RiverRaider

A Most Humbling Experience

66 posts in this topic

13 hours ago, MikeMc said:

 

Indeed!

My sister had a lumpectomy and 15 lymph nodes removed two days before Thanksgiving. Starts chemo and radiation three days after Christmas, **** it, indeed.

Your day will be here before you know it. :th:

 

Good luck to your FIL, RR.

Good luck and Godspeed to your sister as well Mike!!

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59 mins ago, bospa357 said:

Al, have you discussed with the VA about your exposure to Agent Orange? Even if they can't prove that the malignant lymph nodes were caused by AO, they cannot prove they weren't as well. You are entitled to be compensated. My buddy collects a check of around $600/month due to exposure being stationed near an area that was sprayed. Look into it if you haven't already. You paid the price and deserve to be compensated.

Agree,how ever in 15% of cases the origination point is never found or discovered as such they cant say yes or they cant say No, in my case this point was never found  I could but did not puruse any thing except treatment, in order for me to really gain any thing I have to be 50% disabled due to Combat to get Concurrent money meaning if I do not have 50% the VA will deduct this 600 from Navy retirement and turn right around and issue a check from VA looks like you get some thing how ever all you get is few bucks tax break. if over 50 % Combat related then a seperate check from VA and Navy Check full amount

I could have sat down and declared Broken ankle, Broken Collar Bone, Hearing loss,  Poor eye sight,No thanks  At VA hospital I look  around and see so many Vet's far worse off than me and hope they get the money I left on table, Yes your right I paid a price ,how ever i asked and was Given the Billet of Boat Captain ,hard to say You owe me,  Just a simple Thank You is enough .   Al

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2 mins ago, Al Sears said:

Agree,how ever in 15% of cases the origination point is never found or discovered as such they cant say yes or they cant say No, in my case this point was never found  I could but did not puruse any thing except treatment, in order for me to really gain any thing I have to be 50% disabled due to Combat to get Concurrent money meaning if I do not have 50% the VA will deduct this 600 from Navy retirement and turn right around and issue a check from VA looks like you get some thing how ever all you get is few bucks tax break. if over 50 % Combat related then a seperate check from VA and Navy Check full amount

I could have sat down and declared Broken ankle, Broken Collar Bone, Hearing loss,  Poor eye sight,No thanks  At VA hospital I look  around and see so many Vet's far worse off than me and hope they get the money I left on table, Yes your right I paid a price ,how ever i asked and was Given the Billet of Boat Captain ,hard to say You owe me,  Just a simple Thank You is enough .   Al

Thanks Al.

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That sucks.   Wishing your FIL all the best, RR.  I totally get what you were feeling.

 

My wife had breast cancer more than two years ago.  Fortunately, she only needed radiation, no chemo.  I went with her a couple times and it was definitely a humbling experience seeing others that looked much worse off.

 

My youngest daughter is a pediatric oncology/hematology RN who deals with the cancer **** every single day she works.  Not only with her young patients but their parents and family as well.  I don't know how she does it but I have immense respect and pride for her.

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My sister works at the B&W Hospital in their Oncology ward.

Unfortunately, she works in the section where the patients are generally terminal, so there aren't many happy endings.

 

The plus side was that when my father was diagnosed with cancer in 2001 she was able to help us cope with what to expect, and even had a doctor friend sit with my mom to answer any questions she might have. My father had lung cancer that had spread to his brain, and was inoperable, thus it was terminal.

 

My mother and I were probably best prepared for the final outcome, as we were his primary caregivers while he spent his final weeks at home.

(God bless the Hospice system!)

 

The best thing you can do is just be there for them, and do your best to maintain as normal a lifestyle as you can.

Believe me, whoever is dealing with cancer will appreciate your actions that convey a sense that "everything is going to be OK".

 

And I do agree...seeing people that are dealing with potentially life-ending conditions is TRULY humbling!

 

It tends to make people value life, family and friends much, much more!

 

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