jjdbike

Ham and bean: techniques, idetails, suggestions

35 posts in this topic

23 hours ago, jjdbike said:

Steve,

 

I mentioned Alton Brown to our school foods teacher (he’s a formally trained chef & multipule resturant owner). His eyes lit up and said “I love Alton Brown, he’s a great food scientist and has great recipes."

 

Cooking is so much fun, and rewarding. I’ve got to admit Steve, over the years I’ve learned much from you, from surf fishing to cooking.

 

Here’s the stock:

I roasted 6 smoked ham hocks & the Easter ham bone. Put them in a big roasting pan & poured in the fat. Then added the juice, fat & trimmings from Easter. I brought it to a rolling boil, then turned it down to a low boil to simmer. In about an hour & a half I’ll skim surface, then add 2 bay leaves, white pepper, a couple cloves of garlic, a bunch of fimely chopped vegtables including onions, carrots, celery, red bell pepper & Kale (like I said I wanted to make it as nutricious as possible. I’ll simmer it for another 3 or 4 hours & strain. I’ll let it cool in fridge overnight then freeze it.

 

The Beans:

I bought one pound of pinto beans, one pound of mixed soup beans. One pound of great northen beans I’ll soak the beans overnight w/ salt, garlic & onion powder. Rinse and sort.

 

The soup:

I’ll put the stock in the pan w/ the beans, very finely chopped mirepiox (carrots, onions, celery), a bay leaf, a shake of tobasco, a pinch of sugar, a few shakes of white pepper. Simmer.

 

In a large skillet

Render a lb of bacon. Remove bacon retain fat in skillet.  Saute a couple cloves of garlic, a bunch of leeks chopped. lightly brown and add to stock pot, retaining bacon fat. Chop a good deal of cubed ham, lightly brown, add to stock pot. Simmer until the beans are nearly done. Remove some beans, smash and return to pot. When beans are cooked and flavore are married, add a bunch of finely chopped Kale.

 

I have high hopes!

I’ll post a report.

JD

 

Sounds about right.  Couple of things.  A stalk or two of celery and carrot in the stock.

A yellow onion or two chopped up and saluted before adding your beans and stock.

 

Most importantly, you have one chance to impart flavor into the beans, during your soak.  3 T Kosher Salt per Qt of soaking water.  You can add garlic, onion powder at that time as well.

 

TRUST ME.   It's a game changer.

8 hours ago, jjdbike said:

Thanks Jim,

 

You’re right I’m not concerned with clear broth. I also don’t want to to be too fatty or have wierd, odd, off flavors.

Now that it sat in fridge overnight, there is quite a coating on top.

It’s fat from ham bones, juice, fat, trimmings and smoked hocks. I’m also guessing it’s geletin / protien from the bone & marrow.

Should I skim that coating on top off?

Good point :  )

JD

Skim the fat, discard the bones.

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19 hours ago, JaseB said:

Sounds about right.  Couple of things.  A stalk or two of celery and carrot in the stock.

A yellow onion or two chopped up and saluted before adding your beans and stock.

 

Most importantly, you have one chance to impart flavor into the beans, during your soak.  3 T Kosher Salt per Qt of soaking water.  You can add garlic, onion powder at that time as well.

 

TRUST ME.   It's a game changer.

Skim the fat, discard the bones.

Thanks a ton bud.

Last night I skimmed off the fat while the stock was cold. Then I gently warmed it. Strained through metal screen colander, then again through cheese cloth. I’m shocked. Started off w/ 16 qt stocker full to top. Even topped it off w/ 2 big containers of chicken stock while it was cooking. Now, after removing bones, meat & veggies, there’s at most, 5 qts left. Unless I can find a good commercial ham or pork stock, I’ll need to supplement the liquid w/ a good chicken stock.

 

That should be fine, right? I’ll make it thinner & more liquidy than I want as I know it’ll lose moisture & thicken up over time & w/ reheating, I’m looking to freeze a good bit of this.

 

I’d like to infuse a little bacon magic, & a little more umami never hurts. I’ll brown the onions, carrots, garlic & cubed ham in rendered bacon fat before adding to stew. 

 

I’ll also include another bay leaf, some fresh thyme & parsley.

The other ingredient I’d like to add for added nutrition & color, is some sort of chopped dark green, e.g kale or collards. What I’m afraid of is it getting mushy & slimy w/ freezing & reheating. I wonder if this is avoidable by not adding until the end so it starts off still a little crisp?

 

Your thoughts?

JD

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1 min ago, jjdbike said:

Thanks a ton bud.

Last night I skimmed off the fat while the stock was cold. Then I gently warmed it. Strained through metal screen colander, then again through cheese cloth. I’m shocked. Started off w/ 16 qt stocker full to top. Even topped it off w/ 2 big containers of chicken stock while it was cooking. Now, after removing bones, meat & veggies, there’s at most, 5 qts left. Unless I can find a good commercial ham or pork stock, I’ll need to supplement the liquid w/ a good chicken stock.

 

That should be fine, right? I’ll make it thinner & more liquidy than I want as I know it’ll lose moisture & thicken up over time & w/ reheating, I’m looking to freeze a good bit of this.

 

I’d like to infuse a little bacon magic, & a little more umami never hurts. I’ll brown the onions, carrots, garlic & cubed ham in rendered bacon fat before adding to stew. 

 

I’ll also include another bay leaf, some fresh thyme & parsley.

The other ingredient I’d like to add for added nutrition & color, is some sort of chopped dark green, e.g kale or collards. What I’m afraid of is it getting mushy & slimy w/ freezing & reheating. I wonder if this is avoidable by not adding until the end so it starts off still a little crisp?

 

Your thoughts?

JD

You made a "strong" stock.  Meaning concentrated.  Chicken broth would be fine, but even water will work as you have concentrated everything into your stock.   Good call on the fresh bay and Thyme, I do the same.    I like to add Kale to mine as well.   But I like it to get soft.  Mushy is not the word I'd use.  If you are intent on it staying vibrant green, I'd toss it in boiling water for a minute then put it in ice water; "shock" is the term.  But that will only work if you add the kale to the soup right as you serve it.  Which seems like a hell of a lot of work and would be worthless for leftovers.   I'd rather get the flavor of it cooked into the soup.  Can't go wrong.

 

 

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Posted (edited)

On 4/10/2018 at 9:16 AM, JaseB said:

You made a "strong" stock.  Meaning concentrated.  Chicken broth would be fine, but even water will work as you have concentrated everything into your stock.   Good call on the fresh bay and Thyme, I do the same.    I like to add Kale to mine as well.   But I like it to get soft.  Mushy is not the word I'd use.  If you are intent on it staying vibrant green, I'd toss it in boiling water for a minute then put it in ice water; "shock" is the term.  But that will only work if you add the kale to the soup right as you serve it.  Which seems like a hell of a lot of work and would be worthless for leftovers.   I'd rather get the flavor of it cooked into the soup.  Can't go wrong.

 

 

Good Morning Jace & Frineds

 

It’s done. I made about 15 qts. Mostly pinto beans, but also some great northern, some black eye peas and some limas.

 

Used my strong ham & smoked hock (and veggies, seasoning & aromatics / herbs / seasonings) stock & salt free “bold” chicken stock.

 

I brough the dry beans (added onion &  garlic powder, salt, bay leaves & white pepper) to a boil for 4 minuets, cooled & stored in fridge in the water for 24 hours. Disgarded water, rinsed. I read that this is to degas & make easier to cook evenly w/ minimal skin bursting. I used 5 lbs of dry beans.

 

Cooked 1 1/2 lbs chopped bacon, set aside & browned all veggies in bacon fat (except kale) & a few chopped onions which I set a side to add latter. Pureed the browned veggies (a good bit of carrots, onions celery, 2 heads of garlic & little red of bell pepper).

 

Added to the stock, bacon, ham, beans, pureed veggies, two large bunched of chopped kale, black & white pepper, a little bit of salt. Also, bay leaves, two bunches of flat leaf parsley, a bunch of fresh thyme leaves, a pinch of brown sugar. Also, there was a tiny hint of clove from the ham stock, along with a barley noticable hint of horseraddish & mustard from the glaze.

I actually cooked the beans in two different shifts. 2/3rd from start & 1/3rd 1/2 way in (this added more texture). 

After beans were pretty much cooked I added more chunked ham, more chopped kale, added final seasoning (white & black pepper, a little garlic & onion powder, more fresh thyme & parsley). My thinking here in adding more ham, onions, greens and herbs was similar to adding the beans in 2 shifts, i.e. the 1st bach would cook through, break down a bit and add to the stock & flavor. The 2nd batch would add texture, bite & visual appeal, especially upon reheating after freezing. I topped off w/ more stock. Also, skimed the fat & foam off throughout cooking.

 

It was quite time consumming, between cooking the stock all day, soaking the beans 24 hours, cooking the final product for 6 more hours.  I cooked it slow & gently as to not burst the beans, so I could skim & for maximum flavor. Finished product was worth it.

 

It was absolutly delicious, rich, flavorful & complex. I feel good about all of the veggies, herbs & greens & glad I skimmed the fat. It made the house smell wonderfuly. Put quite a bit in freezer. We’ll enjoy for months!

 

Thanks for all of the help and advice!

JD

Edited by jjdbike

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