CaryGreene

Best Herring Imitations & How You Fish Them

139 posts in this topic

Posted (edited)

Thank you woodbugger21,

 

Some of the absolute coolest fishing for Big Bass is done at night, during the Herring Runs along the New England coast. Numerous tidal creeks can get serious pushes of full grown 9' to 12" Atlantic Herring. This incredible phenomenon gets to be very predictable, once the run is on. Bass lurk up into shallow water and can be found keying on incredible schools of panicking Herring who are desperately trying to make their way up stream to spawn.

 

The Herring begin to mass and congregate under the complete cover of darkness before they make their epic pushes up and into the creeks.

 

An infrared lens on a very powerful rechargeable light is a tremendous way to view all of this activity without spooking the scariest pods of Herring and as an added bonus, you might just get to see some huge stripers lurking below the bait fish, their red eyes will almost scare you as you watch them, they appear as ghost like leviathan or monsters, they even look evil. They are caught in the act. Killing. Killers. Because of your admiration of the Herring, the Bass will startle you

 

I have "shined" from over-looks and bridges for many years and have witnessed some startling frenzies in some of the most unexpecting places.

 

Tidal brooks take on a marshy eerines as the misty night air sets in. Communities are mostly sleeping as this is all going on, the houses line the edges of many favorite spots, their lights long dimmed or extinguished.

 

Blue Heron often stand near you and stare back like the completely wild, seemingly prehistoric, creatures that they are. Their presence is always a good sign.

 

Countless nights I've parked in a sketchy spot, walked along a road, hopped a fence, fished behind a bar that was closing...do this for long enough and you become a shadow, one who is wary of turning on a white headlamp light for fear of the consequences.

 

One shine from such a light will of course reveal exactly what is going on, but it will also cause the water to explode as the Herring completely panic and race for cover. The entire pool may be spooked for several minutes or even longer.

 

Your ears begin to hear the night noises, the sounds of large tails smacking the surface right in front of you are not soon forgotten.

 

Herring Runs are epic, lasting for many weeks and are therefore very important. Fishing them hard, if at all, is not for everyone.

 

Most "creek stalkers" Fly-Fish for Herring & tie completely sick looking very large flies. I would be one of those dudes. I ride a blacked out fat tire bike so I can bring additional gear. The game involves waders, head lamps with red/white lenses, packable layers as it can get frosty cold, a thermos or two, your night plug bag all set up with the usual choices which for me are pre rigged 9' Sluggos, Yum Houdini Shad, Double Wide Hogy's, Mambo Minnows, SP Minnows and a few Bombers. I also bring a few pencils and a large Pikie or Metal-Lip or Bottle Darter for the times night turns into morning and I'm still fishing.

 

If you dedicate yourself to Herring fishing, just go get an 8' Century Slingshot rod, or maybe a 9' Ron Aara. It is so worth it. These types of rods are a stellar investment as they throw lighter plastics & lures and allow you to work them. You have to "make" plastics come to life. They are expenive. But, if you buy one you won't regret the purchase.

 

If you find a creek-mouth, as the tide rises, you want to begin fishing here. Herring slip into the water near the creek mouth and seem to wait out in the deeper water. This is where you have your first chance to do well. Try VERY slow retrieves either a Bomber. Try fluttering a Mambo. Stick type baits like these can kill it. Make sure you have the Wonderbread or Mother of Pearl baits as well as the specific Mambo imitations. They are both lethal baits.

 

Move up the creek as the Stripers follow the Herring. Herring of course like spawning in very skinny water. So 40lb. Bass at some point will not be able to make ithe further up than certain points. Look for these places before high tide & position yourself upstream of them with an advantageouscasting angle. As the tide turns, the Bass hold in these deeper plug pools.

 

As the tide starts to drop, the Bass must retreat. The Herring now must run the gauntlet back out to open water. It is here where they are at their most vulnerable & big bass will be waiting to ambush them as they attempt to escape. Bass like to cruise parallel to the beach under these conditions. Look for troughs 15 to 50' out and dump soft plastics and Bombers into them.

 

Time is now dwindling, your window is closing. As the water goes out, morning often approaches. Casting distance suddenly becomes a big issue. Reach for the SP Minnow & take your best shot.

 

Outgoing water can become strong. If you can post up near first light in a beachfront spot at the mouth of the creek, this would be a good time for the Pikey. Let the water take it 100 yards or more. Then start to bring it back. You'll feel the "Thump, Thump, Thump" as it slowly swims. Viscous explosions can still occur. Be ready.

 

As first light hits, you might need a Pencil. If any fish are showing, reach them and hang the pencil in the zone as long as possible. I love the Guppy and the Super Strike Sinking Little Necks for this. Also, the Super Strike Stubby Bullet can be awesome for long distance work. Move the bullet side to side, pump, pump, jerk the tio, repeat.

 

I often marvel at how "smartly" Herring have evolved. Their run is so cool. They are little brilliantly colored warriors. They slip in and out with great stealth. Herring are a critically important baitfish in our ecosystems. Their run should be observed with respect. It is a privilege to fish among the Blue Herons and to walk the sacred creeks & beach fronts.

 

The quarry you seek to catch must be fooled with imitations of nature's coolest bait-fish. This is a game you will loose, more often than you will win.

 

The stubble will set in on your face. You will begin to lose touch with reality. Night-time is lonely. It is quiet. Find a friend you can fish with. Doing what I describe alone is sketchy. Hang on to your sanity.

 

You will also run into all sorts of unexpected potential threats. Bears? Check. Coyotes? Check. Bobcats in Heat? Check. Foxes? Check. Fisher Cats? Check. Drunk Drivers returning from bars while you'Re walking the side of the road? Check. Are yiu readin' my drift here?

 

Be prepared. Stay safe. As good as you think you've become, one slip from the end of a jetty, alone in the dark...that's all it takes. Safety first.

 

You will begin to look forward to an egg & cheese sandwich on a roll, a coffee and then a quick nap. Your adventure from the previous night will now be over as it melts into yesterday's trip and tomorrow's plans ...but your dreams will just be beginning.

 

At some point, you will know that you belong to the fraternity of night fishermen. Your spotlight will be in the back seat charging and you'll take many a ride at night, just to look. You will want to know the "pulse" so you can anticipate your next series of moves.

 

You will realize that despite all you now know & have experienced, that you know nothing. It is then that your angling journey truly begins. Because it becomes just a part of who you are. A small, insignificant being filled with passion for the wild.

Edited by CaryGreene

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Thank you I'm glad you liked it! Those are VMC Inline hooks. #1/0 for very small lures, #2/0 foremost lures like a Super Strike Little-Neck 2 oz size, 3/0 for most normal sized plugs and 5/0 for the larger plugs like the Shimano Orca and the really big Danny Swimmers.

Crushing the barbs on the inlines?

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Thank you woodbugger21,

 

Some of the absolute coolest fishing for Big Bass is done at night, during the Herring Runs along the New England coast. Numerous tidal creeks can get serious pushes of full grown 9' to 12" Atlantic Herring. This incredible phenomenon gets to be very predictable, once the run is on. Bass lurk up into shallow water and can be found keying on incredible schools of panicking Herring who are desperately trying to make their way up stream to spawn.

 

The Herring begin to mass and congregate under the complete cover of darkness before they make their epic pushes up and into the creeks.

 

An infrared lens on a very powerful rechargeable light is a tremendous way to view all of this activity without spooking the scariest pods of Herring and as an added bonus, you might just get to see some huge stripers lurking below the bait fish, their red eyes will almost scare you as you watch them, they appear as ghost like leviathan or monsters, they even look evil. They are caught in the act. Killing. Killers. Because of your admiration of the Herring, the Bass will startle you

 

I have "shined" from over-looks and bridges for many years and have witnessed some startling frenzies in some of the most unexpecting places.

 

Tidal brooks take on a marshy eerines as the misty night air sets in. Communities are mostly sleeping as this is all going on, the houses line the edges of many favorite spots, their lights long dimmed or extinguished.

 

Blue Heron often stand near you and stare back like the completely wild, seemingly prehistoric, creatures that they are. Their presence is always a good sign.

 

Countless nights I've parked in a sketchy spot, walked along a road, hopped a fence, fished behind a bar that was closing...do this for long enough and you become a shadow, one who is wary of turning on a white headlamp light for fear of the consequences.

 

One shine from such a light will of course reveal exactly what is going on, but it will also cause the water to explode as the Herring completely panic and race for cover. The entire pool may be spooked for several minutes or even longer.

 

Your ears begin to hear the night noises, the sounds of large tails smacking the surface right in front of you are not soon forgotten.

 

Herring Runs are epic, lasting for many weeks and are therefore very important. Fishing them hard, if at all, is not for everyone.

 

Most "creek stalkers" Fly-Fish for Herring & tie completely sick looking very large flies. I would be one of those dudes. I ride a blacked out fat tire bike so I can bring additional gear. The game involves waders, head lamps with red/white lenses, packable layers as it can get frosty cold, a thermos or two, your night plug bag all set up with the usual choices which for me are pre rigged 9' Sluggos, Yum Houdini Shad, Double Wide Hogy's, Mambo Minnows, SP Minnows and a few Bombers. I also bring a few pencils and a large Pikie or Metal-Lip or Bottle Darter for the times night turns into morning and I'm still fishing.

 

If you dedicate yourself to Herring fishing, just go get an 8' Century Slingshot rod, or maybe a 9' Ron Aara. It is so worth it. These types of rods are a stellar investment as they throw lighter plastics & lures and allow you to work them. You have to "make" plastics come to life. They are expenive. But, if you buy one you won't regret the purchase.

 

If you find a creek-mouth, as the tide rises, you want to begin fishing here. Herring slip into the water near the creek mouth and seem to wait out in the deeper water. This is where you have your first chance to do well. Try VERY slow retrieves either a Bomber. Try fluttering a Mambo. Stick type baits like these can kill it. Make sure you have the Wonderbread or Mother of Pearl baits as well as the specific Mambo imitations. They are both lethal baits.

 

Move up the creek as the Stripers follow the Herring. Herring of course like spawning in very skinny water. So 40lb. Bass at some point will not be able to make ithe further up than certain points. Look for these places before high tide & position yourself upstream of them with an advantageouscasting angle. As the tide turns, the Bass hold in these deeper plug pools.

 

As the tide starts to drop, the Bass must retreat. The Herring now must run the gauntlet back out to open water. It is here where they are at their most vulnerable & big bass will be waiting to ambush them as they attempt to escape. Bass like to cruise parallel to the beach under these conditions. Look for troughs 15 to 50' out and dump soft plastics and Bombers into them.

 

Time is now dwindling, your window is closing. As the water goes out, morning often approaches. Casting distance suddenly becomes a big issue. Reach for the SP Minnow & take your best shot.

 

Outgoing water can become strong. If you can post up near first light in a beachfront spot at the mouth of the creek, this would be a good time for the Pikey. Let the water take it 100 yards or more. Then start to bring it back. You'll feel the "Thump, Thump, Thump" as it slowly swims. Viscous explosions can still occur. Be ready.

 

As first light hits, you might need a Pencil. If any fish are showing, reach them and hang the pencil in the zone as long as possible. I love the Guppy and the Super Strike Sinking Little Necks for this. Also, the Super Strike Stubby Bullet can be awesome for long distance work. Move the bullet side to side, pump, pump, jerk the tio, repeat.

 

I often marvel at how "smartly" Herring have evolved. Their run is so cool. They are little brilliantly colored warriors. They slip in and out with great stealth. Herring are a critically important baitfish in our ecosystems. Their run should be observed with respect. It is a privilege to fish among the Blue Herons and to walk the sacred creeks & beach fronts.

 

The quarry you seek to catch must be fooled with imitations of nature's coolest bait-fish. This is a game you will loose, more often than you will win.

 

The stubble will set in on your face. You will begin to lose touch with reality. Night-time is lonely. It is quiet. Find a friend you can fish with. Doing what I describe alone is sketchy. Hang on to your sanity.

 

You will also run into all sorts of unexpected potential threats. Bears? Check. Coyotes? Check. Bobcats in Heat? Check. Foxes? Check. Fisher Cats? Check. Drunk Drivers returning from bars while you'Re walking the side of the road? Check. Are yiu readin' my drift here?

 

Be prepared. Stay safe. As good as you think you've become, one slip from the end of a jetty, alone in the dark...that's all it takes. Safety first.

 

You will begin to look forward to an egg & cheese sandwich on a roll, a coffee and then a quick nap. Your adventure from the previous night will now be over as it melts into yesterday's trip and tomorrow's plans ...but your dreams will just be beginning.

 

At some point, you will know that you belong to the fraternity of night fishermen. Your spotlight will be in the back seat charging and you'll take many a ride at night, just to look. You will want to know the "pulse" so you can anticipate your next series of moves.

 

You will realize that despite all you now know & have experienced, that you know nothing. It is then that your angling journey truly begins. Because it becomes just a part of who you are. A small, insignificant being filled with passion for the wild.

HOLY WRITE AN EPIC NOVEL AT TWO AM BATMAN!!!

 

Dude... you were freaking me out there with your Herring Night Stalker X-Files stuff. Wild. What's this about "infra-red. lens " on the flashlight??

 

You are a very good writer and with your depth of experience coupled with an appreciation for nature and a ssense if humbleness, you should seriously consider writing for On Da Water and Smurf Casters Journal .

 

I grew up on a tidal creek that was a classic herring run and this makes me want to get back there this spring. Thanks for this article... it's really taken my understanding up about two or three notches. Seriously... polish this up a bit and call Kevin at OTW or Zeno at SJ.

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Thank you woodbugger21,

 

Some of the absolute coolest fishing for Big Bass is done at night, during the Herring Runs along the New England coast. Numerous tidal creeks can get serious pushes of full grown 9' to 12" Atlantic Herring. This incredible phenomenon gets to be very predictable, once the run is on. Bass lurk up into shallow water and can be found keying on incredible schools of panicking Herring who are desperately trying to make their way up stream to spawn.

 

The Herring begin to mass and congregate under the complete cover of darkness before they make their epic pushes up and into the creeks.

 

An infrared lens on a very powerful rechargeable light is a tremendous way to view all of this activity without spooking the scariest pods of Herring and as an added bonus, you might just get to see some huge stripers lurking below the bait fish, their red eyes will almost scare you as you watch them, they appear as ghost like leviathan or monsters, they even look evil. They are caught in the act. Killing. Killers. Because of your admiration of the Herring, the Bass will startle you

 

I have "shined" from over-looks and bridges for many years and have witnessed some startling frenzies in some of the most unexpecting places.

 

Tidal brooks take on a marshy eerines as the misty night air sets in. Communities are mostly sleeping as this is all going on, the houses line the edges of many favorite spots, their lights long dimmed or extinguished.

 

Blue Heron often stand near you and stare back like the completely wild, seemingly prehistoric, creatures that they are. Their presence is always a good sign.

 

Countless nights I've parked in a sketchy spot, walked along a road, hopped a fence, fished behind a bar that was closing...do this for long enough and you become a shadow, one who is wary of turning on a white headlamp light for fear of the consequences.

 

One shine from such a light will of course reveal exactly what is going on, but it will also cause the water to explode as the Herring completely panic and race for cover. The entire pool may be spooked for several minutes or even longer.

 

Your ears begin to hear the night noises, the sounds of large tails smacking the surface right in front of you are not soon forgotten.

 

Herring Runs are epic, lasting for many weeks and are therefore very important. Fishing them hard, if at all, is not for everyone.

 

Most "creek stalkers" Fly-Fish for Herring & tie completely sick looking very large flies. I would be one of those dudes. I ride a blacked out fat tire bike so I can bring additional gear. The game involves waders, head lamps with red/white lenses, packable layers as it can get frosty cold, a thermos or two, your night plug bag all set up with the usual choices which for me are pre rigged 9' Sluggos, Yum Houdini Shad, Double Wide Hogy's, Mambo Minnows, SP Minnows and a few Bombers. I also bring a few pencils and a large Pikie or Metal-Lip or Bottle Darter for the times night turns into morning and I'm still fishing.

 

If you dedicate yourself to Herring fishing, just go get an 8' Century Slingshot rod, or maybe a 9' Ron Aara. It is so worth it. These types of rods are a stellar investment as they throw lighter plastics & lures and allow you to work them. You have to "make" plastics come to life. They are expenive. But, if you buy one you won't regret the purchase.

 

If you find a creek-mouth, as the tide rises, you want to begin fishing here. Herring slip into the water near the creek mouth and seem to wait out in the deeper water. This is where you have your first chance to do well. Try VERY slow retrieves either a Bomber. Try fluttering a Mambo. Stick type baits like these can kill it. Make sure you have the Wonderbread or Mother of Pearl baits as well as the specific Mambo imitations. They are both lethal baits.

 

Move up the creek as the Stripers follow the Herring. Herring of course like spawning in very skinny water. So 40lb. Bass at some point will not be able to make ithe further up than certain points. Look for these places before high tide & position yourself upstream of them with an advantageouscasting angle. As the tide turns, the Bass hold in these deeper plug pools.

 

As the tide starts to drop, the Bass must retreat. The Herring now must run the gauntlet back out to open water. It is here where they are at their most vulnerable & big bass will be waiting to ambush them as they attempt to escape. Bass like to cruise parallel to the beach under these conditions. Look for troughs 15 to 50' out and dump soft plastics and Bombers into them.

 

Time is now dwindling, your window is closing. As the water goes out, morning often approaches. Casting distance suddenly becomes a big issue. Reach for the SP Minnow & take your best shot.

 

Outgoing water can become strong. If you can post up near first light in a beachfront spot at the mouth of the creek, this would be a good time for the Pikey. Let the water take it 100 yards or more. Then start to bring it back. You'll feel the "Thump, Thump, Thump" as it slowly swims. Viscous explosions can still occur. Be ready.

 

As first light hits, you might need a Pencil. If any fish are showing, reach them and hang the pencil in the zone as long as possible. I love the Guppy and the Super Strike Sinking Little Necks for this. Also, the Super Strike Stubby Bullet can be awesome for long distance work. Move the bullet side to side, pump, pump, jerk the tio, repeat.

 

I often marvel at how "smartly" Herring have evolved. Their run is so cool. They are little brilliantly colored warriors. They slip in and out with great stealth. Herring are a critically important baitfish in our ecosystems. Their run should be observed with respect. It is a privilege to fish among the Blue Herons and to walk the sacred creeks & beach fronts.

 

The quarry you seek to catch must be fooled with imitations of nature's coolest bait-fish. This is a game you will loose, more often than you will win.

 

The stubble will set in on your face. You will begin to lose touch with reality. Night-time is lonely. It is quiet. Find a friend you can fish with. Doing what I describe alone is sketchy. Hang on to your sanity.

 

You will also run into all sorts of unexpected potential threats. Bears? Check. Coyotes? Check. Bobcats in Heat? Check. Foxes? Check. Fisher Cats? Check. Drunk Drivers returning from bars while you'Re walking the side of the road? Check. Are yiu readin' my drift here?

 

Be prepared. Stay safe. As good as you think you've become, one slip from the end of a jetty, alone in the dark...that's all it takes. Safety first.

 

You will begin to look forward to an egg & cheese sandwich on a roll, a coffee and then a quick nap. Your adventure from the previous night will now be over as it melts into yesterday's trip and tomorrow's plans ...but your dreams will just be beginning.

 

At some point, you will know that you belong to the fraternity of night fishermen. Your spotlight will be in the back seat charging and you'll take many a ride at night, just to look. You will want to know the "pulse" so you can anticipate your next series of moves.

 

You will realize that despite all you now know & have experienced, that you know nothing. It is then that your angling journey truly begins. Because it becomes just a part of who you are. A small, insignificant being filled with passion for the wild.

HOLY WRITE AN EPIC NOVEL AT TWO AM BATMAN!!!

 

Dude... you were freaking me out there with your Herring Night Stalker X-Files stuff. Wild. What's this about "infra-red. lens " on the flashlight??

 

You are a very good writer and with your depth of experience coupled with an appreciation for nature and a ssense if humbleness, you should seriously consider writing for On Da Water and Smurf Casters Journal .

 

I grew up on a tidal creek that was a classic herring run and this makes me want to get back there this spring. Thanks for this article... it's really taken my understanding up about two or three notches. Seriously... polish this up a bit and call Kevin at OTW or Zeno at SJ.

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This is a great, informative post. I wish that I could contribute, but can't say I have ever specifically fished a herring run.

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CARY GREAT THREAD!, love your posts, you are right on the money with EVERYTHING !!, hope to fish with you this year up north,, will PM  YOU,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,you are correct, a dying art, plugging with convential,, gear - Butch N.   

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Thank you blackdogfish. Glad you enjoyed!

Cary- Can you post a bit of info on the infrared lens thing?  You get these somewhere and somehow attach to any flashlight?

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CARY GREAT THREAD!, love your posts, you are right on the money with EVERYTHING !!, hope to fish with you this year up north,, will PM  YOU,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,you are correct, a dying art, plugging with convential,, gear - Butch N.

 

Thank you Butch! Its funny, today I'm in the workshop tying flag tails, thanks to Mike at Mike's custom plugs, who gave me some sample Stainless Steel Flag Stubbs which are awesome. I'm slowly working through many lures and plugs and up next wouldn't you know it, are a pile of Herring imitations. I set them all up on my bench hastily yesterday afternoon and when I sat down last night to start one glance at them cause me to drift off, daydreaming I guess.

 

I think I must spend 90% of my free time either thinking about or planning for the 10% of my time when I actually get to fish. Obviously that 10% number is a yearly number and I try to make it go up as much as possible at certain times of the year. I'm glad you've enjoyed the posts you have a great community here thanks to people like you!

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This is a great, informative post. I wish that I could contribute, but can't say I have ever specifically fished a herring run.

Do you do any night fishing? I grew up in Roscoe, New York. If you don't know the town it's the home of the Beaverkill and the Willowemok rivers (no Herring I'mean afraid, mountain town).

 

There was a cult of old timers who, during summer months, would fly-fish the old quick-way at night. Jim Bashline was a fella from PA and he really had the night fishing game down pat. I often wonder what it would be like to take someone like him Striper fishing during a night Herring-run.

 

Everything I've ever learned with regards to fishing has been built on people a lot more knowledgeable than myself who were kind enough to help me get started.

 

Your post made me think about this concept. There is a tremendous amount of crossover between freshwater fishing tactics in saltwater. I have a hunch you know a hell of a lot more than you're giving yourself credit for.

 

Understanding bait fish is the big key to success. The more in depth your understanding gets the better your success will be, theoretically anyway.

 

Herring are very unique. Besides their distinct body profiles and coloration, the way they swim is also important and I think this gets magnified in shallow water. This may be why certain imitations work a lot better than others.

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Posted (edited)

Cary, this past fall, or I should say this past LATE fall here in Jersey, we had a exceptional run of herring,with the fishing being GREAT!, from the last week of November till the first week of January,but the herring we had here, after we didn't know, were a ROUND NOSE HERRING, which one of Jersey older and wiser fisherman (Shelly Caris)reseached

Edited by lureman

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Cary- Can you post a bit of info on the infrared lens thing?  You get these somewhere and somehow attach to any flashlight?

Well, growing up in the country predator hunting at night was also another popular thing to do in order to get certain fly-tying materials. So obviously the problem with night fishing in night hunting is you can't see where you're going number one and number to you speak anything if you shine a white light at it. So covering flashlights with red foil what kind of the old fashion way to do it, but in today's world we have so much better options. You see there's a lot of crossover between fishing and hunting and many hunting gadgets work great for fishing applications in the same is true of fish and gadgets working great for hunting applications.

 

Let's take a quick look at some very effective night time items.

 

post-40947-0-12058900-1453916869_thumb.jpg

post-40947-0-53101800-1453916902_thumb.jpg

 

My personal favorite does the job but it's very bulky. I don't much care because I have a little holster that I made out of ballistic nylon and I just stick it on the bike so I can whip it out while standing on a bridge and shine it down at the water. Take the infrared lens off and you will literally see everything obviously whatever was there will be completely spooked but things will return to normal after a while and maybe by the time you get down to your fishing spot and get all set up you'll be good to go. Using the infrared lens cuts your real visibility down to a degree but as you get acclimated to the dark you'll get used to this and you will see what you need to see. Fish to react a tiny bit to the infrared light but they don't panic. Shining the white light on him and literally the water will explode especially if you do it on a beach front Wow! LOL. One thing is be careful and look around because if there are other fishermen present they will not appreciate the white light and you'll notice they all have red lights.

 

One thing I definitely love about the white light though his were walking in the woods when you want to speak things and also truly light up a path. On the bike I may be flying along on a trail and I have encountered all sorts of undesirable creatures and when startled they can be very aggressive. Not to worry I have a shotgun mount too, for a matte black Benelli Cordoba 12 gauge pump loaded with buckshot! Like I said better safe than sorry!

 

post-40947-0-07262300-1453917261_thumb.jpg

 

Next up we have a readily available headlamp that has an infrared light as well as a white light and most likely a green light and a blue light and it's a miracle it I can't also double as an alarm clock and a Christmas tree ornament! This one's fairly bright and is water resistant but it certainly has a shelf life the buttons eventually break or stop working. I go through one every couple of years or so. All of these devices have varying degrees of brightness as does the handheld Cyclops light in the first two photos above. Their brightness as you might have guessed is measured in lumens. Lumens are kind of like horsepower. One candle equals one lumen. The brighter the better obviously but the drawback is power drain. If you spend the extra money and get a brighter light you'll be happier most likely.

 

post-40947-0-52653600-1453917559_thumb.jpg

post-40947-0-87729200-1453917594_thumb.jpg

 

A headlamp I have started to really like is the UK Vizion, it's a 3 triple battery led highly water resistant light that has a white in a red lens built into it. By rotating one of the knobs you can alternate between the white and the red light and you can also change the angle of the beam which is quite handy if you're a fool like me and you like to ride a fat tire bike in the dark. Headlamps work fine with baseball caps not to worry the broom doesn't seem to affect visibility.

 

post-40947-0-08164500-1453917746_thumb.jpg

post-40947-0-06691700-1453917783_thumb.jpg

 

Lastly let's dip into the hunting bag of tricks and look at a surefire lithium powered light. These lights have infrared attachments and you can order them. Generally switching back and forth between the white and the red is very expensive so you most likely want to just get a red one. The light in the picture is just a plain white one but I will tell you what the lithium battery is the by far and away the best power source in most of these little suckers are extremely bright. I carry one with me at all times in my waiting jacket it's very handy when walking a trail. Sometimes just for fun I will shine a beach with the white light, providing no other fishermen are around, just to really see what's going on. One time I did this while approaching a very active fishing spot the water exploded and though there was all sorts of fish around they apparently knew I was there because I didn't catch anything all night. Fortunately I hooked up at first light and so it wasn't a total bust! Surefire lights are a very nice luxury and a good idea to have handy. Be warned the batteries are also ridiculously expensive.

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Oh yeah... OK... red lens. I thought you meant actual INFRA red which is different from visible red. Thanks. I have normal headlamps with white and red lights.

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