hipkvw

Shooting Head Frustration!!! Question....

128 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

I use heavy sinking heads for offshore. 

The best running lines for me have been old floating lines. 

I chop off the head off 8 or 9 wt floating lines and use the running line section. 

I don’t switch heads around so I splice the running line to the head using a section of hollow Dacron.  I have managed to avoid hinging weakening the Dacron joint by overlapping the running line and the head by a few inches. 

Edited by Tunataker

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i use shooting heads exclusively for steelhead and quite a bit for smallmouths . the ability to adapt to different water conditions i encounter on the river and the convenience of not carrying multiple spools out weighs the issues with line tangle . wet and stretch your line before you go out . as others have said , spin your rod to remove twist and be aware of how retrieve your line . there is a video regarding gathering your loops so as not to twist your line as much while doing it . andrew moy has posted that . you can also shoot your line out w/o a fly and let the current work it . i think if it required nail knotting the head and the running line i would stick to integrated lines .  kinda defeats the purpose of a head if you ask me . i've used swivels between the head and the leader before , but they seem to invite "wind " (bad casting ! ) knots and talk about catching in the guides ! just my experience . 

 thanks , jim

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7 hours ago, Tunataker said:

I use heavy sinking heads for offshore. 

The best running lines for me have been old floating lines. 

I chop off the head off 8 or 9 wt floating lines and use the running line section. 

I don’t switch heads around so I splice the running line to the head using a section of hollow Dacron.  I have managed to avoid hinging weakening the Dacron joint by overlapping the running line and the head by a few inches. 

If I ever use them again this is the approach I would take. Being that the heads cost as much as the full lines and changing them is not as simple as it actually was designed to be....meaning splicing etc....its just as easy to switch lines or just have a spare spool or other rod rigged. Going to stick with full lines for now.

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2 hours ago, jimlucey said:

i use shooting heads exclusively for steelhead and quite a bit for smallmouths . the ability to adapt to different water conditions i encounter on the river and the convenience of not carrying multiple spools out weighs the issues with line tangle . wet and stretch your line before you go out . as others have said , spin your rod to remove twist and be aware of how retrieve your line . there is a video regarding gathering your loops so as not to twist your line as much while doing it . andrew moy has posted that . you can also shoot your line out w/o a fly and let the current work it . i think if it required nail knotting the head and the running line i would stick to integrated lines .  kinda defeats the purpose of a head if you ask me . i've used swivels between the head and the leader before , but they seem to invite "wind " (bad casting ! ) knots and talk about catching in the guides ! just my experience . 

 thanks , jim

I agree that splicing lines is pointless and defeats the purpose all together. I do have 2 Two-Handed rods with shooting head systems for the few times a year for the rivers I get to. Thanks for the advice on the video about gathering line. Im going to check it out. 

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Shooting heads are the most common line type used by west coast salmon anglers with single hand 9 and 10 wts, mostly sinking lines.  If it was frustrating, we wouldn’t be doing it.  In addition to the running line management tips above - which are crucial - you can use your stripping hand to make an “O” or “C” shape and guide the running line to the first stripper.  It shouldn’t be needed all the time, but when the running line is misbehaving, it helps.

 

 I use mono, stretch it well.  The mono costs $1-2 per 120’, and I always keep a backup length pre-looped on a small plastic spool in my tackle bag in case of disaster.  I’ve needed it only once years ago, when I was impatient and didn’t prestretch my running line, and it was coiled and then knotted up terribly in the stripping guide.  Lesson learned

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1 hour ago, hipkvw said:

If I ever use them again this is the approach I would take. Being that the heads cost as much as the full lines and changing them is not as simple as it actually was designed to be....meaning splicing etc....its just as easy to switch lines or just have a spare spool or other rod rigged. Going to stick with full lines for now.

 

Splicing lines is not "changing lines". And the splicing technique to a floating line defeats the purpose of shooting head, which is have a very enjoyable lightweight and easy to shoot running line that lets you cover a lot of distance very easily. Splicing a full floating line's running line is like making a Rio Outbound or other weight forward type line. Still a good caster, not a shooting head.  

 

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16 hours ago, Local66 said:

I just wonder what the point of this thread was if the op had no intention of listening to anyone.

You can't reject a shooting head because it's inanimate, but if you can solicit earnest help from people who want to help you learn how to use it effectively and enjoyably, then you can reject them as a kind of substitute for the shooting head. I think that's what happened here.  

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4 mins ago, Otshawytsha said:

 

Splicing lines is not "changing lines". And the splicing technique to a floating line defeats the purpose of shooting head, which is have a very enjoyable lightweight and easy to shoot running line that lets you cover a lot of distance very easily. Splicing a full floating line's running line is like making a Rio Outbound or other weight forward type line. Still a good caster, not a shooting head.  

 

Exactally

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I am right hand caster and need to rotate the rod clockvise to remove twists. Threre flat mono SL also is good because it is easy to remove twists reeling SL thru fingers without shooting head. Factory made welded loops can be dipped to acethone which softens the coating and it comes off easy and then loop runs inside rods very easy.

 

Esa

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2 hours ago, hipkvw said:

If I ever use them again this is the approach I would take. Being that the heads cost as much as the full lines and changing them is not as simple as it actually was designed to be....meaning splicing etc....its just as easy to switch lines or just have a spare spool or other rod rigged. Going to stick with full lines for now.

 

You should only buy cheapo or clearance lines and then cut them down to turn them into heads. 

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Posted (edited)

1 hour ago, crunch said:

I am right hand caster and need to rotate the rod clockvise to remove twists.

Esa

That's funny. I have to rotate counterclockwise. Do you have a pretty much over hand cast as opposed to like a Belgian and sidearm casts?

Edited by Otshawytsha

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Most of my flyfishing is for Stripers/blues/albies and warmwater species. I do trout and salmon in the winter occasionally. I appreciate all the tips because I do have shooting head systems on my two-handers. For my Inshore escapades I am going to stick with full lines. Thank you again for all the tips. They will be put to use with my two-handers. 

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50 mins ago, hipkvw said:

Most of my flyfishing is for Stripers/blues/albies and warmwater species. I do trout and salmon in the winter occasionally. I appreciate all the tips because I do have shooting head systems on my two-handers. For my Inshore escapades I am going to stick with full lines. Thank you again for all the tips. They will be put to use with my two-handers. 

 

HipK, Can you describe the connection between your shooting head and shooting line. What kind of loops, knots, and how big is the loop in the shooting line?

 

You seem to keep seizing on the worst advice in this thread while totally ignoring all the good constructive stuff. 

 

 

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On 4/10/2018 at 7:11 AM, Local66 said:

 

Braided mono is my preference. Airflo and SA both make a really nice braided mono running line, and you can splice your head directly to the running line 

With the braided mono, it's low stretch? I'm guessing this makes for more fun fishing in terms of feeling the strikes? How is the memory on these lines after they have dried on a reel and can you stretch them when fishing to remove memory somewhat?

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1 hour ago, hipkvw said:

Most of my flyfishing is for Stripers/blues/albies and warmwater species. I do trout and salmon in the winter occasionally. I appreciate all the tips because I do have shooting head systems on my two-handers. For my Inshore escapades I am going to stick with full lines. Thank you again for all the tips. They will be put to use with my two-handers. 

SH for TH are even more of a pain.

 

 

Lots of noise about  SH systems but I don’t see many on the beach.

 

Mono running line on a windy exposed beach. That must be great fun.

 

Mike

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