TroutGhost

Do Fiberglass Rods Have a Place in Fishing Today? Or Obsolete?

44 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

12 hours ago, TroutGhost said:

Do fiberglass rods still have a purpose in saltwater angling today?

There's only one purpose for fiberglass rods today -- catching fish.  Over a decade ago Ditch Jigger wrote this about the Lamiglas 121-3m:

 

"It's a fine rod--one of the best glass rods out there. Very versatile. You can throw 1-1/2 oz plugs, or 5 oz and bait, or anything in between, plus have the backbone to lift a 5 oz jig off the bottom in 40' of water. You can lob cast a live pogie, even."

 

DJ didn't mention, not there at least, that a 121-3m is rugged enough to turn a big striper in a 5 knot current, yet soft enough to toss a live eel without ripping the hook out of its head.  With heavy line and a rugged hook, it can pry a big bass out from under a bridge before it wraps around a barnacle encrusted piling.  And in the right hands it will cast a pogie chunk and a 4 ounce sinker over 75 yards and whip most anything likely to eat that bait.

 

A 121-3m is too long and heavy for kayak use. But, (God forbid) if you cut four feet off the butt you'd pretty much duplicate what Fenwick once marketed as their "Husky Musky" rod -- and that's a hell of a glass rod for a kayak.


There may be graphite rods that can do all that -- but not many and none for the same price.

Edited by pettypace
typo

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I never understood how a softer slower rod works a pencil popper easier; a stiff rod is more efficient at imparting action to the plug with less effort. I'm not sure what I'm missing? Maybe the softer rod creates a natural erratic nature to the action or some other perceived change to the action?

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3 hours ago, rollincoal said:

I never understood how a softer slower rod works a pencil popper easier; a stiff rod is more efficient at imparting action to the plug with less effort. I'm not sure what I'm missing? Maybe the softer rod creates a natural erratic nature to the action or some other perceived change to the action?

In my experience, the graphite rod takes more effort over the long term, because it damps faster; the rest of it, I think, is what you suggest, the softer rod allows the nose of the lure to swing more erratically.  I find that graphite tends to move the lure in a tighter side-to-side motion, that requires you to move it forward faster, while glass makes it easier to get a wider "herringbone" pattern that lets me retrieve the lure much more slowly.

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The quick return adds to the efficiency as the rod is in a predictable position so that barely moving the rod results in maximum effect and greater control. How wide the pattern is seems more a function of the tempo of pops and speed of the rod while popping. Slowing down and a good working plug results in a spook like action.

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glass rods are great for shad fishing or mackerels where the fish takes the fly or dart on the run. the softer tip lets the fish take it rather than pulling the hook.

 

also good for float tubing when a fish might take on the bottom close to you.

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4 hours ago, rollincoal said:

The quick return adds to the efficiency as the rod is in a predictable position so that barely moving the rod results in maximum effect and greater control. How wide the pattern is seems more a function of the tempo of pops and speed of the rod while popping. Slowing down and a good working plug results in a spook like action.

You can certainly use either a fiberglass or graphite rod with a pencil popper with success. The action of the rod probably has more bearing on the ease of use than the material. Since (for me) I try to time the jerk so it occurs on slack line and to feed a little slack line after the jerk so the plug will move unimpeded to the side. I personally find that a more parabolic action combined with the slower recovery of glass or lower modulus graphite makes it a little easier. But both will work as long as the  user slightly modifies his technique to compensate for the different rod materials. 

When it comes to toughness of rods graphite vs. fiberglass, I would say that fiberglass is the clear winner. In all the years prior to graphite, I remember seeing one rod broken while fishing the canal. I've seen more than that in one morning since the graphite era started. 

Use what you want - they are both good. I don't think fiberglass will ever become obsolete unless rod makers choose to make it so. It won't be because they won't work just as well today as they did 30 years ago.

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On ‎4‎/‎14‎/‎2018 at 0:53 PM, billthe5th said:

their slower action gives a lot of advantage when fighting fish, especially bottom fish that bounce and head shake a lot - cod, sea bass, porgies in particular - that shock absorption makes it harder to break off or pull/straighten hooks - especially those times when a bite is off and a smaller hook gets more bites/hooks ups, but then you have to worry about not landing better fish.

Definitely agree. I have an old Shakespeare glass rod that was rebuilt for exactly this purpose. Learned about "mooching" for Salmon without even knowing it. Really wanted to land tide-runner Weakfish when I was a kid and that Jellyworm-fooled 10 pounder in 1977 taught me that there will always be a place for slow-action rods and medium gear reels (does anyone remember True-Temper reels?)..

 

Solid glass blanks are also killer doing heavy duty deep (and I mean really deep) bottom fishing here in Florida with strong electric or hydraulic reels. I would also say that there is really no replacement when it comes to 200 pound-plus Tuna/Sharks.

 

BTW, new member saying hey!  Will be moving back to wrong island soon and look forward to being a solid, positive, contributing member of this forum.

 

I see many people are rightfully angered by regulators in terms of commercial vs. recreational take. I'm completely on board, except will say that commercial fishermen have endured incredible duress in the passed 10 years or so up and down the East coast. I was forced to kill my business down here because of Snapper closures, Grouper, Tilefish, AJ, Seabass, Trigger reduced seasons. Not making excuses for the past, but forget about being a waterman these days unless you're affiliated with big G and have ties to a lot of money funneling into DC. Thousands of people lost the only living they knew because of a combination of bad economy and closures, quotas and trip limits. Recreational fishermen are dealing with the conundrum of paying 2-300 dollars in fuel, bait, supplies tack etc. vs. keeping a fish or two... Man they can really kill industries and change lives with this garbage... Last time I will speak of such!

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Welcome to our happy home.  

 

True-Temper, gee whizz, you're putting yourself in my age bracket.  

 

Apropos of fish that can benefit from a slow/soft rod .... fluke. If they're tentative in biting, a soft rod seems to hook them better. Graphite may pull a bait away, when fishing from a drifting boat, a little too much. Glass is more tolerant of another user error, of pressuring a good flattie too hard, too. 

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Posted (edited)

Some say that glass rods are getting popular again. My trout spinning rods are glass Fenwick's and Browning Silaflex rods, they just have the feel for light touch applications compared to my St. Croix Premieres rods. Stiff or soft, fast or slow!  Pick your tool as needed....even vinyl albums are the current thing. Everything always comes full circle.  :worms:

 

FT

Edited by Fishin Technician
...

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23 hours ago, rollincoal said:

The quick return adds to the efficiency as the rod is in a predictable position so that barely moving the rod results in maximum effect and greater control. How wide the pattern is seems more a function of the tempo of pops and speed of the rod while popping. Slowing down and a good working plug results in a spook like action.

Might be personal, but I can get that "spook-like action" better with glass.

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16 hours ago, BrianBM said:

Welcome to our happy home.  

 

True-Temper, gee whizz, you're putting yourself in my age bracket.  

 

Apropos of fish that can benefit from a slow/soft rod .... fluke. If they're tentative in biting, a soft rod seems to hook them better. Graphite may pull a bait away, when fishing from a drifting boat, a little too much. Glass is more tolerant of another user error, of pressuring a good flattie too hard, too. 

I've actually gone to a long, graphite "back bouncing" rod, which has a soft tip and slow (for graphite) action, for exactly the reason you mentioned--the softness helps.  Also helps to keep from pulling out of a barely-hooked fish, which can happen when they're taking tentatively.  if I didn't have that rod (which I won in a raffle, and would never have bought on my own) I'd stick to glass for fluke.

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I wouldn't throw plugs all day with my gator glass, but I've yet to find a 37 dollar graphite blank I can bend to the butt and it won't break. All my bait rods are glass except for two I use for fishing cut shrimp and small black drum. They are heavier, but in a high impact situation glass always wins from my experience.

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Posted (edited)

low number IM carbon rods are also good in similar way

6 - 7

 

@ ohreally, trump said he will push for less regulations

if I remember corectly he claimed it will be a rule that before one new regulation is imposed two old ones have to be removed

something like that, and it is necesity

Edited by glos

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Glass rods being softer help a bunch when recovering from injuries. Before my wrist surgery I felt every hard snap of my graphite rods, switching back to softer blanks made life a lot easier. 

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