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Who actually runs 93 octane in their small engines?


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#1 Gaff & Release

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Posted May 12 2011 - 11:50 AM

Just as the title says. I'v read a lot of people using 93 in their small engines (lawn mowers, chainsaw, etc). Who here does? Notice any difference?

#2 speedracer

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Posted May 12 2011 - 12:19 PM

A lot of small 2 stroke engine manufacturers recommend using a mid grade fuel. My lawnmower repair guy told me to always use the highest octane available for my small engines because it keeps the internals cleaner and boosts power. I use higher octane for my chainsaw, trimmer, blower, etc. and use regular octane in my tractors.
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#3 fishn808

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Posted May 12 2011 - 1:49 PM

I would use the highest octane gas available without ethanol.

#4 bass-o-matic

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Posted May 12 2011 - 3:37 PM

The premium gas helps a lot with the Ethanol issues.

#5 DougH

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Posted May 12 2011 - 3:39 PM

It is not an easy task to find non ethanol gas around here.

#6 digger

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Posted May 12 2011 - 4:41 PM

The place that services all the small engines around here swears by a non ethanol 2 cycle 93 octane 50:1 premix called Tru-Fuel. It'';s guaranteed shelf stable for 2 years without any additives.
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#7 Gaff & Release

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Posted May 12 2011 - 6:37 PM

The place that services all the small engines around here swears by a non ethanol 2 cycle 93 octane 50:1 premix called Tru-Fuel. It'';s guaranteed shelf stable for 2 years without any additives.


Sounds expensive :squid:



#8 Smulax

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Posted May 12 2011 - 6:40 PM

I also use higher grade gasoline in my small engines. I figure the extra money is worth it, plus I only buy a gallon at a time. about a gallon every 2 months isnt as bad as filling up the truck.
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#9 stresst

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Posted May 14 2011 - 9:52 PM

Ive been using 91/93 for years in small engines. Growing up we always had ATV's, snow mobiles, jetski's and my father always bought hi-grade gas. He would put regular in his cars but super in all small engines. I always figured it was better and never looked back. I assume its better. To tell you what I bought a 1400+ Toro snow blower this past winter and the dealer told me to use premium fuel.

#10 Farflung

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Posted May 19 2011 - 5:56 PM

got a new small Stihl 017 for tree stand and light work. Dealer said to only use higher octane in it, as saw is designed for it and it has higher compression.

#11 OldCowboy

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Posted May 21 2011 - 8:41 PM

I started using premium gas in my lawnmower last year, based on comments on this board. I think it definitely runs smoother. I've never had much trouble starting it, so can't tell any difference there.

#12 Plug Maker

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Posted May 24 2011 - 8:06 AM



I just googled "is premium gas cleaner than regular"

USA today- "High-test does have a potential fuel economy benefit. It is slightly denser than lower-octane gas, meaning there's a little more energy in a gallon. But the small difference is hard to measure in real-world use, and that same density can contribute to undesirable buildup of waste products inside the engine. "


My uncles gas station has 2 tanks, premium and regular. When you want middle grade (89) it mixes on the fly at the pump. All 3 grades of fuel same as far as clean goes.




#13 Offshore24

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Posted May 24 2011 - 12:09 PM

Premium gas has higher octane to prevent detonation, pinging, knocking. It does not increase horsepower. In fact, becasue it prevents detonation by burning colder than regular it actually contributes less Btu's and less horsepower. I only use it when it's called for by the manufacturer.

The octane rating of gasoline tells you how much the fuel can be compressed before it spontaneously ignites. When gas ignites by compression rather than because of the spark from the spark plug, it causes knocking in the engine. Knocking can damage an engine, so it is not something you want to have happening. Lower-octane gas (like "regular" 87-octane gasoline) can handle the least amount of compression before igniting.

The compression ratio of your engine determines the octane rating of the gas you must use in the car. One way to increase the horsepower of an engine of a given displacement is to increase its compression ratio. So a "high-performance engine" has a higher compression ratio and requires higher-octane fuel. The advantage of a high compression ratio is that it gives your engine a higher horsepower rating for a given engine weight -- that is what makes the engine "high performance." The disadvantage is that the gasoline for your engine costs more.