Mainiac

Salt ponds question.

59 posts in this topic

3 hours ago, isleomaniac said:

Turns out my math was off on the percentage, more like 4 percent than 3.

 

IMG_0518.jpg

I wasn't going to mention it...great pic

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a little info,,,,, Grasshopper

Dont fish the hatch,,,,,,

Fish prior to the hatch. 

Fish the drop, after the last hatch,,,,,

Now the question is where??????

Some on here will get it

BTF 

out

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Found my first early hatch yesterday evening (Thursday, May 3).  Last years first took place on 4/30/17, but not necessarily running late this year, as the tides change from year to year.  They both took place at the same tide, and time, a 5 pm high in a shallow muddy backwater bay that heats up quicker than most other locations.  Both started at high outgoing tide at 5:30.  Both also started after the necessary 2-1/2 days of sun.  The only difference was last year had plenty of fish, and this year had none present.  The last time this no fish event happened was 2014, when we had a polar vortex winter, and that year the fish did not arrive until mid-May.  For more insight, tips and tactics, see: "Fly fishing The Worm Hatch", available at Amazon, or locally at Bears Den. 

DSCF6195.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've fished the worm hatch a handful of times over the years.  I personally enjoy it but understand why some don't.   I mostly fly fish, but also break out small sluggos which have worked for me in the past.  White and pink.  As for flies, I thought I had the perfect fly a few seasons ago as I did fairly well with it.   As someone mentioned earlier, I used a dropper to provide more offerings.  On a floating line though.  But for whatever reason that fly hasn't given me a lot of luck lately.  One thing I suggest is watch the worms swim for a while.  The speed, the motion, and so on.  Make sure your offering does the same.   It can be very frustrating, but the whole experience is special.  I have yet to catch a big striper during worm hatch, but just catching one is an accomplishment so size isn't a big issue.   I live in MA so it is a lot of work and a big production to try and catch the hatch at the right time, but I go at least once a spring. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One other thought.  I have had success on occasion nymphing worms.  I found a small "stream" drained into a larger "stream" in a salt pond.   It was really just cuts or channels but acted the same as a fresh water stream.   The worms were drifting out of the smaller channel into the larger channel and the bass were ambushing them like trout.  I stood on the bank and caught about 10 bass in an hour with my worm flies drifting with the current about a foot under the water.  All very small bass but still rewarding.  I've tried this other times and got zip.  So like all worm hatch fishing, sometimes it works, most of the time it doesn't. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do my fishing in the south side estuaries on the Cape, where the high tide is 3 hours later than RI.  Yesterday was my 2nd hatch found with still no stripers yet, with 2-5" worms.  My best year was 2014 with 28 hatches found, and 157 fish landed.  The next year only found 4 hatches and didn't catch anything, so it isn't always easy for sure.  I only use a floating to semi floating  fly and have great luck with it most of the time.  Last year, found 15 hatches with 94 fish, but on 3 of the 15 occasions did not catch any.  The secret and there are many, is to get there early in the hatch.  If you get there late on a full sunny evening, and with millions of worms, then you are more  likely to get skunked. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saturday evenings #3 hatch took place 1/4 mile further down the shallow backwater bay.  Once again plenty of worms, but no bass, only herring.  Last year at the same location and time frame and with 3 hatches, I had caught 29 stripers.  So this might tell you where we are at this year, probably due to the cold winter except for February, and the fish are a week or more late tbd. Sunday = cloudy and rainy, so will probably have to wait for the next 2-day stretch of sunny days to heat things up again especially at a different and deeper water location.  If the water temps don't drop much, I might find a cool weather mini hatch at the same location this evening.   Yesterday the water was hot at 70 degrees, so it may continue? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I am off to a poor start.  Unable to find the hatch at my 2nd location, I think I missed it this year, as it usually starts at the low temps of 61-62, and it is already at 68 degrees.  Prime time for the Ocean State now with evening high tides, and sun warmed coves etc.  Get it before rain and clouds on Saturday may cool things off?  I hope I can get back on track for the rest of my locations, schedule, and tide cycles  through the first week of June.  Good luck out there.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes every time, the temps will tell you what is going on. I plug in a  lot of notes, and refer back to them many times per year.  The more info you have the better you can figure out the many mysteries and challenges of worm hatches.   For example, I have figured out that different locations start at different times, so I plan to go to an early site from 4-5, then also schedule a late starting location at 6-7, so if nothing is happening at the first, then I have a backup plan, if both go off, then I have a double header.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's impressive, I am sure you've stockpiled a lot of data over the years.


Do you use a specific program to track this stuff, or just something like an excel doc?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

five minutes to worm hatch, five minutes to worm hatch...definitely not my waders.

 

:p

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No program, just old fashioned pen and paper, but not as much as you would think, just the important stuff.  I outline what is needed in my schedule, usually just one line per day within about 8 or so columns with brief notes.  I have a sample schedule of what you need in one of my chapters in my book "Fly Fishing the Worm Hatch."  You could learn it all on your own, but it could take you 5 years or more, a lot longer if you only find a few hatches per season.  The more you find, the more you learn.  What is it worth to read a book, well, you could learn a lot and cut down your learning curve to a couple of seasons.  I am 8 years into it, and still learning.  There are 3 different factors and as many as 9 different variables you need to figure out.  Good luck. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.