scoobydoo

2019 Penn Spinfisher VI 1 Hour submersion test & results......because....why not

44 posts in this topic

1 hour ago, Streamdance said:

Hello,

 

my objection is not because of max drag or tuna / shark fishing.

It's because of a long tradition.

The Penn Spinfisher is now a plastic reel like most others are.

 

Thanks for that!

 

In my opinion, weight reduction is not the reason for that. It's only because of profit maximization.

You're entitled to your views.   But in my eyes....calling it a Plastic reel is 100% wrong.

Aluminum frame, sideplate.  Aluminum and brass gears.

Plastic rotor.  Which is again.  Lighter where it would benefit most....On the output side of the mechanism.

 

 

And metal rotors in the larger sizes 

 

Didn't penn offer the Spinfisher SSG?   20 years ago?

 

You're free to keep buyin what your buying...and who knows...maybe the Spinfisher will end up being a piece of junk.....But the plastic rotor on reels under 5500 sizes isn't going to be the cause of it.

 

If you were to have issue with the price being the same and the drag being dumbed down......I can see that.  But with all the improvements made....to focus on something that I look at as a benefit.  Is just silly.

 

(and after listing a ton of great reels with plastic rotors and the stance you maintain.....it's just you wanting to find fault with something where it doesn't exist)

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8 hours ago, scoobydoo said:

Hey Scoob, I just did the rotor squeeze test on Stradic fj,Spheros,Daiwa bg,Spinfisher v,Daiwa Tatula and a crappy Quantum Smoke.

The crappy Quantum Smoke won the rigidity test imho.

 

“Metal where it matters.....a silly marketing slogan on a crappy overpriced Quantum reel....”

 

 

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On 8/10/2018 at 9:06 PM, olvart said:

 

And by doing so did all the reels shatter into tiny little pieces?

 

:)

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4 hours ago, scoobydoo said:

And by doing so did all the reels shatter into tiny little pieces?

 

:)

No,they all survived,no reels were harmed.

:)

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there is a place for both metal and plastic parts and it depends on many things

which make one or another better choice

and by no means metal always makes better choice, especialy if internals cant keep up..

aand, if one uses braid, plastic rotor saves the day, at the end

Edited by glos

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10 hours ago, GooganFish said:

A wrench for the nut...... I'm really surprised you don't have a go through ratchet set..............

I do but not all sizes.  but I stopped using them.  I found that sockets scratch anodizing.

and I don't like taping their bases over and over again.

additionally some reel ya gotta turn it perfectly.  And I prefer small wrenches for that as I'm less likely to round off.

 

To each their own.   And I'm in and out of quite a few reels.

 

Oh....and I lose sockets like chapstick :)

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On 8/10/2018 at 2:32 PM, Streamdance said:

Hello,

 

my objection is not because of max drag or tuna / shark fishing.

It's because of a long tradition.

The Penn Spinfisher is now a plastic reel like most others are.

 

Thanks for that!

 

In my opinion, weight reduction is not the reason for that. It's only because of profit maximization.

Would you continue using aluminum arrows for archery just because they are metal?  :kook:

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Fact of the matter a graphite rotor turns over easier (lighter). If it meets strength and durability requirements for the rated drag there's nothing wrong with it.

 

Metal body and side plate are far, far more significant for the toughness of the reel (and gears) in the long run, imo.

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2 hours ago, cweed said:

olvart

Why is the Smoke reel crappy?

‘cause scoob said it was, :), I was quoting him.

 I like them for my application.

Wading,kayaking...

scoob is always talking about street price and I usually pay $100 or less for these reels.

 I have dunked,dropped etc and if it is serious I pull the 2 screws at the back bumper and drain. That opens the gear train ,unlike any other reel I know,and good to go.

Light,stiff,great drags.

There are things I don’t like about them but they work for my application.

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 if i recall correctly keith in the reel maint forum (handi) speaks well of them

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On 14.8.2018. at 1:02 AM, johndtuttle said:

Fact of the matter a graphite rotor turns over easier (lighter). If it meets strength and durability requirements for the rated drag there's nothing wrong with it.

 

Metal body and side plate are far, far more significant for the toughness of the reel (and gears) in the long run, imo.

and more importantly they cussion the strain with flexing, especialy while fish or heavy loads are pulled

so the braid cant cut into itself so easily as with metal rotors

 

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1 min ago, glos said:

and more importantly they cussion the strain with flexing, especialy while fish or heavy loads are pulled

so the braid cant cut into itself so easily as with metal rotors

 

 

I've gone both ways on this issue.

 

Metal might be tougher (fall in rocks etc). But if designed right a graphite rotor is the least of my concerns as compared to the drive train and support.

 

And who doesn't like a smexy Zaion rotor? 

 

Besides, falling in the rocks is against the rules with a Saltiga. :)

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