stormy monday

Advice for a spinning rookie?

16 posts in this topic

Here are some basic, stupid even, questions regarding spinning gear. Background, been fly fishing since the 60s because someone gave me one, so I have no knowledge of most gear. I have used a bait casting rig for LMBs once but that’s it other than droplines for flounder. My son would like to fish with me, but the fly gear is more effort than he is into right now, kid works 11 hour days, so I got him a 7’ rod and a spinning reel with 14 lb. mono on it to go chase some schoolies with me. That said;

How does the drag function on a spinning reel (told you it was basic)? On the fly reel, which is direct drag, the fish runs when I let it, but when I reel in it can no longer take line – same with a spinning reel? I found a nice diamond jig in RI last week, is that alone OK or should I get like a Hoagy soft sand eel to put on it? Or would I be better off with plugs or something to that effect. We’re both too ADD for bait fishing… He’ll probably only go out with me a few times before he heads back to school, so not into huge investments, and sometimes he does use fly gear (he’s actually a good caster) he’s just feeling burnt out right now. Thanks for any info you can offer! Oh, I’m thinking mostly beaches and estuaries if that matters. Funny most people think fly fishing is complex, but to me spinning gear seems complex…

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 I found this expansion online on how the drag works on a spinning reel. 

 

The drag is simply a pair of friction plates inside of fishing reels. If the fish pulls on the line hard enough, the friction is overcome, and the reelrotates backwards, letting line out.  

 

 

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14 mins ago, stormy monday said:

Here are some basic, stupid even, questions regarding spinning gear. Background, been fly fishing since the 60s because someone gave me one, so I have no knowledge of most gear. I have used a bait casting rig for LMBs once but that’s it other than droplines for flounder. My son would like to fish with me, but the fly gear is more effort than he is into right now, kid works 11 hour days, so I got him a 7’ rod and a spinning reel with 14 lb. mono on it to go chase some schoolies with me. That said;

How does the drag function on a spinning reel (told you it was basic)? On the fly reel, which is direct drag, the fish runs when I let it, but when I reel in it can no longer take line – same with a spinning reel? I found a nice diamond jig in RI last week, is that alone OK or should I get like a Hoagy soft sand eel to put on it? Or would I be better off with plugs or something to that effect. We’re both too ADD for bait fishing… He’ll probably only go out with me a few times before he heads back to school, so not into huge investments, and sometimes he does use fly gear (he’s actually a good caster) he’s just feeling burnt out right now. Thanks for any info you can offer! Oh, I’m thinking mostly beaches and estuaries if that matters. Funny most people think fly fishing is complex, but to me spinning gear seems complex…

The adjustable drag on a spinning reel is independent of crank gears. Front drag reels have the drag in the spool. The drag washers apply pressure by turning the drag knob. With a loose drag the spool spins around the drag system which is mounted on the spindle via washers. turn the drag knob and it takes more pressure to force the spool to turn around the drag washers.

 

Given the way spinning reel drags work, you could turn the crank handle and never retrieve any line if the force applied by the fish is more than than drag setting can sustain. The spool will spin and you will get line twist. When a fish is taking drag you can either wait for the fish to tire or tighten the drag to a setting equal or above the force the fish is putting on the line. Of course setting the drag too high will cause break offs. The rule of thumb is a drag setting in pounds equal to 1/3 the breaking strength of the line. In your case about 5 lbs for 14 lb line. With experience and awareness of line strength and drag adjustments for a given reel, the drag could be adjusted with a fish on. This should be avoided by inexperienced anglers.

 

Soft plastics on jig heads are a great start. Avoid treble hooks as they could be more trouble than they are worth when it comes to inexperienced anglers.

 

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5 mins ago, GuiltyAsCharged said:

The adjustable drag on a spinning reel is independent of crank gears. Front drag reels have the drag in the spool. The drag washers apply pressure by turning the drag knob. With a loose drag the spool spins around the drag system which is mounted on the spindle via washers. turn the drag knob and it takes more pressure to force the spool to turn around the drag washers.

 

Given the way spinning reel drags work, you could turn the crank handle and never retrieve any line if the force applied by the fish is more than than drag setting can sustain. The spool will spin and you will get line twist. When a fish is taking drag you can either wait for the fish to tire or tighten the drag to a setting equal or above the force the fish is putting on the line. Of course setting the drag too high will cause break offs. The rule of thumb is a drag setting in pounds equal to 1/3 the breaking strength of the line. In your case about 5 lbs for 14 lb line. With experience and awareness of line strength and drag adjustments for a given reel, the drag could be adjusted with a fish on. This should be avoided by inexperienced anglers.

 

Soft plastics on jig heads are a great start. Avoid treble hooks as they could be more trouble than they are worth when it comes to inexperienced anglers.

 

Pretty much sums it up.  One thing I would change is that 14lb mono, get some 20lb braid, casting and sensitivity will be greatly improved, especially with jigs.

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Posted (edited)

Stormy

 

When it comes to lures fished from a beach or the bank of an estuary you can't get any simpler than buck-tail jigs,  jig heads with soft plastic or,  jig heads with gulp salt water products.

 

There is a 17/ 18 year old kid fishing with his father on the beach that I've been frequenting who is out fishing the bait chuckers and fly fishers by leaps and bounds, The only thing he uses is a spinning reel / rod  combo and a lead head jig with a silver colored soft plastic swim bait. He has used that same jig configuration since mid June and won't give it up because he is catching fish when no one else is.

 

Edited by Crozzbow

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I've read a lot of your posts, and I really mean no offense but how have you made it fishing 30+ years without ever encountering a spinning reel? Impressive!

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Your desire to learn is a GREAT thing for you and for our fisheries. Younger generations are watching and need role models in a world where some teach them it’s okay to disrespect their loved ones !!!

 

Try to remember to RELAX. If you have tension it’s fish catching prevention !!!

 

Also remember one difference between fly and spin is that with flies you are almost always rewarded for finesse. With spin you can do more to SPUR a hit that may not have happened without an attention grabbing catalyst. Try some retrieve with a jerk jerk jerk and don’t be afraid to pause. That’s when most strikes come and if you keep CONNECTION with the lure during the pause you will be ready CONNECT !!!

 

Welcome aboard. You will meet many great people on this forum !!!

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4 hours ago, LobsterGuy said:

I've read a lot of your posts, and I really mean no offense but how have you made it fishing 30+ years without ever encountering a spinning reel? Impressive!

LOL ya I know. So I started like all kids in my neighborhood fishing a dropline off the local pier, then out of a pram for flounder. I loved fishing, spent every second doing it and a family friend had this fly rod and auto reel that he had no idea what it was so he gave it to me. It was free so that's what I used, at the time it wasn't ocean gear but I didn't know that. I made flies out of snelled hooks, barbie dolls and airplane glue, didn't catch much but damn I just loved going. I never got around to trying other things, partly a financial decision at first but then I had no need, When I bought my camp in Maine the guy left a bait casting rig there so I did learn how to cast that, not well but hey. I got my kid a spincast kids thing years ago, push the button and let it fly, but all that did was tangle on us mostly lol. I taught my son to fly cast, but he thinks there's too much busy work involved. I look at this as an opportunity for me to maybe learn something new too!

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Thanks guys, I can't wait to get him out there with this gear. I'm hoping he outfishes me, which given the past couple weeks is pretty likely haha! He got me a gift certificate at a local bait (and beer) shop for father's day, instead of beer I'm going to use it to get him some of those soft baits and jigs. Well I might get beer too, he's of age...

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6 hours ago, nateD said:

Pretty much sums it up.  One thing I would change is that 14lb mono, get some 20lb braid, casting and sensitivity will be greatly improved, especially with jigs.

Cool, I have some braid that I used for backing once. Question - I also have this bait casting reel that seems like it would be fun for schoolies too - can I use braid on that as well? Doesn't seem to have a lot of line capacity, but I'm kind of into trying new stuff. Must be a second midlife crisis coming!

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1 hour ago, stormy monday said:

Cool, I have some braid that I used for backing once. Question - I also have this bait casting reel that seems like it would be fun for schoolies too - can I use braid on that as well? Doesn't seem to have a lot of line capacity, but I'm kind of into trying new stuff. Must be a second midlife crisis coming!

Ya for sure, I used to use freshwater baitcast all the time for schoolies. If you have only casted it with mono then braid takes a bit of getting used to but it isn't bad. With 20 or even 30lb braid I don't think you will have a problem with capacity, unless you hook a cow on accident.

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12 mins ago, nateD said:

Ya for sure, I used to use freshwater baitcast all the time for schoolies. If you have only casted it with mono then braid takes a bit of getting used to but it isn't bad. With 20 or even 30lb braid I don't think you will have a problem with capacity, unless you hook a cow on accident.

I can't even get a cow on purpose!!

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One important thing to remember with spinning reels is to STOP REELING when you hear that drag clicking. Think of it as a warning to stop reeling and let the fish run.

You can put your index finger on the spool and apply a little bit of pressure on the spool to increase drag and slow the fish down, but never reel against the drag.

If you do, not only will you have NO effect on the fish, but you'll twist your line up so bad that it'll never cast well again.

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if you go braid pay attention for windknots. I fill my spool 80-85% of the way and it greatly reduces wind knots as well as flipping the bail by hand

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