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How many Presidents were voted out after one term....


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#1 albacized

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Posted September 27 2011 - 12:27 PM

...but his replacement came from the same party? Particularly post 1950 and not including impeachment, etc (i.e they were simply voted out)



#2 John M

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Posted September 27 2011 - 12:30 PM

...but his replacement came from the same party? Particularly post 1950 and not including impeachment, etc (i.e they were simply voted out)


0

LBJ is closest I guess, having not run in 1968. but a rep took over afte rhim.........

Truman coulda run in 52 I think? but didnt.......a rep took over after him


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#3 TheSpaniard

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Posted September 27 2011 - 12:32 PM

Not gonna happen. As bad as the field of Rep hopefuls are, the Dems have pretty much nothing behind Obama and would struggle even more than the Reps in finding a candidate...... We truly are at an all time high in lack of leadership in this country.....

John


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#4 Jay Dog

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Posted September 27 2011 - 2:30 PM

I don't think any President in Modern times (post civil war) was replaced on the Ticket after one term and the Party went on to win the presidency. Course it could happen next year, Clinton is ready to go, I'm talking Bill again not Hillary ;) Constitution says President can't serve more then 2 consecutive terms, I don't think it says anything about taking a break for 12 years and then coming back.



#5 danflytr

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Posted September 27 2011 - 2:37 PM

Like my dear old dad told me when he wanted me out of his house after high school :confused: (Let me see it was something like this "Don't go away mad just go away" :confused: Or was it this "Don;t let the door hit you on your A_s on the way out") :confused: ;)



#6 Skiddd

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Posted September 27 2011 - 6:17 PM

Like my dear old dad told me when he wanted me out of his house after high school :confused: (Let me see it was something like this "Don't go away mad just go away" :confused: Or was it this "Don;t let the door hit you on your A_s on the way out") :confused: ;)




Dad told me something like that also........


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#7 lichum

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Posted September 27 2011 - 6:29 PM

I don't think any President in Modern times (post civil war) was replaced on the Ticket after one term and the Party went on to win the presidency. Course it could happen next year, Clinton is ready to go, I'm talking Bill again not Hillary ;) Constitution says President can't serve more then 2 consecutive terms, I don't think it says anything about taking a break for 12 years and then coming back.





U.S. Constitution Amendment 22 [1951] - Presidential Term Limits



1. No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twice, and no person who has held the office of President, or acted as President, for more than two years of a term to which some other person was elected President shall be elected to the office of the President more than once.

But this Article shall not apply to any person holding the office of President, when this Article was proposed by the Congress, and shall not prevent any person who may be holding the office of President, or acting as President, during the term within which this Article becomes operative from holding the office of President or acting as President during the remainder of such term.

2. This article shall be inoperative unless it shall have been ratified as an amendment to the Constitution by the legislatures of three-fourths of the several States within seven years from the date of its submission to the States by the Congress.


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#8 Ditch Jigger

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Posted September 28 2011 - 11:18 AM

Andrew Johnson, 1868.

Johnson was a Democrat prior to the Civil War, but accepted Lincoln's offer to run on the Republican ticket in 1864. The GOP changed its name to the "National Union Party" for that election. After being impeached by the GOP led House, and escaping removal from office by a single vote in the Senate, he obviously wasn't offered the GOP nomination in 1868, but sought the Democratic nomination, and lost. He was succeeded in office by Republican US Grant.

Calvin Coolidge was also succeeded by a Republican, Herbert Hoover, but Silent Cal chose not to seek re-election. I can't think of a single case where a sitting President was denied re-nomination, but if there was one, it was likely before the Civil War.


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#9 jettyjockey18

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Posted September 28 2011 - 8:24 PM

Andrew Johnson, 1868.
Johnson was a Democrat prior to the Civil War, but accepted Lincoln's offer to run on the Republican ticket in 1864. The GOP changed its name to the "National Union Party" for that election. After being impeached by the GOP led House, and escaping removal from office by a single vote in the Senate, he obviously wasn't offered the GOP nomination in 1868, but sought the Democratic nomination, and lost. He was succeeded in office by Republican US Grant.
Calvin Coolidge was also succeeded by a Republican, Herbert Hoover, but Silent Cal chose not to seek re-election. I can't think of a single case where a sitting President was denied re-nomination, but if there was one, it was likely before the Civil War.


Franklin Pierce is the only one, replaced by Buchanan(?)...