hipkvw

Shooting Head Frustration!!! Question....

128 posts in this topic

22 mins ago, Local66 said:

That's Cortland C18, not my SA running line. Splicing hollow core spectra is cake. The sbs was just to show you how to splice two hollow core lines to one another.

yeah I followed. you noted same in your post. If doing the splice with the real fly and running line is anything like splicing dacron core lines to each other it is probably pretty tough. 

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1 min ago, Otshawytsha said:

yeah I followed. you noted same in your post. If doing the splice with the real fly and running line is anything like splicing dacron core lines to each other it is probably pretty tough. 

The SA stuff is difficult only because it's incredibly tight. The procedure itself is relatively simple. You won't have to do it very often, unless you spend a decade working in a fly shop.

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That's one skill that is still on my bucket list of things to learn before I quit this fly fishing stuff. 

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Ebbtide231

I fold a paper towel up so it is approximately the width and circumference of the spool with mono shooting line and backing and soak the towel strip with fresh water. Then I pull the head from the spool and wrap the soaked towel around the expose shooting line and wind the shooting head over the soaked paper towel.  That works well and towel is removed as soon as shooting head uncovers it. Alternatively, you could spool the mono shooting line and head to a dummy or plastic spool and soak that in a small tub of water and respool it on the reel just before you go fishing or simply soak the reel spool in water although there may be arguments against this because it’s not healthy for your spool.

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If you want some great info on dealing with mono running lines do a google search on "Bill Nash fishing tips". Look for the item Bill "The Knot Man" Nash. He gives you info on soaking and stretching the mono running line to make it more manageable. He also details a method of adding a braided loop to the mono running line. He also has a bunch of other tips that are worth reading.

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10 hours ago, Ebbtide231 said:

OK, stupid question time.

 

For the guys using mono and mentioned having to soak it for a couple hours ahead of time.

How?

You can't be soaking the whole reel....

Filling a basin and stripping off the length you anticipate using?

 

Thanks for bearing with me :)

Just dump the spool in a bucket full of water. 

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3 hours ago, jabster said:

Just dump the spool in a bucket full of water. 

There are some guys here that use mono running lines in the surf for snook with decent results, but the rigging never sat right with me. Now granted, most of the snook they're targeting are right at their feet, and they don't require the same things from a running line that I do. While I'm more than capable of working the inside with a braided mono running line, the real benefit is how fast I can present a fly to a fish at a relatively stupid distance. One single water haul to load, then blast it out 100' or more depending on the height of the break and the wind direction. Standing on the platform of a boat or a jetty rock 2-3ft above the surface of the water and you can really dump it. If you're fishing density compensated, it's really about covering water. Soaking and stretching a slick running line just doesn't make any sense to me. I really did try to like them, they're definitely easier on the wallet. 

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Thin mono shooting line has positive effect to casting range which is about the same what one line weight class heavier line does. So when there is no wind a 9wt 300gr shooting line casts about the same a WF10 line does. But when casting to tail wind light mono SL shoots significantly better but unfortunately tail wind is rare when SW fishing. It is the shooting/running line weight which line head needs to accelerate which waste cast energy. Friction against guides and blank also waste energy but in my tests its effect is smaller than the weight of shot line. And then when casting to common head wind the difference between WF and SH gets smaller but it seems SH is still slightly better and using longer overhand length which head wind makes possible favors a SH use. Only major disadvantage of thin mono SL is that it does not stay in stripping basket when it is windy. In longer line tray spikes the mono SL stays better but when it is very windy coiling mono line to line hand fingers or changing to a coated SL are good options.

 

Lengthening overhang is the trick where more casting distance is quite easy to achieve using both a WF and a SH! When there is length of thin line between rod tip and line head there come few positives: Tailing Loop lessens! More common TL comes when the beginning of the casting stroke is too abrupt and rod bends more than needed and rod span shortens fast and sends a TL wave to the line but when there is longer length of light line before the line head mass follows there comes smaller TL wave. Somebody might think that it is not good to cast TL because it is a fault but the thruth is that when very long cast is a goal some TL comes very easy. Also using overhang it is possible to use wider casting stroke without line loop size increase when rod tip path which evidently turns more and more down does not pull the following line head end down full effect.

 

Another TL which is rarer but comes if haul is finished too early before rod has straightened causing fast rise of rod tip is a major casting fault and should be fixed although overhand can mask it slightly. Also stopping rod too high can cause TL when rod tip rise fast. One more positive is that there comes less need to shoot line when some of it is already out if rod tip as an overhang.

 

Esa

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1 hour ago, crunch said:

Thin mono shooting line has positive effect to casting range which is about the same what one line weight class heavier line does. So when there is no wind a 9wt 300gr shooting line casts about the same a WF10 line does. But when casting to tail wind light mono SL shoots significantly better but unfortunately tail wind is rare when SW fishing. It is the shooting/running line weight which line head needs to accelerate which waste cast energy. Friction against guides and blank also waste energy but in my tests its effect is smaller than the weight of shot line. And then when casting to common head wind the difference between WF and SH gets smaller but it seems SH is still slightly better and using longer overhand length which head wind makes possible favors a SH use. Only major disadvantage of thin mono SL is that it does not stay in stripping basket when it is windy. In longer line tray spikes the mono SL stays better but when it is very windy coiling mono line to line hand fingers or changing to a coated SL are good options.

 

Lengthening overhang is the trick where more casting distance is quite easy to achieve using both a WF and a SH! When there is length of thin line between rod tip and line head there come few positives: Tailing Loop lessens! More common TL comes when the beginning of the casting stroke is too abrupt and rod bends more than needed and rod span shortens fast and sends a TL wave to the line but when there is longer length of light line before the line head mass follows there comes smaller TL wave. Somebody might think that it is not good to cast TL because it is a fault but the thruth is that when very long cast is a goal some TL comes very easy. Also using overhang it is possible to use wider casting stroke without line loop size increase when rod tip path which evidently turns more and more down does not pull the following line head end down full effect.

 

Another TL which is rarer but comes if haul is finished too early before rod has straightened causing fast rise of rod tip is a major casting fault and should be fixed although overhand can mask it slightly. Also stopping rod too high can cause TL when rod tip rise fast. One more positive is that there comes less need to shoot line when some of it is already out if rod tip as an overhang.

 

Esa

Esa Do most guys not pair the shooting line with the shooting head ?   

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1 hour ago, Hook I said:

Esa Do most guys not pair the shooting line with the shooting head ?   

For fishing I use Sawada Flat Beam Intermediate. 35lbs for single hand and switch rod setups and 50lbs for DH rod setups. There is no pairing needed but lighter heads cast better with lighter shooting line. I have tried many shooting lines but Sawada FB I is best because it is stiff so it does not tangle hardly ever and its stretch is low too so contact with fly and fish is good.

 

Esa

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2 hours ago, crunch said:

For fishing I use Sawada Flat Beam Intermediate. 35lbs for single hand and switch rod setups and 50lbs for DH rod setups. There is no pairing needed but lighter heads cast better with lighter shooting line. I have tried many shooting lines but Sawada FB I is best because it is stiff so it does not tangle hardly ever and its stretch is low too so contact with fly and fish is good.

 

Esa

Very good thanks 

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Anyone using something like these with their SH setup?     If so how are they going through the guides ?

HT

 

swivels.png.fff7535feac2862dbfe28669602c77f2.png

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13 hours ago, jabster said:

Just dump the spool in a bucket full of water. 

Thanks.

Occam's Razor rides again.

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4 hours ago, HillTop said:

Anyone using something like these with their SH setup?     If so how are they going through the guides ?

HT

 

swivels.png.fff7535feac2862dbfe28669602c77f2.png

Ugh. Really? I'm dying to know what you guys are doing to put twist in your running lines. I consider myself to be a slightly above par caster, that occasionally indulges in substances that put me well below par (I have a few shirts that look like they've been hit with bird shot). But there's no twist, ever. Blind casting for musky, making 1000 hail mary casts a day with a type VI head, and I don't get line twist. 

 

 Esa, could you explain your rigging with the flat beam? And how the hell do you set a hook with that stuff? I had issues with it slipping through my hands on a strip strike.

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Posted (edited)

I tend to sidearm the backcast and then come forward more vertically I think this adds twist.  

 

Here's some info. on it. I guess these bros don't fish saltwater rods with fighting butts which allow you to remove twist very easily

*

 

Belgian Cast

Put quite simply this cast is a side cast in the back cast, followed by an overhead cast in the forward. It is very useful for (a) acquiring distance very quickly (b) keeping flies apart on a multi-fly leader and (c) casting with the wind.

The disadvantage of this cast is that it throws a half twist in the line every cast. Half twists add up! So it's best to use this cast sparingly, otherwise you will have to get into the habit of removing the reel from the rod, every 30 casts, or so, in order to spin the twists out.

One fishing partner of mine, who uses this cast for most of his fishing, has the infuriating habit of casting his line out, unspinning the twists, refitting the reel (all very casually you understand) and bringing in the slack only to discover he has hooked a fish, which he promptly lands with deft skill.

One excellent reason for performing this cast is that (with slightly too much power), once the loop has straightened out on the backcast, it will kick around to the side. With an overhead backcast the loop will flip over downwards.

A side cast is excellent for casting narrow loops which makes this cast perfect for casting with a following wind. A tight low backcast followed by an open forward loop. Remember to haul as you stop on the backcast, and through the stroke on the forward cast.

Since the backcast can be presented very low to the water, this is an excellent cast for making a high forward cast.

Edited by TimS
Please don’t post commercial links here

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