Drew C.

Mass to end commercial bass fishing?

239 posts in this topic

11 mins ago, AJL said:

The human species is not to be trusted with the environment, or much of anything else for that matter. Which is why we require rules and regulations, to hem in our worst instincts. On a brighter note, if there was a way to take the discussion we're having in this little microcosm and disseminate it out to the greater fisher world, it might be open a few eyes and minds as to what's going on.

Feel free to share this thread anywhere and everywhere. This thread is visible to the entire globe - for free - without restriction :) 

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Being in a state that does not commercially harvest Stripers, it really sucks being on the end of the northern migration, considering the fish we release are probably harvested south of us in the fall, they don't have a chance. The fishing is not as good as it was like the early 2004, 2005 era. This bs of killing all these fish is just nuts, hate it...

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1 min ago, TimS said:

Feel free to share this thread anywhere and everywhere. This thread is visible to the entire globe - for free - without restriction :) 

I plan to do so. *thumbs up*

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I posted a link to this thread on a couple other fishing blogs/sites.  Spread the word.  There’s a long winter coming.  We fisherman should be able to figure this out if we make the effort.

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6 mins ago, nicknotsebastian said:

I posted a link to this thread on a couple other fishing blogs/sites.  Spread the word.  There’s a long winter coming.  We fisherman should be able to figure this out if we make the effort.

Unfortunately it is not up to fisherman but politicians.

And they figured this long time ago.

The championed how to make money out of it.

But yes, we have to make effort even if it is only hollering.

Maybe if we do this long enough somebody will listen.

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3 mins ago, Mircopolo said:

Unfortunately it is not up to fisherman but politicians.

And they figured this long time ago.

The championed how to make money out of it.

But yes, we have to make effort even if it is only hollering.

Maybe if we do this long enough somebody will listen.

perhaps we need to find more fisherman that are willing to be politicians (!) and identify the existing politicians that are (truly) fishermen.

 

we need to figure out what we think is best for the fish and what the majority of the fisherman want and do what we need to to make it happen.  two fronts:  one working on the solution, the other working on politcal and similar means to make it happen.

 

what and who prompted the drastic action of the 90s (?).

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34 mins ago, nicknotsebastian said:

perhaps we need to find more fisherman that are willing to be politicians (!) and identify the existing politicians that are (truly) fishermen.

 

we need to figure out what we think is best for the fish and what the majority of the fisherman want and do what we need to to make it happen.  two fronts:  one working on the solution, the other working on politcal and similar means to make it happen.

 

what and who prompted the drastic action of the 90s (?).

That’s what I am talking about, utopia!

Edited by Mircopolo

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6 hours ago, gellfex said:

There's no reason to have a comm striper fishery. But has there ever been a study of who keeps how much on the rec side? How many bass should one really be able to keep in a season? Are the head boat customers who keep 1 bass the problem because the boats are going out twice a day all season, or are the powerboat guys who are fishing several days a week all season?

 

Personally I've never kept more than 2 per season,  That's plenty of striper meat for my family, since I fish for other species too. but I'd be opposed to a catch and release only fishery. Has there ever been a proposal for limiting catch via a comprehensive tag system? Like each angler with a salt registration get 2 non-transferable tags per year? What would that do to the rec catch?

Apparently it is hard enough to count how many striped bass anglers there are let alone how many fish exist or are actually harvested, but I think it roughly averages out to a little less than a fish per person harvested; I'd be all for regulations that guards against individuals taking a disproportionate amount of fish. I'm sure the for-hires would expect to be exempted.

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15 hours ago, nicknotsebastian said:

Is there a way we can “use” the Feds (bum rush them with OUR unified plan) or is it pointless and time better spent otherwise (?).

The  Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act does not give federal managers authority to manage fish in state waters (except for a couple of circumstances that don't apply here).

 

Both the Atlantic Striped Bass Conservation Act and the Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative Management Act delegate authority for striped bass management to the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission.

 

So the feds are already involved, but they have taken a "states rights" approach and specifically delegated authority for striped bass management to state managers, acting in supposed cooperation through ASMFC.

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15 hours ago, TimS said:

Lou, I don't think there are many bass wintering over in NC waters where they can legally be fished for any longer. I could be wrong...but I don't think those netters even target stripers any longer - I think the population has restricted so much that they are very scarce in what used to be the normal northern and southern extremes of their ranges.

 

TimS

A lot of the trawler kill shown in photos from North Carolina happened in the EEZ.  Bass generally winter in the EEZ off southern Virginia and northern North Carolina.

Edited by CWitek

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1 min ago, nicknotsebastian said:

Thank you for the education.

 

So should we all start to “cc” these guys in on our concern for the bass (?) maybe add our state to our signature (?)

 

we help the bass we help all bass fishermen.  “rising tide raises all boats”

 

http://www.asmfc.org/contact/contact-us

 

 

It never hurts to nurture a working relationship with your state regulators.  There are a lot of good ones out there, and you'll find that a lot of the regulators got into the business because they're anglers themselves, and have a gut understanding of the anglers' viewpoints.  The reality is that once they're in their positions, politics and orders from above limit their options, but if you treat them like human beings you'll find that they will often be willing to listen and do what they can.  The other two reps at ASMFC are tougher.  They usually have some sort of skin in the game, and are often less receptive to input.  Some are very good, others are awful.  But you lose nothing by trying to establish some sort of relationship.

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Hopefully not an issue to put this here-  I came across an editorial letter in the Salem News on this topic published yesterday.  Just including this to further the discussion and hopefully clarify the intent of the bill that was proposed.  I am not a Stripers Forever member.

 

Letter: Striper headline misleading     

Dec 7, 2017

 

 To the editor:

Several newspapers in the North of Boston Media Group recently carried an article titled “State weighs ban on commercial striper fishing.” As the group behind the legislation cited in the article, Stripers Forever would like to correct that misleading headline.

As the target of tens of thousands of passionate recreational anglers, striped bass are the most sought after and economically important sport fish along the U.S. Atlantic seaboard. According to data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, anglers from around the world make hundreds of thousands of trips each year to try and catch a striped bass along their migratory range from South Carolina to Maine, and they spend a lot of money doing so.

 
 
 

Massachusetts is ground zero for recreational striped bass fishing, generating more than $1 billion in economic activity for the commonwealth when the fishery was at its peak. Even today, according to the Center for Ecological Economic and Ethical Education, “The recreational fishery in Massachusetts for wild striped bass dwarfs every other recreational and commercial fishery in this state.” And, according to the Center, it’s not even close. Recreationally caught wild striped bass generate 130 times more economic activity than their commercial value. What’s more, the value of the recreational striped bass fishery alone is equivalent to nearly 90 percent of Massachusetts’ total commercial fishery — finfish and shellfish combined.

 

The state’s own records show that of just over 3,000 commercial striped bass permit holders, fewer than one-third report the sale of any fish at all, while less than 6 percent historically report landing more than 1,000 pounds of striped bass per year. Far from banning commercial fishing for striped bass, our bill protects, for their lifetime, those few hard-working individuals who make a living from the sea in part by selling striped bass. What the bill does accomplish is the elimination of a loophole that allows thousands of anglers to take unfair advantage of a low cost of entry to — according to the numbers — defray the cost of their bait, tackle, gas and coffee for a day on the water.

 

The current approach to striped bass management is further evidence that the commonwealth is still clinging to a romantic but obsolete memory of what used to be — a memory that has depleted our once-abundant fisheries, including cod. Our bill is a step toward a clearer vision for the future of our state, its economy and the environment.

 
 
 
 

Michael Spinney

Striper Forever

   

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Still a pipe dream.  I like SF but their goal of an entire commercial fishery ban is misguided.  Purely a fish grab.  

They would be much better off compromising and targeting a "portion" of the fishery as no sale.  For example all bass over 40 inches are to be considered game fish.

This would still allow some commercial sale and protect a segment of the fishery.  Start small and stop trying to put comms out of business. 

Edited by DZ
spelling

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sounds like a slot limit solution (that i believe may be the simplest, practical and productive (for the fish) solution that we could expect “agreement” on within a reasonable timeframe.

 

how do we go about preparing a “collective pitch” from “all fisherman” - for the press, the regulators etc (?) - something that we start by agreeing represents our collective interests and what we think Is a best solution at this time for the fish and the fishery - rec and commercial (?). 

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