NJTramcar

Working a bucktail from a boat

12 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

I have purchased a light weight fluke rod that is rated 1-4 oz.  I took out on a boat and began bucktailing trying to keep the jig moving.

 

After seeing posts and videos of people jigging rapidly, I tried the same and did well but noticed that sometimes, while jigging, I could feel the jig drop as I was raising it.  Sort of out of pace.  I would lift and feel the jig drop and drop the tip and not feel anything.

 

I imagine this means I was jigging to quickly as I wasn’t in contact with the jig.

 

Should I slow it down or is this to be expected from the rapid jigging method?

Edited by NJTramcar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you were maintaining contact with the bottom, I’d probably just slow down. it happens. You could also try smaller hops so the jig doesn’t come up as far off the bottom. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Drop that jig in a fish tank and jig it around.  You'll get a very good look at what's going on down there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use to have the same problem,i was lifting the jig too high of the bottom , really short fast taps of the tip, with moderate speed should do it. I use fast rods to do it as well , your rod might be too moderate/soft?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

17 hours ago, NJTramcar said:

I have purchased a light weight fluke rod that is rated 1-4 oz.  I took out on a boat and began bucktailing trying to keep the jig moving.

 

After seeing posts and videos of people jigging rapidly, I tried the same and did well but noticed that sometimes, while jigging, I could feel the jig drop as I was raising it.  Sort of out of pace.  I would lift and feel the jig drop and drop the tip and not feel anything.

 

I imagine this means I was jigging to quickly as I wasn’t in contact with the jig.

 

Should I slow it down or is this to be expected from the rapid jigging method?

When you are jigging along and you got your rhythm down, then something is (sorta out of place), SWING...:)

You lift and drop the tip and do not feel anything, SWING a fish got it...;)

Hope this helps, and if it works, don't fix-it

Lou

Edited by Lou T

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 mins ago, Lou T said:

When you are gigging along and you got your rhythm down, then something is (sorta out of place), SWING...:)

You lift and drop the tip and do not feel anything, SWING a fish got it...;)

Hope this helps, and if it works, don't fix-it

Lou

Oh yea. My favorite kind of hit is when I don’t feel anything at all, the fish just slacks me up. Reel down and let em have it!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no right or wrong answer here. Some days the fish will want the jig fast, some slow, and some lying on the ocean floor. Your best bet is to test it out and see what works best for you. A few days ago I was not getting anything from the vertical rapid jigging and decided to really slow it down and crawl it on the bottom with the occasional twitch and it did the trick. Trial and error will go a long way and report your results back here to share with all of us. When you pull in your doormat from jigging your own style it'll feel great! Best of luck and tight lines:th:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can't even remember how long I have fished bucktails and always in the back bays. Like others have stated, there are many ways to work the tail. Always found my best results from mixing it up constantly. I run the motor the entire time I fish so my tails are just about always vertical. If you are just drifting with your line out at a big angle then jigging action isn't as effective because with lifting the rod you just pull the tail across the bottom faster. More straight up and down means the tail is jumping every time you lift your rod. 

Always remember that a bucktail no matter how much you paid for it is just a weighted hook with some hair and is there to attract attention. It will attract more attention by moving erratically than it will if you keep the same constant jigging action. I guess that I have fished with tails for so long that I just kind of go into auto mode when drifting for summer flounder. Hit the bottom then I lift about three feet and let it hit the bottom again. Then some light twitch lifts about six inches then hit the bottom and sit for about three seconds then lift three feet again. Flounder are so good at hunting that they will just slide up and check out your tail even nudge it before it decides weather it will strike or not. The same constant motion seems to lull the flounder almost as if it is bored. You lift and drop the same and say the tail moves three feet forward with each lift. The flounder will move that three feet to keep track of the tail but then seems to get bored and will often just move off. By constantly changing your jigging action the flounder never knows how far the tail will move and keeps the flounder on edge and the fastest way to get one to strike is to piss it off.  

One problem I've always had to deal with is the hole in the bait like a live minnow or strip bait and the hole the hook makes from the constant jigging action. Often it wears the hole where the hook penetrates so it is loose on the hook. Then when a flounder strikes it will sometime just knock the minnow or strip bait right off. Took a few years but came up with an idea that solved the problem. I just take a plastic worm and cut it into small pieces.

DSCF5351.JPG.65a53c197035915038720350b90f1e7b.JPG

 

Then after I place the minnow or strip bait on I simply slip on a piece of the worm right over the bait. Then no matter how hard you jig or how big of a hole you wear into the bait it can't come off because the piece of worm won't allow it to. 

DSCF5349.JPG.eba01f15d745a618775545b3da077336.JPG

 

The only wrong way to fish a jig or tail is to have it do nothing. While all the weeds, straw grass and other junk is just rolling across the bottom with the tide you want the tail to be jumping up and down so it is totally different from all other movement. This is what will catch the flounders all seeing eyes. Get their attention and most of the battle is won. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.