sinfish

skagit head 720 grain

23 posts in this topic

That is a lot!

do you want to overhead cast or Spey cast it?

In my humble experience, I would not go over 400-450 grain as I don’t think of any situation requiring more.  Still, I’m interested in knowing your specific context and success.

 

Have fun!

 

dc

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I'm still messing with it.  Fishing it under a bridge with little room behind me.  Overhand casts with larger deceivers.  It certainly loads the rod.  No more than two false casts. 

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A 720gr head has tremendous distance potential if caster is strong enough but when it is only 27ft the line loop run time is short and it won't cast far and is bit tricky to time the optimum line release. Even for enormous flyes in short to medium distance I would cast only 500gr line and use 12wt rod.

 

Esa

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720gr on a 9' 10wt.

Really?

Perhaps you should consider a spin rod for fishing in that location.

I'll bet it loads quite well.

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2 hours ago, crunch said:

A 720gr head has tremendous distance potential if caster is strong enough but when it is only 27ft the line loop run time is short and it won't cast far and is bit tricky to time the optimum line release. Even for enormous flyes in short to medium distance I would cast only 500gr line and use 12wt rod.

 

Esa

Thanks for this thoughtful response.  I tried it because the head was cheap and as another poster suggested, I was not adding a tip.  I studied all the formulas for two handed and spey rods and thought to try it out.  The casts are certainly not delicate and yeah, I could bring a spinning rod.  I guess you could always bring a spinning rod.

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sinfish like  you sense of humor. Ok if this is working for you then job done. Spey rods to cast 720 grains are going to be around 10 wts or 11wts rated. The AAFTM systems for two handed rods is different so you can’t reallyget read acros for your single hander.

Where you are casting you probably can’t get a huge load onto your rod due to the tight confines. Be careful if you take the same setup where you can move the rod a bit quicker as you could put  your tip at risk of breakage.

It can be fun trying to make what we have work for us even though it may not be ideal. 720 is a huge load. It is more than double a single 

hand rod in a 10 wt which is around 560 grains.

Mike

 

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I'd say a normal load for a 10wt single hand rod is 450 to 500 grains total head weight. But if 720gn cast overhead floats your boat, go for it: it's your life. :)

 

As to the original question: no, I'm not using that much weight. I can't say I ever will, either.

 

Cheers,

Graeme

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Hirdy

Seriously 500 grains for a  10wt SH rod? Nominal AAFTM first 30 feet = 280 grains. If long belly line put more of it into the air  and get to around a nominal 11wt. I cast 530 on an extremely powerful TH and on genuine  10wt rod I just can’t see it happening with great outcomes.

 

Mikey

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Posted (edited)

Mike,

 

A Rio Permit 10wt line has a head weight of 475 grains and the head is about 47' long. Any 10wt rod I have put that on has been just fine. I also use the line on 9wt rods.

 

That first thirty feet is a standard measurement distance in the AFTM system. It has absolutely no bearing on what the rod will handle and every rod is designed to carry much more than that mass when casting.

 

For instance, I like DT lines and I use them to teach. I can (and do) carry the whole 80' of my DT6 on my 6wt rod while casting. The first 30' weighs 160gn and so does the last 30'. The 20' in the middle also weighs around 160gn (no tapers involved) so I'm carrying ~480 on a 6wt rod when I'm demonstrating distance casting to my students. Does it bend? Sure it does - it's meant to. Will it break? No, it's designed to carry that load.

 

The standard is only used to describe the line. It does not limit the rod to that line mass.

 

If you're still not convinced, cut up an old line and make a shooting head from it. Grab (say) an old 8wt line that you know adheres to the standard and cut it at exactly 30'. Tie it to some mono with a nail knot and see if you are satisfied casting it 80'. I'll bet you feel like the 8wt rod isn't loading properly and you'll struggle to make a decent loop reach 80' without terrible tails. Then put that same shooting head onto your 6wt rod and repeat. That will feel much better because the 6wt rod needs about that much mass for longer casting distances. (For fitsngiggles, you can then put it on your 4wt rod and you've got a DIY OPST head, great for single hand spey casting. :) )

 

Cheers,

Graeme

Edited by Hirdy

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I'm throwing 525-575 on a short SH 12wt, 400-450 max on a similar 10wt. If you're situation requires short casts with large flies try a wulff ambush or cortland blitz in an 11wt, you'll get the short head loading you need and can still get some distance if the situation arises. I've experimented a bit with heavy lines in 10 and 12wt rods, never any that heavy though.

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720 grains in 27' is getting into bait casting territory.  You could probably roll the fly and line up into a ball and throw it just as far as it casts.  

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