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no acorns this year


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#1 striper jake

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Posted December 04 2003 - 10:18 PM

last year and many years before , my yard was almost completely cover under each tree in acorns . i gathered buckets and fed the squirrels all winter. this year not a one what gives? any tree experts out there that can splain????

#2 JimD

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Posted December 04 2003 - 10:25 PM

We have a decent amount on my property - I'm not sure but it could be from the amount a rain we've had this year.

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#3 BobNoFish

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Posted December 04 2003 - 11:13 PM

I was wondering the same thing.

#4 Danno

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Posted December 04 2003 - 11:31 PM

I think the ones in central Jersey all blew away.
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#5 Fish Wish

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Posted December 04 2003 - 11:35 PM

I worked in the tree biz for a long time. The acorn crop (referred to as 'Mast') is cyclicle. Some years the trees produce incredible amounts of fruit, some years very little. If memory serves me right, oaks pollenate in February / March in this region (7). I'm not aware of frost being a problem as we have hard freezes well into April here.

There are certain insects that can affect the crop but generally that sort of damage is confined to a select few trees.

I can't remember the number of years in the cycle.
What we think, or what we know, or what we believe, is in the end, of little consequence. The only thing of consequence is what we do. -John Ruskin (1819-1900)

#6 fishcisco

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Posted December 05 2003 - 01:15 AM

bad year for the white oaks, no acorns at all, in fact,judging by the leaves this year both mine and my neighbors look like they might croak . way below average for the red oaks too. my hickorys did themselves proud and the maple trees had a huge seemingly year long seed pod explosion. my treeman tells me its both cyclical and weather related.

#7 TF3

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Posted December 05 2003 - 04:25 AM

The Bass ate em all
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#8 ipspest

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Posted December 05 2003 - 07:04 AM

Where I'm located (Long Island/south shore) the Acorns are raining down like crazy.

Interesting question!

#9 Fish Wish

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Posted December 05 2003 - 08:03 AM

Another point to consider ... this year we had alot of rain. If you'll recall last year it was anything but wet. Public pools weren't being filled due to the drought.

Trees store sugars in their heart wood. The lack of rain in 2002 certainly would contribute to a reduced Mast in 2003.
What we think, or what we know, or what we believe, is in the end, of little consequence. The only thing of consequence is what we do. -John Ruskin (1819-1900)

#10 Boulder

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Posted December 05 2003 - 09:56 AM

Bad year for white oaks, but the red oaks were raining down, same with the black oaks. Swamp oaks were OK, as were the pin oaks.

#11 Robert Williams

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Posted December 05 2003 - 10:28 AM

Talk about the scant mast crop this year has been going on since about August. It's going to be a very tough winter for deer and turkeys, which are plentiful and rely on this critical food source for the necessary carbohyrates to keep them healthy throughout the winter.

It's made deer hunting a bit more unpredictable than in recent years because the deer are often having to spend more time wandering in order to find adequate food but the movements have been more difficult to pattern.

#12 lowpine

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Posted December 05 2003 - 12:39 PM

I'm down in VA, and was pondering the exact same thing the other day while doing the leaves. Not complaining just wondering.
trying it has worked so far..... keep trying!

#13 Fish Wish

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Posted December 05 2003 - 12:47 PM

RW, in years with low mast look for a grove of wild cherry's. Believe it or not, deer and turkey eat the seeds of cherry when the mast is poor.
What we think, or what we know, or what we believe, is in the end, of little consequence. The only thing of consequence is what we do. -John Ruskin (1819-1900)

#14 Charleston

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Posted December 05 2003 - 01:09 PM

Fish Wish;
You nailed it buddy. The mast crop is cyclicle. I watch the white and red oaks on my property every year. This year is light.
Good info!!

What?