Tin Boat

Switch rod doubts

70 posts in this topic

Killie

Its an interesting one putting up a Light TH against say a decent single hand 10 wt. I would probably agree with you that a TH rod and call it what we will then it will probably need to be capable of casting at least 410 grains with some authority if it is to compare well. It’s only personal but I would prefer the single hand rod.

My own 12 foot light as in 7 or 8 wt TH is just magical in any wind other than a head wind or tail wind and that’s with 530 grains. It’s plain embarrassing in the wrong winds. This rod is now relegated to,the loft. We don’t just get winds Out Front.

 

As to how rods are referenced. I think it can be both useful but at times misleading. Not all switch rods are 10 feet six inches long.

 

Taking these short ones out of the discussion then calling them a short TH Spey rod is a better description.  But that is not going to happen. The name Switch is with us now.If the rod is designed for the salt then calling them a Beach rod is useful as it is giving us the clue that the rod is perhaps stiffer and better suited to over head casting. To me I don’t care if a blank is designed as a Carp or spin and then turned into a fly rod. I would tend to label these as Beach rods. Key is that the rod is marked with its grain range capability for both Spey and OH if that is relevant to the rods design.

 

The problems start when guys take them out of the rods comfort zone. They get disappointed and it is not the fault of the rod.

 

Mike

Edited by Mike Oliver

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On 7/10/2018 at 6:46 PM, Mike Oliver said:

Red I did. The 14 footer you cast was the 12-13. Dougie tried it with 750 and it flew. It surprised me. I had it down as 650. Mind Dougie has a slower delivery.

 

The 12’ 9”  you also threw was the 11-12.

 

There are two of what you desire in the near offing.

 

Mike

What do you mean slow ??? 

Guess I need to work on my umph when I cast :)

 

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Heh Dougie you going all prickly on me now. Big men big rods perfect match.

Bit more effort and you could have broken a window. I am now keen to give this rod some more time.

 

But thinking about it. Yes you do.:laugh:

 

mikey

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On 7/16/2018 at 1:56 PM, Killiefish said:

Mike, no offense taken.  My only concern is that people who don't fish in the conditions you do often enough may not need to get a rod specifically made for those conditions and IMO can do pretty well using an 11- 12' TH rod that can handle the equivalent of an ~11w or higher single hand line.  My basic standard is an 11w tarpon line (overweight really for an 11w rating at 410g - 38' head, as measured); it is also the same line  the OP, TinBoat tried when his rod felt overloaded.  Most 7/8 or 8wt switch rods I have owned or tested can handle that line as an OH line unless they are not rated for spey but rated for single hand.

For guys that live near the water, it probably isn't a big deal to have a rod that can't handle "out front" conditions.

 

But for someone like me who is driving a minimum of six hours (or flying) to get to the salt -- and therefore having to plan trips in advance of accurate weather forecasts -- not having a rod which can handle a fairly significant amount of wind or waves means having wasted a trip to the beach. And I don't like spin fishing.

 

What I've found w/ some switch rods (like the current Redington rod I have) is even if it can handle casting into some wind, it won't pick a sinking head up very efficiently, causing me to spend way more of my time than I want to roll casting to get the  line out of the water.

 

I'd personally rather have a two-handed rod that is great at the beach and sucks a little to spey cast with, than vice-versa.

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3 hours ago, PATroutGuy said:

For guys that live near the water, it probably isn't a big deal to have a rod that can't handle "out front" conditions.

 

But for someone like me who is driving a minimum of six hours (or flying) to get to the salt -- and therefore having to plan trips in advance of accurate weather forecasts -- not having a rod which can handle a fairly significant amount of wind or waves means having wasted a trip to the beach. And I don't like spin fishing.

 

What I've found w/ some switch rods (like the current Redington rod I have) is even if it can handle casting into some wind, it won't pick a sinking head up very efficiently, causing me to spend way more of my time than I want to roll casting to get the  line out of the water.

 

I'd personally rather have a two-handed rod that is great at the beach and sucks a little to spey cast with, than vice-versa

 

Edited by Mike Oliver

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PATroutGuy.

 

Thanks you have put into words what I have wanted to say but could not find them myself.

 

Just about the worst thing that can happen to you is to turn up with a TH rod and find you are under rodded.

 

None of my own  Rods can Spey cast for toffee.. If they could they would be binned as it would mean they are unsuitable period.

 

Wind can make life tough not just Out Front  but  on the insides to. Pleasant Bay is a prime example as is Cape Cod Bay.

 

Mike

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On 18/07/2018 at 1:29 PM, PATroutGuy said:

For guys that live near the water, it probably isn't a big deal to have a rod that can't handle "out front" conditions.

 

But for someone like me who is driving a minimum of six hours (or flying) to get to the salt -- and therefore having to plan trips in advance of accurate weather forecasts -- not having a rod which can handle a fairly significant amount of wind or waves means having wasted a trip to the beach. And I don't like spin fishing.

 

What I've found w/ some switch rods (like the current Redington rod I have) is even if it can handle casting into some wind, it won't pick a sinking head up very efficiently, causing me to spend way more of my time than I want to roll casting to get the  line out of the water.

 

I'd personally rather have a two-handed rod that is great at the beach and sucks a little to spey cast with, than vice-versa.

Good point about the driving distance... I'm lucky enough to to live within 10 min of the beach and wind is not an issue because I always fish from dawn until noon unless we get a glassy day. 

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I have a heck of a ride too, 3 to 4 hrs depending where, so I just bring to whole arsenal.  This winter will be building the out front weapon, for now, I just sit and watch on those windy, surfy kinda days.

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