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Eagles Dare

Epoxy bar top finish?

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Good question. This is something I've always wanted to do. Have thousands of corks saved for a bar that I wanted to build. Would be very interested to hear if anyone has done this.

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I know if you put it on too thick theres a chance it could develop cracks at some point. I seem to remember air temperature as being pretty important.

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View PostI know if you put it on too thick theres a chance it could develop cracks at some point. I seem to remember air temperature as being pretty important.

 

Thats correct. To much it could crack, dries to fast it could crack.

 

 

If you get the stuff that you need to mix catalyst in it could crack if you make the mixture to hot and if you don't put enough in it won't dry.

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I used it on our kitchen table about 2 months ago. Not too big of a deal to do. Read the directions carefully several times before you start. Have all necessary materials (mixing containers, sticks, spreaders, etc.) ready before you begin. Use only plastic drop cloths as the "canvas" type will allow the resin to seep through and stick to your floor redface.gif!

 

The only pain in the neck about the job was constantly having to smooth over the vertical edges of the table as the epoxy would constantly drip until it was sufficiently cured. Two coats about 1/16" thick each did the trick. Allow the epoxy to self-level, don't try to work it out too much with the spreader.

 

The only thing that bothers me about the finished product is that place mats/trivets are an absolute must for warm/hot plates, dishes, pans, etc. Anything warm wants to stick to the table, and I mean STICK!

 

It does look good though. I hope this helped.

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View PostI used it on our kitchen table about 2 months ago. Not too big of a deal to do. Read the directions carefully several times before you start. Have all necessary materials (mixing containers, sticks, spreaders, etc.) ready before you begin. Use only plastic drop cloths as the "canvas" type will allow the resin to seep through and stick to your floor redface.gif!

 

The only pain in the neck about the job was constantly having to smooth over the vertical edges of the table as the epoxy would constantly drip until it was sufficiently cured. Two coats about 1/16" thick each did the trick. Allow the epoxy to self-level, don't try to work it out too much with the spreader.

 

The only thing that bothers me about the finished product is that place mats/trivets are an absolute must for warm/hot plates, dishes, pans, etc. Anything warm wants to stick to the table, and I mean STICK!

 

It does look good though. I hope this helped.

 

Wish I wouldv'e read this before we dove in last night. biggrin.gif

 

Like you said, the only difficult part was the constant dripping off the edges. We started late and I didn't feel like staying up all night babysitting the edge. Top looks awesome but there are a few hardened drips along the bottom edge. Not real visible but I'm going to try and sand or file them down anyway. Another good tip about the plastic drop cloths only - wife put down an old sheet on one side. The stuff ran right through it and made a couple half dollar sized drops on the bar's footrest. We talked about covering that with some kind of rubber anyway. Luckily the whole underneath was sitting on plastic as it was on top of a brand new hardwood floor. cwm31.gif

 

All in all it was pretty painless. Got a buffet station we're gonna try to do somewhere down the road.

 

Thanks for the help.

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I have used Enviro-tex lite for bar tops. It's difficult to work with and runs like crazy, but it comes out awesome if you do it right.

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You can also try damming it with tape so it does not drip off the edges. Then when its dry, remove the tape, sand any areas where the tape stuck and apply a thin coat over only the edge with a small brush. It will make the edges shine like the top and you'll have a nice thick finish.

 

Be sure to put up a piece of plastic as a "ceiling" over the job to keep the dust off the top.

 

Use a blow dryer or hair dryer to remove the bubbles that you will inevitably create as you pour the stuff. Before using the heat gun or blow dryer, let it run for about 10 seconds with the nozzle pointed away from your work...the purpose of this is to get all the dust out of the heat gun so you don't blow dust boogers into your work. The heat gun easily removes all bubbles.

 

MIXING IT PROPERLY is CRITICAL to a good job. Mix it thorougly. Mix it 50/50. When they say 50/50, believe me they mean 50/50. Don't get tricky and try to mix in a little extra hardener or anything like that...50/50 period.

 

When you're done mixing, pour the whole mixed batch into a new container before pouring it onto the top. That way you won't pour any unmixed stuff (which can remain along the sides of the container you did the mixing it).

 

You get a lot of working time, so if you mix too little, you can mix more and pour again.

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Ive worked with it a lot. The best place to buy from is US Composites in Miami. Always mix precisly and stir a long time. Wear a mask as the tiny bubbles in the air are deadly. Always have a raised edge to catch and hold the runoff. Always spray down the wet resin after the pour with alcahol in a mist sprayer. This will eliminate the millions of air bubbles trapped in the resin within seconds. I always cover the whole job with a light plastic tent until the next day to minimize dust paticles.

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I know this is an old post, but going to try this soon. I know a lot about epoxys and polyurathanes. But have one question. Can I apply epoxy on raw sanded wood? And would I need two coats? Or would one work? Thanks

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I know this is an old post, but going to try this soon. I know a lot about epoxys and polyurathanes. But have one question. Can I apply epoxy on raw sanded wood? And would I need two coats? Or would one work? Thanks
It depends how thick you want it. I always have a wooden edge and level perfectly before I pour the resin right up to the edge. I usualy do about1/4 inch thick. Yes it will laminate to wood. Be precise in the mix. Use matching containers so its a prefect 50 /50 if that is the mix.

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I'm doing a kitchen counter top made of brazilian walnut, so may not be able to use wooden edge. Any tips....? Thanks barrel!

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I did a faux marble threshhold in my kitchen recently, I had to do something custom as I couldnt find one to fit. I made a wood base and then leveled it with epoxy, painted it and then another coat of etex. I was pretty happy with the results.

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Oh tape...duh lol
Your never going to get tape pefectly level, flat, and plumb. Lancer cant you rip a 1/4 piece of walnut 1/4 inch wider then the counter edge and tack it around the perimeter to hold the resin?

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