fish taco

Bald Eagles in NJ

68 posts in this topic

They are pretty cool to watch, squawking or not.  The ones across from the canal start working on their nest in January and are sitting on the eggs by mid February.  The river in the area (and all the way to New Brunswick) is rather shallow and full of carp and quillbacks, which I guess would be easy pickin's.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, Pleco said:

Alan, one nest is near Raritan somewhere on the Duke Estate, maybe they're the ones you see. The other nest is on Cyanamid/Pfizer property upstream a mile or so from Bound Brook and is easily seen from the canal towpath. 

As the eagle flies the Duke's nest is probably 6-8 miles from my property, so that is what I assumed. I secretly wonder if there are other nests nearby that are undocumented. I am also about 80% sure that I saw a golden eagle on my property this summer. It was dusk, so lighting was not great, but it was a HUGE creature, too big to be a juvenile bald, and too big to be anything else. Haven't seen him/her since though, so I am not sure. 

Neat stuff. I've lived in this area all my life, and I have never seen eagles up until 4-5 years ago. 

Alan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is  a nesting pair on my gun club in rockaway and two on Lake hopatcong. Funny story. I had a couple guys from queens NY come down to look at a boat I was  selling. I took them out on lake Hopatcong for test drive and one of the eagles came down a grappled a trout right in front of them.  They went a nuts.  

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BALD EAGLES MOVE INTO ASBURY PARK NORTHWEST NEIGHBORHOOD

NATIONAL BIRDS SET UP HOME NEAR HIGH SCHOOL FOOTBALL FIELD
 
By Michelle Gladden
 

A pair of bald eagles have moved into Asbury Park. For the past two months these birds of prey have been sighted at the edge of the high school football field, on the same light stanchion.

“I’ve been tracking their patterns,” said nearby resident Garrett Giberson Jr. “I go over there almost every day to see where they are and what they are doing.”

Deal Lake Commission Chair Don Brockel said the pair seem to be readying to start a family. And IMGP0913-e1512489042916-277x300.jpgwhile he is not sure if the female is a local bird, the male was identified through a tracking band.  

“He’s not a local bird,” Brockel said. “We’ve confirmed through a wildlife observer that he is a banded bird, approximately 8-years-old.”

Brockel said the male was injured near Watertown in upstate New York a few years back. He was released a year later after being nursed back to health. He then moved on to Maryland before making his way to the city by the sea. 

“They seem to be mating,” Brockel said. “Where they will make a nest, we don’t know.”

The once endangered sea scavenger prefers a wetland habitat, like seacoasts, rivers, large lakes and marshes. Their lifespan is an estimated 20 years and they are known to reach speeds of over 40 miles per hour.

“Saturday was an amazing sight,” Giberson said. “A couple of red tail hawks came into their air space and they gave chase up Seventh and Eighth avenues, then returned their perch. Their wingspan is massive – to see them swoop up over your car and up the street [is quite a sight].” 

Both men say the birds are often spotted together.

“I’m guessing they are looking to build a nest somewhere in the area; on the post or in the taller trees,” Giberson said. “They are right near a great source for food.”

Although bald eagles are common to the area [with sightings in Neptune, Wall and Manasquan], Giberson said he’s never seen a pair take up residencey the way these two have.

“I haven’t named them but I was thinking about it,” he said, before issuing a PSA. “People do need to understand that they should not try to disturb them or get close to them.”

And, although the bald eagle was officially removed from the federal government’s endangered species list in 1995, they are the nation’s bird and considered sacred by some North American cultures.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We've had a nesting pair in our town the last couple years. 2 years ago they took over an osprey perch for the winter right in my backyard across the river. I'd see them every day and on a few occasions, I'd kayak over and take pics. The pic with both of them was taken from my back deck with a zoom lens one morning before work. There was one day where a juvenile was also in town. I have some crummy pics of it chasing sea gulls but I can't find them. Last winter they picked another spot across town up in a tree. I drive by the nest all the time but haven't seen them back yet this winter nor have I seen them flying around.

 

post-468-0-28048300-1449801797.jpg

post-468-0-63135000-1447476744_thumb.jpgpost-468-0-75348100-1489611635.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a chart with the number of eagles in NJ over the past 30 years.  They really made a comeback after the banning of DDT.

Capture.PNG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Posted (edited)

On 11/28/2017 at 10:08 PM, fish taco said:

Saw the snowy owl discussion in the reports thread and wanted to check with the bird experts here.  How rare are bald eagles in NJ?

 

A pair of bald eagles were hanging out by my inlaws house in MoCo over the entire holiday weekend.  They were carrying sticks back and forth - is it possible they are building a nest?  What do these things eat in NJ?  Hitting the bunker schools like osprey?

Eagles are Very large Fish Hawks! I saw a young eagle force an Osprey to drop his fish and steal it on one of the Highlands, NJ beaches right in front of a bather.

 

Pretty Cool!  The Hudson river has been hatching and expanding the number of Eagles in NJ, NY and CN for the past 40 yeaars.  If you go two Thirds aroud the Circle their is a County Park and Kayak launch area.  The southern terminus of the Hudson River Eagles is Wappenegers Creek at the Route 9 Circle just a few miles north of Peekskill, NY.

Edited by RJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/5/2017 at 8:18 AM, Gilbey said:

As the eagle flies the Duke's nest is probably 6-8 miles from my property, so that is what I assumed. I secretly wonder if there are other nests nearby that are undocumented. I am also about 80% sure that I saw a golden eagle on my property this summer. It was dusk, so lighting was not great, but it was a HUGE creature, too big to be a juvenile bald, and too big to be anything else. Haven't seen him/her since though, so I am not sure. 

Neat stuff. I've lived in this area all my life, and I have never seen eagles up until 4-5 years ago. 

Alan

we do get golden eagles in the winter, but i've never heard of a verified summer sighting, so it would be a first.

 

on average, the size of both species are almost exactly the same in terms of wingspan and overall body length, though golden eagles are a bit stockier and heavier, but not by much.

 

based on that, i'd say you saw an immature baldy :th: 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Rocco for the info. You may very well be right. I am an amateur at best when it comes to ID. I just thought this bird I saw this Summer was too big to be a youngster. But with that said, their overall size is so impressive that perhaps even an immature bald appears to be four times the size of the standard red tail hawks I see everyday! 

Alan 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 mins ago, Gilbey said:

Thanks Rocco for the info. You may very well be right. I am an amateur at best when it comes to ID. I just thought this bird I saw this Summer was too big to be a youngster. But with that said, their overall size is so impressive that perhaps even an immature bald appears to be four times the size of the standard red tail hawks I see everyday! 

Alan 

size is very deceptive in without a point of reference, so for ID purposes, its really best to give that very little weight unless you have that reference to work with. 

 

eagles are close to twice the size of red-tails in terms of length and wingspan, but you are almost right on in terms of body mass. they are about four times the mass as they are much more robust bird. :th: 

 

young birds grow very fast too, amazingly fast by most standards really and thats true for pretty much every species of bird. by the time they fledge, they are just the same size as adults, though they lack the mass of a typical adult.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/3/2017 at 9:34 PM, Frugal Fisherman said:

I saw my first bald eagles this year at lake Areoflex. I was in disbelief as it flew past me. "Was that a bald eagle!?" Thankfully i was on a boat and able to get closer. It definitely was and there was another on the lake that day. I was hoping to see some divebombing but none happend. 

 

20170910_075521.jpg

Same reaction for me.  We have a pair in our yard all the time (navesink river red bank).  Its so commonplace now thst we dont even make a big deal.

 

"Oh look, the eagle....whats for breakfast."

 

They are seriously cool up close and personal.

20160418_182643.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Cool. I wonder if it's one of the ones I always see on the Shrewsbury or if there is another nesting pair close by. I've also seen a couple in the Cheesequake area on the Parkway on my way to work. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Slightly off topic, but Rocco or others, what can you tell me about blue heron habits? I have a LOT in my area which is expected with lots of water and fo,od. However last spring I found what appeared to be a grouping of heron nests down near my river. I have never seen anything like that before. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to register here in order to participate.

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.