm pissed cause I was gonna ask ya'll if ya wanted to try out my pontoon/belly boat,... and then ya post this .....

Hmmmmmmmm....I'm gonna be at Harve De Grace next weekend....
post #5 of 15
Thread Starter 
doyle,

I think that's a different kind of pontoon boat! I'm talking about the Scadden or Outcast type inflatables.

Ben, If I didn't think that yours was more like a belly boat...we'd be interested.

Havre de Grace is close...
post #6 of 15
I'll be in touch
post #7 of 15
I used to have a Achillese rubber raft that I loved. It was slow but you could stand on it. Some animal decided it was also tasty and destroyed it. I have been pondering whether to replace it, get something different, or get a kayak. I looked at the pontoon boats used for big river rafting. You can stand on them but I heard they get blown around in the wind. Recently a buddy showed me his Hobie foot propelled kayak. They look great and allow you to propel yourself while you fish.
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally posted by PeteD:
Recently a buddy showed me his Hobie foot propelled kayak. They look great and allow you to propel yourself while you fish.
Wow! Way cool

Hobie
post #9 of 15
I'd go with the sit on top kayaks... they can really be rigged up nicely for fishing out of...

but you have to get two. the two seaters should come with a disclaimer and a list of good divorce attorneys.
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally posted by TLDig:
I'd go with the sit on top kayaks... they can really be rigged up nicely for fishing out of...

but you have to get two. the two seaters should come with a disclaimer and a list of good divorce attorneys.
I've personally seen more relationships go south on a three hour canoe trip than you would ever believe....
post #11 of 15
When I worked at a canoe livery, we used to have daily pools on which spouse would end up in the front seat after a trip...

Lotsa guys started out in the back.....

Very few ended the trip there.. LOLOL
post #12 of 15
Dianna, I have a variety of backwater crafts you and Ken can try. 2 SOT heritage kayaks (one 14'2" the other 16') a Kiwi Stealth catamaran SOT watercraft (a saltwater 46lb thrust 12v electic powered), and a Mokai (6hp 4stroke Honda powered jet driven). Pick your poison?

I like the Mokai best hands down for backwater fly fishing. Then the Stealth and the SOT kayaks a distant 3rd (one SOT even has inflateable sponsons for extreme stability).

The way I look at fishing is when I am out fishing I want to fish.......if I wanted exercise I would join a gym and enjoy the vastly superior view one gets in a college town's coed gym

Give me stability and it's own power any day over paddling distances just to have to paddle back again. And trust me....fly fishing from a yak or a canoe there are two types of people. Those who have gotten wet and those who are about to get wet. Wet entry is NO fun for people our age and extremely dangerous in some cases.How stealthy is fishing from a kayak while your screaming for help at passing boaters or watching hundreds of dollars of tackle sink to the bottom while your praying that you will not be following your tackles lead in a few more minutes?

Fly fishing should not be a life threatening event unless your spouse is carrying an excessive amount of life insurance ....if so then paddle on
post #13 of 15




post #14 of 15
Ken and Dianne, we have a double SOT to use up at the park and it works OK. We just bought a sit in and now we both can use our own boats. Do not make the mistake we did and just buy 2 to start. I did see a kayak that was a cat. type and you could put a motor on it. I did use an inflatable type of fishing boat that had 2 floats and a seat that you rowed like a dory and the wind made it very hard to control.
Rick
post #15 of 15
Thanks for all the advice and suggestions. Some very good points made that echo some of my own concerns.

JimDE "Give me stability and it's own power any day over paddling distances" That's why we have a boat!

I would like to take you up on your offer to try the Yaks. Will give you a call when we get some time...
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