TroutGhost

Do Fiberglass Rods Have a Place in Fishing Today? Or Obsolete?

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I read somewhere that lures like pencil poppers and maybe spooks were originally worked with fiberglass rods. But when graphite came along, anglers had to adjust fishing technique to compensate for the faster tips (I think). 

 

Are fiberglass rods obsolete?

 

Do fiberglass rods still have a purpose in saltwater angling today?

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I don't have any fiberglass spinning rods but I do have a couple of fly rods (6 and 8wt).  They catch fish just fine and I find them a nice change of pace to cast.  Several years ago I picked up a cheap spinning rod which turned out to be really slow and soft.  I did not like it for most fishing situations but it really excelled at top water.  I caught many fish with it on top until it finally broke casting it one day.  With that as background, I say soft, slow rods have a place so they might as well be fiberglass.

Modern fiberglass is MUCH better than the old stuff.

 

Quinn

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I still use my Lamiglas SB136-2F at the beach quite often. It's landed fish upwards of 20#.  Casts like a dream.

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They have plenty of uses.

 

For offshore big-game applications, they work just fine, and for trolling and chumming, I prefer glass to anything else..  They're also fine for bottom fishing, etc.

 

Casting, their use is more limited, but they still have their place.  In freshwater, bass fishermen are often going back to fiberglass for crankbait rods, as the slower action both fishes a crank better and makes it harder to pull a hook during the fight.  The same slower action also makes it easier to work a pencil popper salt water, either from beach or boat.

 

And, as mentioned above, there is a mild resurgence of glass fly rods.  They're slower than graphite, and some folks like them better for low water, delicate presentation situations where precision and subtlety are more important than power.

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abso diddly lutely yes

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7 mins ago, CWitek said:

some folks like them better for low water, delicate presentation situations where precision and subtlety are more important than power.


Thanks everyone for the feedback! Very helpful!  :)
I've been fishing these kinds of low water situations. This season I'm going to be focusing on fishing lures. Some beach situations but protected by the sound.

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They are still in use, there are company out there that uses graphite and glass rod together . But I still enjoy using my vintage fenwick  trout rods from the early 70's.  The biggest thrill is landing a big fish on a light tackle. still have my old 11 footer honey rod from lamiglas.

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their slower action gives a lot of advantage when fighting fish, especially bottom fish that bounce and head shake a lot - cod, sea bass, porgies in particular - that shock absorption makes it harder to break off or pull/straighten hooks - especially those times when a bite is off and a smaller hook gets more bites/hooks ups, but then you have to worry about not landing better fish.

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I have a cheaper glass surf rod that has great feel for swimbait and crankbait lures, and obviously toowater. I use it to chuck bait once in a while when I still do that. It’s rated 1-5 and I’ve thrown 4 ounces plus a bunker head without worrying it will break. My kids have stepped on the blank and I got red in the face but I kept calm because I doubt their weight can break a glass rod.

 

i just wouldn’t expect to have a lot of light touch feel to use it for bucktails and soft plastic on jigheads, but I keep another rod around for that work. 

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9 hours ago, TroutGhost said:

I read somewhere that lures like pencil poppers and maybe spooks were originally worked with fiberglass rods. But when graphite came along, anglers had to adjust fishing technique to compensate for the faster tips (I think). 

 

Are fiberglass rods obsolete?

 

Do fiberglass rods still have a purpose in saltwater angling today?

1.  No.

2.  Yes.  Composites are lighter and will totally displace glass, eventually, but glass is incredibly tolerant of abuse and can be bent in curves that would shatter all but the finest of composite or graphite rods. Fractures from impact (say, rods colliding at a partyboat rail) still propagate fairly easily through graphite, but glass is a lot more durable.

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Have you ever fished an 8 n bait sized conventional Harnell or Silaflex with braid ?

The power, the forgiving flex while casting and fighting a fish........ Your graphites will be gathering dust

 

 

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Glass rods and modern braids are a match made in heaven.  Y'all don't know what you're missing.

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Yup, love my old glass rods. My favorite is a custom spinning rod I got in the 1970's. I've had to re-wrap it a time or two but the Fenwick blank it's built on is as good as it was when it was new. Glass rods will always have a place in my stable.

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10 hours ago, TroutGhost said:

I read somewhere that lures like pencil poppers and maybe spooks were originally worked with fiberglass rods. But when graphite came along, anglers had to adjust fishing technique to compensate for the faster tips (I think). 

 

Are fiberglass rods obsolete?

 

Do fiberglass rods still have a purpose in saltwater angling today?

sure they do,,they have plenty of great uses esp when you know how to handle them.

one of my fave big plugging sticks is glass and it has a ton of power for locking up big gators heading for the river mouth.

HH

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