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ANy advice on digging sea clams?


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#1 clamchucker

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Posted March 11 2012 - 3:36 PM

live close to marsh/scit/dux beach ,,,,, any advice on digging clams
heard that after a good blow they will be on beach,,,,, can they also be
dug at low tide? i assume it must be just like digging any ol' clam?

thanks,
CC


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#2 robc22

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Posted March 11 2012 - 4:06 PM

Bob G. is our resident sea clamming expert...........He prefers to watch the latest episode of "shameless" on show time while his wife is out earning the clams......you can PM him directly for clamming' advice..........:)


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#3 loligo

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Posted March 11 2012 - 4:25 PM

live close to marsh/scit/dux beach ,,,,, any advice on digging clams
heard that after a good blow they will be on beach,,,,, can they also be
dug at low tide? i assume it must be just like digging any ol' clam?
thanks,
CC


Hull Beach after a NE blow....all you want, just don't eat 'em.:D


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#4 Angler #1

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Posted March 11 2012 - 4:47 PM

Clam chucker Loligo has the best advise close to where you live, but the same is true at Scusset beach or even Sandy Neck and those you can eat.

If you have the where for all walk out on the dry sand areas and look for holes or small patches of sand that have a rise to it . Have a long handled tine fork four or five tines and rake away

The minus tide drops are the best to work, especially after the water has been kicked up from a storm


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#5 robc22

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Posted March 11 2012 - 6:58 PM

All kiddin' aside.....Bob is the best resource I know off when It comes to "alll things shellfish"..........A good guy to hit up with your shellfish questions.........


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#6 JamesJet

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Posted March 11 2012 - 9:09 PM

so a pitchfork and not a clam rake is the preferred tool? how deep are they usually?


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#7 hotfishgirl

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Posted March 11 2012 - 9:42 PM

Hull Beach after a NE blow....all you want, just don't eat 'em.:D


I agree with this as i spent my pre teen age years in hull i remember seeing a ton of them washed up on the beach.


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#8 bob_G

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Posted March 11 2012 - 10:33 PM

live close to marsh/scit/dux beach ,,,,, any advice on digging clams
heard that after a good blow they will be on beach,,,,, can they also be
dug at low tide? i assume it must be just like digging any ol' clam?
thanks,
CC


Digging sea clams is about as easy, and low tech as it gets.

It's generally done in CC Bay, from the canal, north. All you need is, a 2** minus tide, a potato rake, a 5 gallon bucket, and a pair of rubber knee high boots.

Wait until the tide reaches it lowest stage, then walk out onto the outer most, exposed sand bars. These are the ones you don't ordinarily see on an average low tide. Unlike steamer clams, you just don't knee down and dig them. But rather, you need to walk the outer bars (on the sand bar and not in the water), and look for the classic "clam hole" or an indentation or some sort of small crack in the dry sand which indicates there's a clam there. Then, just dig it up with your potato rake. They'll only be a few inches below the sand.
Down my way, we had a 2** minus tide this weekend, and I was just too sick to go. My wife went by herself, and got a half bucket in under an hour.

Good luck, and have fun.


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#9 shark lobster

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Posted March 12 2012 - 6:31 AM

hey i eat the sea clams from nantasket beach , and other than me glowing in the dark , for a week or so ,there is not much wrong with them !


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#10 Joe G

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Posted March 12 2012 - 7:48 AM

....
The minus tide drops are the best to work, especially after the water has been kicked up from a storm



Digging sea clams is about as easy, and low tech as it gets.
It's generally done in CC Bay, from the canal, north. All you need is, a 2** minus tide, a potato rake, a 5 gallon bucket, and a pair of rubber knee high boots.
......



Keeping secrets? I thought you two would also refer to the "bearded eggers" sea clam we harvest at spawn time. :drool:


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#11 Angler #1

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Posted March 12 2012 - 8:55 AM

Joe sometimes it is best we not devulge all of the bounty the sea has to offer.

Since you brought it up, I can say that the bearded egger's are one of the most cherished parts of going after Sea clam in the surf. Many whom find them, really never get to appreciate the special taste they provide to an evening meal. During our hey days on the beaches, fishing, my son would always include them in the morning breakfast on the beach. The hard part was finding them and then attempting to separate the eggs from the beard. The similarity to caviar from sturgeon eggs, makes the search for them a bonus from the ocean. Yes the search for one of the surfs best secret is well worth the effort


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#12 JTR

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Posted March 12 2012 - 10:38 AM

If you are good with your toes, there is no need for a minus tide, just a low tide. You might need a wetsuit this time of year, but otherwise, it it a piece of cake. I can get tons with just my hands and feet. First, find a sand bar that you think holds clams. When there is no more than about 2 feet of water, slowly walk around on either your heels or the balls of your feet, applying enough pressure so that your feet sink into the sand a tiny bit. When you feel what I would call a "crack," which is the clam releasing air when stepped on, just carefully dig down with your toes. I say carefully, because if you catch the shell at the wrong angle, it can cut you. I usually pop the clam out with my foot and then pick it up or net it. You will want a mesh bag or something like it with you.

My grandmother lived on Nantasket her whole life. She would always walk down to the beach after a storm and grab a few clams to give to her cats. One day, Mr. EPO caught grandma and wrote her a ticket. :mad: No warning or anything. It was pretty obvious that she wasn't knowingly taking clams illegally and she literally was taking 2 or 3 after a storm. I never understood that one.


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#13 BjcTogger

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Posted March 12 2012 - 10:41 AM


Any beach where you kind of sink into the sand (i dont mean quicksand) but digging in is the best place for digging clams as well as muddy waters. I use a clamrake or my feet  and grab them if the water is not too shallow. 




#14 Angler #1

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Posted March 12 2012 - 11:13 AM

JTR sea clams in and around Nantasket were once considered contaminated and not suitable for eating. In most cases where I have heard folks getting tickets, was because it take a special permit to take contaminated sea clams I have been down there after a huge blow and they would be stacked a few feet high and every one that was taking them were cleaning them on the beach and just taking the meat for bait


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#15 JTR

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Posted March 12 2012 - 11:27 AM

JTR sea clams in and around Nantasket were once considered contaminated and not suitable for eating. In most cases where I have heard folks getting tickets, was because it take a special permit to take contaminated sea clams I have been down there after a huge blow and they would be stacked a few feet high and every one that was taking them were cleaning them on the beach and just taking the meat for bait


Well I guess you learn something new every day. Thanks Angler


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