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haddock rod with sensitive tip


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#1 Ryan H

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Posted March 04 2010 - 3:16 PM

I am looking for a rod that is light and sensitive enough to feel the bight of a haddock and can hold 50 pound test for less than 90 dollars


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#2 shmikeynyc

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Posted March 05 2010 - 10:51 PM

I am looking for a rod that is light and sensitive enough to feel the bight of a haddock and can hold 50 pound test for less than 90 dollars


look at ugly stik sensitive and cheap


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#3 Billy 40

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Posted March 06 2010 - 9:17 AM

what does sensitive mean? I love this topic.


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#4 FishNH

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Posted March 06 2010 - 9:40 AM

what does sensitive mean? I love this topic.

Well for most people that actually fish for Haddock it means a tip that you can feel the bite and that the rod is not too stiff to pull the hook out of a haddocks soft mouth

But you knew that already didn't you?


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#5 Billy 40

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Posted March 06 2010 - 9:46 AM

Feel he bite, or see it? Big difference. Soft flop tip on an ugly stik you can see, not feel.


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#6 FishNH

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Posted March 06 2010 - 10:11 AM

Feel he bite, or see it? Big difference. Soft flop tip on an ugly stik you can see, not feel.

you can feel it. not like some other rods like the Seeker CSB909 I use but the blank is more than he wants to spend.

Help the guy out alittle don't you have any experience with rods under $90 ?


Ryan, your best off hitting a local shop and see what works for you also bring the reel you will be using to see how it balances with the rod


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#7 Billy 40

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Posted March 06 2010 - 10:52 AM

I'm not familiar with a set of guides that costs less than $90, let alone the whole rod, lol.


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#8 FishNH

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Posted March 06 2010 - 1:20 PM

I'm not familiar with a set of guides that costs less than $90, let alone the whole rod, lol.


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#9 Ryan H

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Posted March 06 2010 - 10:42 PM

thanks for the information i already have a custom made jig stick for cod and i was looking at a shimano rod any bad things other than them beging made in china, i should how about, or any good things to go along.


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#10 FishNH

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Posted March 06 2010 - 10:52 PM

thanks for the information i already have a custom made jig stick for cod and i was looking at a shimano rod any bad things other than them beging made in china, i should how about, or any good things to go along.

not familiar with them but just remember you want a rod that can also handle a nice big cod if it happens to grab your clam bait


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#11 Ryan H

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Posted March 07 2010 - 1:14 PM

yay i tought about that but ive heard of some freestyle jigging rods that they make and it seems that they are what i am looking for.


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#12 Brooks1176

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Posted March 08 2010 - 9:42 PM

I have a shimano rod i use for bait 7' not in front of me right now but its served me well for 5 years. i'll check the model # tomorrow, it was less than $100.00 soft enough not to tear out their mouth but stiff enough to feel the bite. braided line is yer friend


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#13 albacized

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Posted March 08 2010 - 11:07 PM

Why do you need two different rods for cod and haddock...If it's because haddock hit a little lighter, then use braid; problem solved.


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#14 Ryan H

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Posted March 09 2010 - 5:04 PM

theres a reason if you are fishing on a head boat and dont want to mess around with those microscopic knots and it not what i like to use !!!!!

Mono rules braid drules


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#15 albacized

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Posted March 10 2010 - 10:53 AM

That's certainly your choice - however, have you tried braid before? I don't have any problems tying knots...and that would be especially true with heavier (50lb or more) braid. I turned to braid for all my fishing 5 years ago from freshwater trout and bass, to the 'big' four here in NE (stripers, blues, bonito, albies)...as well as whatever groundfishing I still do (from party boats and my yak). Someone would have to outlaw it before I switched back. There's no way mono is better than braid.

There are probably certain applications where mono might be more appropriate. However, those are far and few between (and generally freshwater orientated)...and braid will still suffice in those situations. In deepwater fishing for fish such as cod and haddock (regardless of bait or jigging) braid is way more advantageous than mono...no stretch, more sensitive, more power to drive the hook home. If you're that worried about knots, you could easily tie on a clip to the end of the braid while you're still at home (as well as some pre-tied rigs with both bait and jigging set ups)...that way, all you have to do is clip on a new pretied rig if so necessary.


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