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gadwall8

It's that time of year..... Don't soak the bird!

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You don't have to drown an already dead bird in saltwater to enjoy a tender and juicy turkey. 

 

:v:

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Thanks for the PSA, but what's the pros and cons? My buddy insists that you brine before deep frying a bird.

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you don't have to brine a turkey.

 

 

especially if the turkey is a bone-in rib roast.

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The easiest method is to not overcook the bird from the get go!  Cooked to the right temperature the bird will be flavorful and moist.  Go past that and you might as well put it on the botom of your shoes or tun it into turkey pot pie.  

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You probably don't have to brine a turkey, but I do it, partly because it has worked well for me, but mostly because doing it allows one to avoid having to put a giant dead carcass in one's refrigerator. With all the other food one typically has on hand for one of these silly deals, the turkey takes up too much valuable refrigerator real estate. 

 

This is doubly true, by the way, when yer cooking two birds, which is what I've done when we have all the aminals (sic) at are house for a holiday. It's easier to cook two smaller birds than one giant bird, and brining them in a cooler frees up a lotta space in the fridge. Pick 'em up on Wednesday (fresh-killed, never frozen), and brine 'em in a big cooler overnight, and I never have to put 'em in the icebox. 

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fill oven pan with ice. turn bird upside down. put on ice for 2-3 hrs and cover. then cook bird right way up in another pan.

 

that's how the MiL does it. she also has three fridges though.

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2 mins ago, Aquacide said:

fill oven pan with ice. turn bird upside down. put on ice for 2-3 hrs and cover. then cook bird right way up in another pan.

 

that's how the MiL does it. she also has three fridges though.

that's interesting!

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it stops the turkey breast from drying out. as chilling it makes it the last part to cook.

 

I think its from America's Test Kitchen, but I couldn't swear to it.

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1 hour ago, HugeDinghy said:

you don't have to brine a turkey.

 

 

especially if the turkey is a bone-in rib roast.

No, but try this.  Cover very liberally with kosher salt and only kosher salt the day before.  Wrap tight in saran wrap and stash in the fridge.  Cook till rare, rest then slice and add fresh cracked pepper.

 

The salt draws out the moisture, but b/c it is wrapped tight it basically becomes and saline solution and then osmosis draws the now salty juice back into the meat.  It totally transforms the flavor and texture of the meat.  You'll smack yourself the first time you try it.

 

I literally won't even cook a steak anymore unless I have done this before going to work.   But for a rib roast, give it 24 hours.

 

You're dropping coin on a nice piece of meat.  Leave the BBQ **** in the cabinet.

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Most birds come pre brined.  

 

That said.  I have tried the dry brine method with chickens.  Seams to work well.  

 

Still can not get away without soaking my turkey though.  Unless its has been done before packaging.  

 

 

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7 mins ago, JaseB said:

 

The salt draws out the moisture, but b/c it is wrapped tight it basically becomes and saline solution and then osmosis draws the now salty juice back into the meat.  It totally transforms the flavor and texture of the meat.  You'll smack yourself the first time you try it.

 

I literally won't even cook a steak anymore unless I have done this before going to work.   But for a rib roast, give it 24 hours.

 

 

 

Jase, I do the same - but why no pepper ? . I brush mine lightly with olive oil then pound salt and pepper into it and tightly wrap. I do it with steaks, rib roast and lamb too.

 

 

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35 mins ago, JaseB said:

No, but try this.  Cover very liberally with kosher salt and only kosher salt the day before.  Wrap tight in saran wrap and stash in the fridge.  Cook till rare, rest then slice and add fresh cracked pepper.

 

The salt draws out the moisture, but b/c it is wrapped tight it basically becomes and saline solution and then osmosis draws the now salty juice back into the meat.  It totally transforms the flavor and texture of the meat.  You'll smack yourself the first time you try it.

 

I literally won't even cook a steak anymore unless I have done this before going to work.   But for a rib roast, give it 24 hours.

 

You're dropping coin on a nice piece of meat.  Leave the BBQ **** in the cabinet.

dry brining isn't a new concept.

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14 mins ago, Aquacide said:

 

Jase, I do the same - but why no pepper ? . I brush mine lightly with olive oil then pound salt and pepper into it and tightly wrap. I do it with steaks, rib roast and lamb too.

 

 

Salt is a mineral.  Pepper is an organic matter.  Salt does not burn, that's why you can bake fish in a salt dome.  Pepper burns.  It may not make a huge difference in a low and slow environment, but on a hot sear over flame or black iron skillet (preferred way to cook a steak) it most definitely will burn.   Plus, pepper is best when fresh ground just before serving.

 

Used to work with an old dude who grew up on a 20,000 acre beef ranch in Argentina.  Conquistador Argentinian, not indian.   To say he was serious about his carne asada is the understatement of the year.  It was 15 years ago and I can still hear him yelling, literally, yelling at me in my office  "ONLY SALT BEFORE GRILL!"  He brought me back a box of some Sal para carne asada, that has an awesome crystal structure to it that goes really well with grilled meats.  It's not kosher, not sea salt, haven't really been able to find anything like it here. Kosher does just fine.

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