SIC34

Derailing the reports thread. Proper fish handling/ CNR

57 posts in this topic

It's getting a little difficult to chase reports with all of the critiquing going on in the reports thread.  Thought it might be good to start a new thread to get some pointers from the "sharpies".

 

What we have learned:

 

BAD:

- Stepping or kneeling hard on a fish while removing hooks.

- Grabbing a fish under the gill plate

- Kicking or throwing fish back in the water.

- Dragging fish on dry land and removing the slime, prior to release

 

GOOD:

-Lippers and de-hookers while keeping a fish in the water, if possible.

-Removing barbs from hooks for quicker release with less damage.

-Not fishing, no chance of hurting a fish

-Keeping a legal fish, no chance of lowering the catch and release mortality rate.

 

FROWNED UPON OR NOT?:

- Removing a fish from the water, removing the hook, fumbling through your pockets until you find your phone and dry off your hands, letting it bake on the hot sand in the sun so you can take a photo before releasing it?  Of course you need to put your phone away before you take it to the water to revive it.

 

Thoughts, recommendations or comments?

 

 

 

 

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I'm going to add one more to the:

 

FROWNED UPON OR NOT:

 

-Tagging fish?  I've seen some bass with tremendous gaping wounds in the back where the tag is placed.

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Thank you for posting. Only my second season using artificials, but I have set up my belt to easily access my gripper and pliers. Crush my barbs for my safety as well as the fish. The phone and picture thing i haven't figured out yet so I just don't take pictures atm. I don't keep fish unless I feel it's going to die. 

I do remember days when I was a kid. People catching blues and cracking them in the skull to get a hook out. My old man wasn't having that go on with his kids. Mistreating fish is learned behavior, just like proper safe handling. Try and be cool and educate. 

Tight lines gentleman

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Guys, this is simple stuff that even wikihow can help you with.  

 

How to Catch and Release Blue Fish

If you've ever seen a bluefish feeding frenzy, the churning water and leaping silver should tell you how strong and aggressive these predators can be. Catch and release safety has two meanings when it comes to these fish. Handle the fish carefully to minimize harm to the fish, and to keep your own hands safe from its powerful bite.

 
 

Steps

  1. Image titled Catch and Release Blue Fish Step 1
    1
    Attach a steel leader to your line. Bluefish teeth can sever nylon fishing line. Attach a steel wire leader to the end of the line to protect it.
     
  2. Image titled Catch and Release Blue Fish Step 2
    2
    Wear gloves. Work gloves protect your hands from bluefish teeth and make it easier to handle the wire leader and fishing line without cutting yourself. Kevlar or other cut-resistant material is best, but any gloves are better than nothing.[1]
     
  3. Image titled Catch and Release Blue Fish Step 3
    3
    Choose your lure or bait. Bluefish are aggressive feeders willing to charge at just about any splashing surface lure. Big, teardrop-shaped lures work well in choppy water, but they must be reeled back immediately to keep them on the surface. Rely on pencil poppers instead in calm water, working them slowly across the surface.[2] You can use squid, mullet, mackerel, or other saltwater fish as bait instead, especially if you do not see bluefish breaking the surface.[3]
    • When practicing catch and release, use only one hook at a time. Multiple hooks or multi-pronged hooks can be very difficult to extract without injuring the fish.
    • Bluefish are messy eaters that can rip apart the bait while missing the hook. Pierce the hook through the length of the bait, not just the head or tip.[4]
     
  4. Image titled Catch and Release Blue Fish Step 4
    4
    Handle the fish quickly and carefully. Fighting the hook can cause extreme exhaustion, and even a short time out of the water raises the fish's mortality rate. Bring the bluefish next to the boat as fast as possible. If you can, leave it in the water while you remove the hook. If you must lift it out of the water, wet your gloves, then lift the fish out with both hands supporting the head and base of the tail. If you want a photograph, have someone take one while you're removing the hook — the fish may not be able to afford extra posing time.
    • Never touch the gills of a fish during catch-and-release.
    • Dry hands or knotted nets rub off a layer of protective slime, leaving the fish vulnerable to infection.[5]
     
  5. Image titled Catch and Release Blue Fish Step 5
    5
    Remove the hook with pliers or special tools. To avoid bites, always use long-handled hemostats, needle-nose pliers, or de-hooking tools instead, withdrawing the hook gently but quickly. The fish is much more likely to die if you rip out the hook, or if you take too long handling it out of the water.
    • If the hook is caught deep inside the fish, removing it is likely to injure internal organs. Just cut the line as close to the hook as possible, and leave it embedded in the fish. The mortality rate is still very high in these cases. Avoid feeding line to the fish after it bites, which can lead to this situation.[6]
    • Circle hooks are easy to remove and less likely to snag deep in the fish.[7]
     
  6. Image titled Catch and Release Blue Fish Step 6
    6
    Hold the fish underwater until it revives. If you lifted the fish out of the water, lower it back down gently; never throw it. Hold the fish underwater for about thirty seconds until it is ready to swim on its own.
    • If the fish's gills are barely moving, gently push the fish back and forth in the water so water flows over the gills. Release the fish once the gills are pumping vigorously.[8]

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Posted (edited)

Same principal as the lip gripper but one less thing to spend time removing from your surf belt.  Remember, every second counts.  Save the gripper for fish with more fragile mouths like stripped bass.  

Edited by ChumSlickJon

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3 mins ago, ChumSlickJon said:

Same principal as the lip gripper but one less thing to spend time removing from your surf belt.  Remember, every second counts.  Save the gripper for fish with more fragile mouths like stripped bass.  

 

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9 mins ago, MitchellNJ said:

I highly recommend step 5. They go completely docile when you lip them. 

 

 

:laugh: 

 

I fear some folks may actually do this, and am positive they will actually lose a finger. Oh well, survival of the fittest.

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7 mins ago, pricise10 said:

 

yes P10.  The magical stripped bass.  You don't want your finger in there.  You could lose it.  

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16 mins ago, MitchellNJ said:

I highly recommend step 5. They go completely docile when you lip them.

 

 

 

I hardly ever pick up fish with hooks.  They flop and slip out of your hands and then you get caught.  I've never been hooked and the only time i came close was when i picked up a fish with a plug in its maw.  Never again.  Don't worry about sand on them...the ocean is a washing machine it'll come off.  I've seen more damage done due to ALS tags than anything else.

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I believe the fish that come out of the raritan have multiple layers of slime, the natural one and then the 5 or 6 layers of slime from industrial runoff, they may actually be relieved to come up onto to dry land to scrape some layers off  :shrug:

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A member posted a photo of him holding a bluefish down with his foot...I don't see a problem with that.  He didn't kick it & it didn't look like he was crushing it.  Are we really that sensitive that we're worried some snowflake will make a big deal about it??

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6 mins ago, frogman00 said:

A member posted a photo of him holding a bluefish down with his foot...I don't see a problem with that.  He didn't kick it & it didn't look like he was crushing it.  Are we really that sensitive that we're worried some snowflake will make a big deal about it??

Post reported

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3 hours ago, SIC34 said:

It's getting a little difficult to chase reports with all of the critiquing going on in the reports thread.  Thought it might be good to start a new thread to get some pointers from the "sharpies".

 

What we have learned:

 

BAD:

- Stepping or kneeling hard on a fish while removing hooks.

- Grabbing a fish under the gill plate

- Kicking or throwing fish back in the water.

- Dragging fish on dry land and removing the slime, prior to release

 

GOOD:

-Lippers and de-hookers while keeping a fish in the water, if possible.

-Removing barbs from hooks for quicker release with less damage.

-Not fishing, no chance of hurting a fish

-Keeping a legal fish, no chance of lowering the catch and release mortality rate.

 

FROWNED UPON OR NOT?:

- Removing a fish from the water, removing the hook, fumbling through your pockets until you find your phone and dry off your hands, letting it bake on the hot sand in the sun so you can take a photo before releasing it?  Of course you need to put your phone away before you take it to the water to revive it.

 

Thoughts, recommendations or comments?

 

 

 

 

Easy to “chase” these reports... schoolie heaven out front 

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