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Snakehead Fish in Potomac


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#1 t58martin

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Posted October 13 2005 - 11:49 AM

The Washington Post recently ran a story on how Snakeheads had infiltrated the Potomac River and its tributaries. Since pasting the link is discouraged, I've pasted the article below.

It seems they're being caught in much higher numbers now. Snakeheads are illegal Asian immigrants so to speak. They are very aggressive and grow up to 33 inches. When they found them in lakes they were draining the lakes and making a big fuss. You don't drain the Potomac, and the Potomac feeds the Chesapeake, and the Chesapeake is prime spawning ground and so on.I was reading an earlier thread on how far upstream Stripers will travel. I wonder how the competition for food is going to pan out. A bunch of folks here seem to be pretty knowledgeable about fish in general, I was interested in opinions. Boy, if it's not one thing it's another.

Article:

washingtonpost.com
In Rain's Wake, a Deluge of Snakeheads
At Least 80 of the Predatory, Invasive Fish Caught in Potomac Tributary

By Joshua Partlow
Washington Post Staff Writer
Tuesday, October 11, 2005; B01


The water was alive. Snakeheads, hundreds of them, were slithering among the minnows, rising up through the concrete blocks that dam Dogue Creek like salmon leaping for freedom.

Sunday was, in the Potomac River's increasingly bizarre snakehead history, a landmark day. And it was something Mark Hammond, in three decades of fishing the Potomac tributary near Fort Belvoir, never dreamed he would see.

"They're in there by the thousands. You could see them literally coming up along the banks. The ones we caught didn't even put a dent in them," said Hammond, 43, an avid bass fisherman from Florida living here temporarily. "We would throw one in the cooler, two others would jump out and we'd have to chase them through the woods."

Since last year's discovery that the voracious, nonnative northern snakehead had infiltrated the Potomac River and its tributaries, fishermen have pulled them up in ones and twos, each catch a major event that further solidified the proof of an entrenched and breeding population.

In the first half of this year, about 15 snakeheads were caught in the Potomac and its tributaries, including several in Dogue Creek, but nothing has matched the haul Sunday and yesterday of at least 80. Its cause isn't yet clear.

"I think we have the state record," Hammond said of the catch behind the trailer lot where he and his friends drink beer and practice bow-hunting.

Nothing was normal about Dogue Creek on Sunday afternoon. The weekend rains had swollen this section, a couple of miles from the Potomac just off Route 1, far beyond its usual thin trickle. The sandy creek bed swarmed with small minnows and bluegills inching upstream toward a marshy pond. Among the smaller fish, Hammond's friend Mike Bowers noticed, were an inordinate number of bass.

"Wait a minute, I thought, those aren't bass," said Bowers, 42, of Mount Vernon. "Those are snakeheads!"

Bowers, Hammond and another friend, Tom Dustin, soon got to work. They didn't need bait. With fishing poles armed with three-pronged hooks, they snagged the snakeheads by the backs. They dipped in nets and pulled out clumps of them. They worked into the evening using headlamps to guide their work, hoping, as they had heard, that someone might be offering a bounty for the predatory species.

"We're trying to get paid," Bowers said.

By yesterday afternoon, the ranks of snakehead anglers included Woodrow Minnick, 20, and Matt Thackery, 24, but the catch was declining because the water had subsided.

Still, the brown spotted snakeheads could be seen wending their way upstream through thick blooms of minnows.

"See, see, right there! Right under that tuft in the bank: That's a snakehead," Hammond said, now wielding a long harpoonlike instrument. "There are too many of them. They're here to stay."

The northern snakehead, native to China and Korea, first appeared in the area in 2002, when it was discovered in a pond in Crofton. Authorities found six adults and 1,000 juveniles when the pond was poisoned. Last year came what fisheries experts say is a more disturbing development, when more snakeheads -- with no genetic connection to the Crofton fish -- were found in the Potomac, worrying scientists that the breeding population could throw the ecosystem out of balance.

The Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries has been contacted about the catch but had not visited the fishermen by yesterday afternoon to verify the details.

However, a state fisheries biologist confirmed from photos that the fish are snakeheads, department spokeswoman Julia Dixon said.

"We don't really know how they're going to behave in our waters," Dixon said.

"They're a top-line predator, so they're going to be competing for the same food and space as bass, and we'll just have to see what shakes out," she added.

Virginia fisheries biologist John Odenkirk said 90 snakeheads have been caught in the Potomac and its tributaries, including 70 this year. This is a strong indication that the fish are migrating, because they're moving upstream.

"It's incredible," Odenkirk said.

The catch by Hammond and friends did answer a few questions, such as: Can the snakehead actually walk? Not well. On the ground, the snakehead does stay upright, unlike other fish, but wiggles very slowly across the ground.

Allan Ellis, promotions manager at Bass Pro Shops Outdoor World at Arundel Mills in Hanover, said that although gift certificates of up to $50 were still in effect for bringing in snakeheads, they don't apply in this case.

Only "legal methods," not nets or treble hooks, qualify, he said.

"We're not going to give out $4,000 in gift cards for fish caught in nets," he said. "But thank you for your enthusiasm and thank you for ridding the Potomac of this scourge."
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Regards,

TMAR

#2 marlinman

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Posted October 13 2005 - 12:28 PM

Snakehead fling?

Lawful use of firearms encouraged.
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#3 t58martin

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Posted October 13 2005 - 12:29 PM

The culprit....




Nice teeth...


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Regards,

TMAR

#4 Surf Hunter

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Posted October 13 2005 - 1:00 PM

The best Sci-Fi original horror flick regarding these fish:

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Be the chimp, not the frog.....

#5 eastendlu

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Posted October 13 2005 - 1:47 PM

How do they taste, they fry well?
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#6 eastendlu

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Posted October 13 2005 - 1:47 PM

How do they taste, do they fry well?
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#7 ferret

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Posted October 13 2005 - 1:49 PM

Even dead them eyes look evil
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#8 Steve M

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Posted October 13 2005 - 2:06 PM

Really bad news.

Looks like a freshwater version of the yellow eyed devil.

Steve
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#9 Matt A.

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Posted October 13 2005 - 3:02 PM

Ya i wonder how they fry up? :-D
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#10 fishchile

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Posted October 13 2005 - 3:41 PM

Bass Pro is paying a bounty on them if they are caugh on hook and line. I don't recall the $$ amount.
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"Nick did not like to fish with other men on the river. Unless they were of your party, they spoiled it." Ernest Hemmingway, "Big Two Hearted River (1925)

#11 Animal

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Posted October 13 2005 - 4:12 PM

not sure about down virginia,but in RI,MASS,they are released by careless pet owners when they outgrow the tank.Then they eat every other fish in the pond.once they run out of food,they leave the water and mudskipper their way to another pond.Imagine a freshwater bluefish(or a school of them)who could destroy whole lakes,then move to the next one.Illegal to own as pets anymore.you potomac boys better get busy.
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#12 here fishy fishy

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Posted October 13 2005 - 5:39 PM

break out the torches and pitchforks
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#13 IronMike

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Posted October 13 2005 - 7:42 PM

They're delicious.
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#14 Mokele Mbembe

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Posted October 14 2005 - 4:27 AM

I've tried them in Central Asia several times. Locals just hook a small frog (snakeheads are just crazy about them) on a treble hook with 10-15 ft of line tied to a bush and wait. Damn thing ate almost all frogs there in a few decades after introduction (quite stupid). Now they have MOSQUITOES!!! I've seen snakeheads there up to 16 lbs! I wouldn't say taste is good, it's OK, seemed a bit too dry, definitely worse than a pike. The best recipe for them was to grind their fillet, mix with chopped onions and egg, then fried- that wasn't bad at all!
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#15 Mokele Mbembe

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Posted October 14 2005 - 4:28 AM

I've tried them in Central Asia several times. Locals just hook a small frog (snakeheads are just crazy about them) on a treble hook with 10-15 ft of line tied to a bush and wait. Damn thing ate almost all frogs there in a few decades after introduction (quite stupid). Now they have MOSQUITOES!!! I've seen snakeheads there up to 16 lbs! I wouldn't say taste is good, it's OK, seemed a bit too dry, definitely worse than a pike. The best recipe for them was to grind their fillet, mix with chopped onions and egg, then fried- that wasn't bad at all!
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