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Mike D

Backing Required

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How do I know how much backing I need under my fly line for a ROSS 6 wt reel?  I bought the reel off ebay and the box doesn't show what I need. I'd like the spool to be pretty full once I add the fly line. Is 100 yds of 30 backing good?  Thanks

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for an exact  amount you can reel the flyline onto the reel ,attach backing and reel till it's as full as you want,unspool and affix backing to the spool and reel it back on

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What S & S said, my question is if it is for a 6 wt, why 30 lb, that won't give you much, if you are fishing in freshwater  20 lb should be more than adequate.

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Posted (edited)

I use 20lb on my 7w for salt and never felt undergunned.  But then again it's more of a schoolie rod.

I also like to keep some space after the fly line is on, due to uneven reeling, but maybe that's just me, when I get a fish on reel I am a crazy reeler.

Edited by JoeSWFF

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It might be helpful if you could tell us which model Ross it is-they make several. Typically, you're probably at 100yds maybe slightly more and I wouldn't do anything heavier than 20 pound myself. What are you planning to fish for?

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Thanks for replies.  S.S. idea sounds solid.  Fly line first and then backing, remove line and reverse it back onto the reel. Thanks! I plan to use this for river smallmouth bass mostly.  I originally thought 20 lb backing but was only thinking larger to fill the spool since I doubt I'll ever need the backing.  I'll use 20 lb backing.  I may advance to fly fishing the surf someday but for now this is for some peaceful summer river fishing. Thanks

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20# backing is certainly strong enough for the job and is the traditional choice.  Personally I like to put a "blind" sliced loop in the end of the backing to attach the fly line with instead of a surgeon's loop or a nail knot.  If you do that then 30# (dacron) is easier to do that with and will still give you more backing then you will ever need.

Others already gave you the best method to determine how much backing no matter what weight (20 or 30) you decide to go with.

 

Quinn

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"I use 20lb on my 7w for salt and never felt undergunned."

For schoolies only....that would be sufficient.  Problem is, I don't know many places where schoolies exist that the occasional mongo striper does not also show up.  And, lots of us use 20# tippet.....even from shore for "schoolies" as there is always the possibility of 1) a mongo fish, 2) a blue, or 3) snagging on a rock/piling/whatever.

 The principle most of us adhere to is....from your tippet on back each component should have a greater breaking strength than the parts outward from it.  Only THAT system will guarantee that, whatever happens, your tippet will break first and you will get ALL your flyline back (intact) and ALL your backing.

 

Lots of flylines these days have a core breaking strength of greater than 20#.  It is worth checking yours.  If circumstances ever dictate that you should put on 20# tippet and you have 20# flyline and 20# backing, if anything should happen that puts you in the situation of pulling on your flyline or backing up to the breaking strength of the tippet....who is to blame if you get back only half a flyline.......or no flyline at all.  Been there.....done that.

 

I use 20# for freshwater/trout/rods below and up to 7 wt.  That 7 wt size is the conundrum because one CAN get into rougher situations AND for some manufacturers it is the last/biggest size made with 20# core.  Then the problem is resolved as long as one never uses 20# or heavier leader.  8 wt lines and above have 30# core.  All my reels for 8 wt and above have 30# backing minimum.....up to 80#. 

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2 hours ago, Peter Patricelli said:

"I use 20lb on my 7w for salt and never felt undergunned."

For schoolies only....that would be sufficient.  Problem is, I don't know many places where schoolies exist that the occasional mongo striper does not also show up.  And, lots of us use 20# tippet.....even from shore for "schoolies" as there is always the possibility of 1) a mongo fish, 2) a blue, or 3) snagging on a rock/piling/whatever.

 The principle most of us adhere to is....from your tippet on back each component should have a greater breaking strength than the parts outward from it.  Only THAT system will guarantee that, whatever happens, your tippet will break first and you will get ALL your flyline back (intact) and ALL your backing.

 

Lots of flylines these days have a core breaking strength of greater than 20#.  It is worth checking yours.  If circumstances ever dictate that you should put on 20# tippet and you have 20# flyline and 20# backing, if anything should happen that puts you in the situation of pulling on your flyline or backing up to the breaking strength of the tippet....who is to blame if you get back only half a flyline.......or no flyline at all.  Been there.....done that.

 

I use 20# for freshwater/trout/rods below and up to 7 wt.  That 7 wt size is the conundrum because one CAN get into rougher situations AND for some manufacturers it is the last/biggest size made with 20# core.  Then the problem is resolved as long as one never uses 20# or heavier leader.  8 wt lines and above have 30# core.  All my reels for 8 wt and above have 30# backing minimum.....up to 80#. 

To add on to Peter's point, 20# backing is also quite thin. I would go up in breaking strength just for better handling properties, especially with braid.

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Posted (edited)

I use 40lb power pro hollow ace on everything from a tiny little tibor spring creek (about 45 yds) to an abel 11/12N (350 yds). Breaking strength isn't typically a concern (40lb hollow tests out at an average of 72lbs) I just like clean rigging and hate mildew/dry rot. For my big reels it's a necessity, does everything 30lb micron will and then some. It also lays flat under tension and will never, ever dig or bind.

Edited by Local66

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