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Aquacide

cold water nymphing

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a quick question - when nymphing for trout in 34/35F water at this time of year, do you use very small or larger nymphs when you go low and slow ? :shrug:

 

I was fishing a #20 BH PTN yesterday in a frigid creek and found no love at all from the late fall holdovers.

 

I wondered if they would move a little better for a big stonefly nymph ?

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It depends on the river. For example, here on the Farmington, a lot of what the trout are eating in the winter is small, such as W/S Caddis and midges. I tend to go down in pattern size in the winter, and I almost always include a midge or tiny soft hackle (18-22) pattern as the top dropper in my nymph rig.

 

Hope that helps,

 

Steve Culton

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Posted (edited)

The way that I see this , is the calorie intake worth the energy exerted to get the food source. Larger fish will pass on smaller items , but smaller fish can afford exertion for smaller items. We are talking cold / winter conditions.

 

FT

Edited by Fishin Technician
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Yes, but large trout holding in a feeding lane on the bottom don't need to exert much energy when the food is coming right at them. And if midges are what's on the menu, they're going to be eating.

 

Steve Culton

 

 

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It does not take many seconds to move between large nymphs and small nymphs.

The best creatures to answer your question will be the Trout.

 

mikey

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I usually fish small midges, but I think I will give two sizes a try.

 

thanks guys. 

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On 3/12/2018 at 2:55 PM, peanutbunkerandjelly said:

I tend to do alot better fishing streamers in the cold water.

How do you fish the streamers? Cold water technique is supposed to be low and slow , do you still swing them? Or do you strip really slow thru deep pools so streamers stay near the bottom? Thx.

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If the water is fridgid, small midges or nymphs are your best bet. The #22 al's rat midge is perfect for these temps

 

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23 mins ago, MaCe1 said:

How do you fish the streamers? Cold water technique is supposed to be low and slow , do you still swing them? Or do you strip really slow thru deep pools so streamers stay near the bottom? Thx.

Mostly swing and long slow strips. I do well with a very simple small streamer I tie it all sorts of color combos. It's a #10 nymph style hook, I put a bead head on, a sort 1/2 - 3/4 " sparse maribu tail then simple chenille wrap body. I tie them in natural colors, as well as bright combos like yellow and pink which do real good for me.

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Beats me how you play and land a reasonable size Trout on a size 22 hook and a fine tippet and in a current.

I fear I would be straightening  these fine wire hooks every time.

A reasonable sized Trout to me is at least a pound in weight.

What you Guys taking. 

 

Mikey

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I religiously trout fish all winter in NJ. I've had days where big streamers caught them for the day, and days where midges and RS2's worked. Nothing has convinced me that only small offerings work in the winter.

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23 mins ago, Mike Oliver said:

Beats me how you play and land a reasonable size Trout on a size 22 hook and a fine tippet and in a current.

I fear I would be straightening  these fine wire hooks every time.

A reasonable sized Trout to me is at least a pound in weight.

What you Guys taking. 

 

Mikey

I use 20 and 22 scud hooks by umpqua. They are a heavier gauge wire. 

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