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Replacing an Ignitor in gas oven


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#1 eddieg710

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Posted February 08 2012 - 4:31 PM

I'm pretty sure I need to replace the 'ignitor' in our gas oven. The oven will not heat up but the top burners and broiler go on without any problem. Replacing it seems straight forward but I've never done it. Should I leave this one to the 'pros'? Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks!


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#2 Chunkah

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Posted February 08 2012 - 4:38 PM

The broiler goes on but the oven does not....wierd. When my ignitor / element died nothing would turn on but the burners.



#3 eddieg710

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Posted February 08 2012 - 4:49 PM

The oven has two ignitors. One for the broiler and one for the oven.


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#4 mybeach

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Posted February 08 2012 - 11:01 PM

The glow bar is an easy replacement for the average do-it-yourselfer. Find a supplier near you, they probably have the part in stock, and you can ask them for advice. It's actually pretty easy to do, but make sure you get the correct part. Look for a major appliance retailer/servicer, and by that I mean a high end supplier.

What brand stove is it?



#5 Kings over Queens

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Posted February 09 2012 - 7:43 AM

Replacing it seems straight forward but I've never done it. Should I leave this one to the 'pros'? !

Appliance repair is pretty simple and straightforward, and definitely in the realm of a competent DIYer.

Diagnosing the issue is half the battle.





#6 Billybob

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Posted February 09 2012 - 7:47 AM

It's a piece of cake, screw it on and plug in the wire.
On some, you may need to cut the wire and butt splice.



#7 jmlandru

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Posted February 09 2012 - 8:00 AM

Be careful. Some of them are extremely brittle. Don't drop it.



#8 HJS

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Posted February 09 2012 - 8:24 AM

Yeah, fairly easy to do. Those dang ignitors are expensive!!! Local stores seem to be reluctant to sell or get me the part, but then I live a ways out in the country. I buy mine off the Internet and get very fast service. Having the model # and part # (from the manual) is crucial to picking out and buying the part.



#9 shbeachbum

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Posted February 09 2012 - 8:25 AM

Be careful. Some of them are extremely brittle. Don't drop it.


I did mine several times and they are made from ceramic--DO NOT DROP OR BANG IT. Easy job but I would also pick up ceramic wire nuts just in case the ones you have on now need to be replaced.Heat will melt plastic ones used for regular wire connections



#10 eddieg710

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Posted February 09 2012 - 10:02 AM

Thank you for all of the responses!! I got the part # from the owners manual and will give it a try within the week. I'll keep you posted.


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#11 Charleston

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Posted February 09 2012 - 11:48 AM

I did one once. The screw that held it in was all burned and brittle. I had to break the old one out, then mount the new one by drilling a hole and using a sheet metal screw.
BTW how old is the stove? You may want to replace both ignitors while you are at it.


Went to see the whatfixer.


#12 Highlander1

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Posted February 09 2012 - 12:30 PM

I did one once. The screw that held it in was all burned and brittle. I had to break the old one out, then mount the new one by drilling a hole and using a sheet metal screw.
BTW how old is the stove? You may want to replace both ignitors while you are at it.


Unlike things like headlights or sholaces that you normally replace two at a time, not necessary in this as the broiler ignitor is probably only used 10% of the amount of the oven ignitor. Easy job, get yourself a couple ceramic wire nuts, and a pair of wire cutters and your good to go. I also found that shopping the internet for parts saved me about 50%, small time appliance stores are notoriously high priced so save yourself a bunch of dough.


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#13 eddieg710

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Posted February 09 2012 - 2:54 PM

I did one once. The screw that held it in was all burned and brittle. I had to break the old one out, then mount the new one by drilling a hole and using a sheet metal screw.
BTW how old is the stove? You may want to replace both ignitors while you are at it.


Thanks, Bill!! The stove is about 5/6 years old but we rarely use the broiler.

Unlike things like headlights or sholaces that you normally replace two at a time, not necessary in this as the broiler ignitor is probably only used 10% of the amount of the oven ignitor. Easy job, get yourself a couple ceramic wire nuts, and a pair of wire cutters and your good to go. I also found that shopping the internet for parts saved me about 50%, small time appliance stores are notoriously high priced so save yourself a bunch of dough.


Ceramic wire nuts... Noted! Thanks!

An online retailer has the part for about $40 whereas a local retailer has it for $90+. I don't know why but I'm hesitant on buying the part on-line since its significantly cheaper. Are the on-line parts comparable?


The fool who persists in his folly will soon become wise.

#14 mybeach

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Posted February 09 2012 - 3:05 PM

I wouldn't hesitate to use an online part supplier. Check another local supplier if you can't wait for it. Even Sears might carry one.



#15 Gully

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Posted February 09 2012 - 7:57 PM


i agree.  the elements are fagile.  whatever you do DO NOT touch the element itself.  the oils from your hand will cause it to crack prematurely. 



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