Steve Schullery

fluorocarbon versus nylon leader abrasion test

55 posts in this topic

OSHA has weighed in on resistance to cutting and abrasion in the context of protective clothing. Although there is a standard procedure for measuring cut resistance, it's designed for use with fabric, not a single fiber. Also, as has been noted above, abrasion is apparently sort of an ill defined thing. Although cutting may be involved in abrasion, there's more to it, even to the extent that abrasion appears to be unquantifiable (which makes it almost like we don't know--and maybe can't know--precisely what we're talking about!)  Here's a bit of what Googling turned up on the OSHA website:

 

In general there are two types of cut hazards:

1) Clean, sharp edge cuts, such as knife blades and clean edge sheet glass.

2) Abrasive cut hazards. These include: rough edge sheet metal; stamped or punched sheet metal; and rough edged sheet glass.

Clean Sharp Edge Hazards 
Our industry currently measures cut resistance for clean sharp edges with the Cut Protection Performance Test (CPPT) on ASTM Standard F1790-97. This test measures the weight (in grams) required to cut through a glove on a 25 millimeter pass using a razor-sharp blade.

...

Abrasive Cut Hazards 
At present, there is no test to measure abrasive cut resistance in gloves. The ASTM F1790-97 standard is often used as a reference point, however, we must keep in mind that this standard tests with a razor-sharp blade. Abrasive cut hazards do not just cut, they tear and abrade and consequently require a different type of glove for protection.

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Posted (edited)

Wow.  Show-off!

 

Next time you hook a snook and it heads for barnacle covered mangrove roots.......I'll let you two sort it out.

 

As in....."should I have used a CLEAN EDGE RESISTANT leader material......or........should I have used an (undefinable)-ABRASIVE-CUT-RESISTANT material........(currently untestable since the problem is.......ah....... undefinable).

 

Can you tell it's effectively winter and pre-hibernation torpor has set it?  Just remember.....WHO started this thread?

Edited by Peter Patricelli

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Posted (edited)

All I know is I would rather deal with the abrasion factor of a Snook on my thumb much more than the cutting factor of a Bluefish on the same thumb.

Edited by bonefishdick

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Not sure about the  abrasion resistance advantages of fluoro over mono but I'm convinced that fluoro is more prone to shock than mono. Maybe because mono stretches more but I've been busted off numerous times on fluoro with shock takes. Its also not as good for knotting. I still always use fluoro but stick to 2 trusted brands. 

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9 hours ago, Peter Patricelli said:

...  Can you tell it's effectively winter and pre-hibernation torpor has set it?  ...

I was just thinking the same thing. Looks like it could be a long winter.

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11 hours ago, ginclear said:

And what brands do you trust?

 

Seaguar and Varivas 365 as I can get these in the UK.  I didn't have any issues with RIO fluoroflex either to be fair. I use 12lb, 15lb and 19lb.

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I had better  luck with Albies once I switched to a 16 lb flouro leader  I def had better results than comparable ande.  It was working so I stuck with it. And didn't really go back and reexamine the whole thing.  But I guess I'll do more testing myself. 

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Funny but when I read what JRT said about Rio Fluoroflex I never thought about it as Fluorocarbon and I guess that is because of how Rio Brands their tippet with the word flex on the end of a lot of their products. I use Rio a lot when trout fishing, mostly the Powerflex or Suppleflex which are both Mono.

 

My question is didn't Rio at one time make a tippet that was a combination of Fluoro and Mono. I checked and could not find it. I thought maybe that might be a happy medium.

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4 hours ago, bonefishdick said:

My question is didn't Rio at one time make a tippet that was a combination of Fluoro and Mono. I checked and could not find it. I thought maybe that might be a happy medium.Funny but when I read what JRT said about Rio Fluoroflex I never thought about it as Fluorocarbon and I guess that is because of how Rio Brands their tippet with the word flex on the end of a lot of their products. I use Rio a lot when trout fishing, mostly the Powerflex or Suppleflex which are both Mono.

 

It was Yo-Zuri who made the hybrid, aimed at the spinning line market. Discontinued a few years ago, I believe.

 

 

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Nylon monofilament gets considerably weaker than the stated breaking strain when it's immersed in water. Nylon absorbs between 6% and 9% of its weight of water.  Reference.

 

I don't know how it affects abrasion (still looking for references) but it can't be good if it's already 20% to 40% weaker than you think it is while you're fishing.

 

Cheers,

Graeme

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Graeme thanks for the Reference, I read it and I am not a scientist but between the article and your explanation this is what I reached as a conclusion in it's most simple form in my mind and I am not sure if it sound or not but you can let me know.

 

If mono when wet after absorbing water looses 20 to 40% of it's breaking strength then when I use 30 lb test then at some point I will be fishing with something the has a realistic breaking strength of between 18 to 24 pound test. Would that be a correct assumption on my part. 

 

If that is true then I think i would be good with that if it had a good abrasion factor.

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Posted (edited)

Here's what some of the Yo-Zuri hype stated:

 

"Yo-Zuri Hybrid is the first and only fishing line that molecularly bonds nylon and fluorocarbon during extrusion."

 

I'm not sure exactly what is meant by "molecularly bonds". Normally, extrusion does not involve new chemical bond formation, just melting, squeezing, mixing, shaping, cooling, etc. That would result in what's called a blended polymer, as opposed to a true co-polymer, which has a mix of different monomer types all covalently linked in the same polymer chains. I also recall that some companies a while ago were selling nylon line with a fluoro coating. All of this, of course, was an effort to get the best of both worlds, or at least to allow such a claim.

 

In any event, the reviews were all over the map as far as the quality and performance of Yo-Zuri went--as reviews tend to be. What jumped out at me was the frequency of comments about its terrible abrasion resistance.

Edited by Steve Schullery

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