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Sudsy

Need some help from the fairy wand crew......

13 posts in this topic

7 hours ago, Sudsy said:

Any idea ??

 

 

I have a couple like that in the UK from my grandfather - split cane was used for all types of rods - fly, pinning, trotting etc back in the day. the milled butt is not unusual for the era - 1900's to 1940's. Portuguese Cork was expensive then I

 

its prolly for salmon or pike/walleye.

 

its impossible to figure out the make without a mark. there might be still some mark somewhere - clean the ferrules ;)

 

I keep mine on the wall mounted.

 

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Not a fly rod

 

 

Aside from the lack of teeth marks in the handle, it's on the wrong side of the seat.

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If not a fly rod, what kind of a rod do you think it is ?

I've seen somewhat similar looking centerpin rods but that's about it

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6 hours ago, Aquacide said:

I have a couple like that in the UK from my grandfather - split cane was used for all types of rods - fly, pinning, trotting etc back in the day. the milled butt is not unusual for the era - 1900's to 1940's. Portuguese Cork was expensive then I

 

its prolly for salmon or pike/walleye.

 

its impossible to figure out the make without a mark. there might be still some mark somewhere - clean the ferrules ;)

 

I keep mine on the wall mounted.

 

I'd like to fix it up and fish it a few times, then it'll get hung up

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Posted (edited)

Looking at it a bit closer here's what makes me think it's not a fly rod

The opening in the tip is barely a 16'th of an inch - Most of my fly lines are thicker than this

 

20180612_164207_resized.thumb.jpg.39a5a06f02988712b194829a86fa41d4.jpg

Edited by Sudsy

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Hi

I'd agree it was a rod for trotting. This is where you would use a centre pin reel and trot a bait under a float down a run to a fish , often used for chub or grayling. Jim

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3 hours ago, Highlandsaltyfly said:

Hi

I'd agree it was a rod for trotting. This is where you would use a centre pin reel and trot a bait under a float down a run to a fish , often used for chub or grayling. Jim

yes. it looks like my Grandads trotting rod. he used it to trott for Barbel & chub on the Avon at Christchurch.

 

possibly the OP's relative trotted for Salmon up on Lake Ontario or Maine etc - over here they call it 'center-pinning (sic)' and they trott a small bag of fish eggs along the bottom.

 

my other rods from the old 'un are by Richard Walker, who I'm sure you know ;) 

 

but sadly they are worth only the sentiment.

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Upon discovering it's not even a fly rod I cut a deal with the guy and swapped it for a different rod, an actual fly rod, I'm thinking it's a 6 or 7 weight.

Again, no name, nothing spectacular, but a fun toy to play with after it's re varnished and some of the wraps are redone.

 

It does have a bit of an "S" curve in it, but that's a different thread

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11 hours ago, ken r said:

So you long to become a fairy?

 

Ken,

 

He has always been a fairy!  When I took him clamming he showed up with a rake that had a blood worm net attached to It.  Sheezh!  He has his foibles, but he is house broken and is a good lunch companion.

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So it seems in the end the end we now have two mysteries resolved, he now has a fly rod after the trade and that because of that trade has now joined the ranks of us fairy fly fishers if he wasn't already.

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